Great American Ball Park Parking Guide | Cincinnati Reds

Ballpark Parking


Great American Ball Park Parking Guide | Cincinnati Reds

Posted by Kurt Smith

Greetings Baseball Fans and Ballpark Aficionados! I’m here with your complete, info-rich Great American Ball Park parking guide! Below I’ve listed a bunch of great tips for finding your ideal parking spot at the home of the Cincinnati Reds.

Whether you want to go cheap, be near pre- or post-game entertainment, or have an easy out afterward, the Reds, Cincinnati and even nearby towns have you covered.

There’s a lot here, so I’m breaking it down for you:

Getting To Great American Ball Park By Car
Cincinnati Reds Parking Lots + Garages
Downtown Cincinnati Parking (+ The Connector)
Parking in Newport, KY
Parking in Covington, KY
Using The Southbank Shuttle
TANK Park and Rides

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Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #1) Arriving By Car + Traffic

access to Cincinnati Ballpark

Indeed, I would rate access to the Cincinnati ballpark as “excellent”.

There are three interstates that border Great American, I-75 to the west, and I-71 and I-471 to the east. I-71 runs through downtown parallel to 3rd Street, and joins with I-75 going into Kentucky. Here’s the map to help you visualize it.

All three interstates have preferred exits to get to the ballpark, which the Reds detail on their website. Which exit you use depends on your parking choice, and since you have plenty of options you can plan the route accordingly from where you are. Usually the ballpark exits are the most congested. That said, even if you do hit stopped traffic, it’s not likely to last very long.

Your biggest problem might be if you decide to park in downtown Cincinnati, especially during the workday. There are lights at almost every intersection and many of the numbered streets are one way. You also may have a tougher time finding an available parking space.

In my visits, I haven’t seen much congestion outside of Pete Rose Way, Second Street and Mehring Way near the ballpark, which is to be expected on game days. Most of downtown is banks and business buildings, so near game time people clear out and there isn’t a lot of traffic.

 

great american ball park parking newport on the levee

Where Reds game parking is available and cheap!

If you decide to park across the Ohio River in Kentucky—in Newport or Covington—heading south especially you shouldn’t have to deal with much traffic at all, in or out. I’ll cover those in a bit.

Exiting the ballpark, the heart of the traffic is underneath the ballpark onto 2nd Street, and the East Garage onto Pete Rose Way. Interestingly, I saw very few people turning from Pete Rose Way onto the Taylor Southgate Bridge after a game. So if you know your way around downtown Newport that could be a time saver. According to a police officer I talked to, the easiest exits are further from the ballpark (which would include Kentucky) and from downtown.

The city has named nearby streets after Reds greats; for reference Pete Rose Way East on the north side of the ballpark is Riverside Drive east of the park; Joe Nuxhall Way is Main Street south of Second Street; and Johnny Bench Way is Broadway Street between Great American and U.S. Bank Arena.

Now, here are your parking choices

 

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #2) Cincinnati Reds Parking

great american ball park parking guide cincinnati reds

With a strong clue to the garage’s location.

The official Great American Ball Park parking lots are right next to and underneath the ballpark, and on their site the Reds supply a useful PDF map of the rest of the parking lots in the area.

The Reds pre-paid lots are generally for season ticket holders, so sometimes tickets from third party sellers will include this. They tend to be the most expensive, but they’re not terribly pricey compared to some cities. Lots open three hours before game time.

If you’re using the Reds’ official parking lots, it’s a good idea to order a pass ahead of time. There are usually spaces available, but in my travels I saw a lot of “pass only” signs at the entrances. You can buy a pass on the Reds’ website.

The Central Riverfront Garage underneath the ballpark is easily accessible from Pete Rose Way coming from the east and Mehring Way coming from the west. There are plenty of spaces, but it takes a while to exit, so you might want to kill some time in a nearby eatery first.

From the East Garage you can go to the fifth floor and use the walkway past the Heritage Bank Center. It’s less visually appealing, but it’s less crowded with fans and safer, and leads to the Machine Room restaurant entrance. The East Garage is also slow to exit, possibly the slowest of all of them, at least from what I could tell. It is cheaper before the game rate starts, whether you can park there early I don’t know. Central Parking was silent on that when I asked them.

 

gabp parking reds paycor stadium

The best thing about football is that it helps people park for baseball.

There are also official Reds lots at Paycor Stadium (Bengals) west of the ballpark. These are slightly cheaper and not much further away, and there are usually ample spaces here. Coming from the west, the stadium lots should be good for convenience and a relatively easy exit. They are also the only lots where I saw any tailgating.

If you’re bringing a busload of folks, the city will let you park the bus at the Riverfront Transit Center for a reasonable price, and it’s just across the street. It’s underground though, and a hike up a lot of steps to the street. I saw a lot of elderly folks huffing and puffing and felt bad for them.

If you have car trouble after the game, you can contact AAA at (513) 762-3222, and they’ll jump start you or fix your flat tire. Not sure what that will cost you if you’re not a member.

That’s just Reds parking. Since there are so many additional parking options for Reds games, I’ve broken them down into locations: downtown Cincinnati, Newport, and Covington. All three have their advantages.

 

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #3) Downtown Cincinnati Parking.

great american ball park parking downtown cincinnati

Parking for a sawbuck is one reason I love GABP.

Very close to the ballpark are a couple of surface lots—one at 3rd and Main, and one at 204 Broadway—that are very convenient to the ballpark and cost about the same as the Reds lots. The Broadway lot is under an overpass, protecting your car from the elements, and it may be a slightly easier exit than the Reds lots.

North of the ballpark, there are ample lots and garages. The general rule is that the closest ones to the ballpark are the most expensive; lots on 3rd Street can cost close to parking at the ballpark. Since it’s only a block or two before prices start dropping, it’s worth looking for place to park on 5th or 6th Streets. Broadway and Main Streets lead directly to the ballpark, so the closer you are to those the better. You can find some very cheap lots just a few blocks away.

A word of caution though. You can find stories of unsafe areas in the Over The Rhine section of Cincinnati, so I wouldn’t leave my car too far north of the ballpark.

 

cincinnati reds parking fountain square

I don’t know if it’s still this cheap. I doubt it. But there’s other advantages!

Fountain Square, on the corner of 5th and Vine, is both convenient to the ballpark and inexpensive; it’s also a stop for the (free) Connector light rail, which I’ll talk about shortly. The game rate starts about three hours before game time. Fountain Square is an especially popular spot for Reds fans; it’s cheap, large and well-lit. There is also good dining nearby and often entertainment in the Square itself.

Something to remember about parking in the heart of downtown though. Great American Ball Park is at the foot of a hill, so most any place you park downtown is going to be an uphill walk after the game. You might want to park near the light rail and use that going back…it’s free but it will be crowded after the game.

 

cheap parking at Great american ball park

The best part is, you don’t even need a monthly pass!

Finally, in Sawyer Point, a park east of the ballpark past the Purple People Bridge (more on that in a bit), there are lots that are very cheap on game nights and allow for a fairly easy exit eastbound. They’re not super close, but you can take a fine walk along the banks of the Ohio River to get to the game.

Here is a favorite parking hack of mine that you can use. There are several lots near the ballpark that have a much lower rate before the game rate kicks in. I believe 3rd and Main is one. If you get to such a lot earlier in the day, you can nail a spot close to the ballpark for a fraction of the price.

So what to do then to kill time? Lots! Take the Southbank Shuttle to Newport-On-The-Levee and enjoy all of the entertainment options there. Or use the (free!) Cincinnati Bell Connector to several attractions downtown, like the Findlay Market. Or visit the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. There’s no shortage of fun options…Cincy is a cool town.

 

Cincinnati Bell Connector reds game

Light rail is your friend!

Then head back to the ballpark for the game, and afterwards you have a short walk to your car. And you paid a fraction of what everyone else paid to park there.

I heard this next tip from Jake Cain at Ballpark Savvy, who lives in Cincinnati and knows the area well. There is a lot at International Friendship Park on Riverside Drive, on the riverfront near Montgomery Inn. It’s definitely a hike but free if you can land a spot.

Parking downtown on the street for free is also no longer an option; meter enforcement runs until 9:00 PM and on Sundays. You could feed the meter until then, but it’s probably not worth it. They are free on holidays though, something to remember for Memorial Day, Independence Day or Labor Day.

If you don’t want to spend time looking for a cheap or convenient spot, you can reserve a spot ahead of time with my friends at SpotHero…which I always highly recommend for any ballgame.

One final word about parking downtown—it might not be a good idea for weekday games. Garages even at the ballpark and metered spots will likely be filled, and you might not have much luck searching along the riverfront either. If you’re coming for a weekday game, parking in Kentucky and using the Southbank Shuttle is probably a better bet. So let’s discuss that…

Never drive to a Reds game without a plan…

Book your parking spot now with my friends at SpotHero!

 

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #4) Newport, KY

Newport On The Levee Garage reds parking

Not just parking, but parking parking.

The most popular place in Newport to park for games is the garages next to the Newport-On-The-Levee entertainment complex. There is an indoor garage there, some outside spaces, and the Aqua Garage next door; they are all very affordable. There is usually ample parking.

The Levee lots are easily accessible from either the Taylor-Southgate Bridge or the Dan C. Beard Bridge (I-471). Coming from the east it’s a fairly easy out onto I-471.

From the Levee lots you have a couple of choices. Either walk across the pedestrian-only Purple People Bridge (the official name is the Newport Southbank Bridge, but you wouldn’t know it from signage) to get to the ballpark. You can also walk across the Taylor-Southgate Bridge, but I did this and found it highly unnerving. Or you can hop on the Southbank Shuttle, which I’ll talk about in a bit.

 

Purple People Bridge great american ball park parking tips

It’s nice and purple, and people do like to use it, but it’s a hike from the ballpark.

It’s a pretty long walk, this; it takes some time to cross the pedestrian bridge obviously and then you still have a few blocks to get to the ballpark. It’s not something I would do just to save money; there are lots almost as cheap much closer. The walk is good if you enjoy a scenic view—it is that—or you’d like to burn off some calories after the game or before partying in Newport.

If the Newport garage is full, which isn’t likely, there are metered spaces down near the riverfront that are relatively cheap, but you need to climb up and then back down a bunch of steps to get to the PP Bridge. Better to use lots or numbered streets in Newport–these are also just a few bucks, but you’ll want to use the Southbank Shuttle from this distance. Don’t park there on a street-cleaning day.

Newport is a happening spot; there are multiple places to eat or drink and Newport-On-The-Levee is a tourist center with lots to do for kids of all ages. If you plan on post-game good times with your Reds baseball, especially with the kids, Newport is the place to put your car.

$$$ Tightwad Tip! $$$ – You can save a few bucks by arriving at the Newport lots before the game rate starts. The game rate isn’t bad, but parking there before a couple hours before game time is a little less and it’s good for the whole night.

 

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #5) Covington, KY

reds game parking covington ky

Let this bridge here be your landmark.

Covington, across the John Roebling and Clay Wade Bailey Bridges, isn’t the tourist center that Newport is. In fact, it’s not even close. But that can actually be a good thing if you’re just looking to get to a game and leave afterward.

The Southbank Shuttle runs through Covington…I’ll talk about that next, I promise…and there is a free park and ride for it under the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge.

There isn’t much in the way of major parking lots east and near the foot of the Roebling Bridge, but there are plenty of inexpensive parking meters there. There are spots along the river, and also along Greenup Street, Park Place, and 3rd Street, which are just steps from the Roebling Bridge. There are also quite a few restaurants nearby. (I’m a Skyline Chili fan, but you have several other choices too.)

Unfortunately Covington wised up to people parking there for Reds games, so meters are enforced until 9:00 PM. Still, they’re not terribly expensive. Meters are inactive on Sundays, so chances are good you can find free parking for a game.

On the west side of the bridge are quite a few garages, but they aren’t thought of highly by Googlers, so take that for what you will.

 

great american ball park parking covington ky

This pretty sweet view is courtesy of the Roebling Bridge.

From the street spots in Covington you can walk across the Roebling Bridge. It’s not as long a walk as the Purple People Bridge from Newport. Again, it isn’t as pedestrian-friendly as the Purple People Bridge (I wouldn’t be able to do it with kids), but it isn’t too bad and it’s historic. Honestly though, using the Shuttle is easier.

Covington isn’t the prettiest of areas, but I didn’t feel terribly unsafe there. It’s also not too long a walk along a scenic walkway via 4th Street to get over to Newport and its attractions. I didn’t try it at night though, so I don’t know how well that works. For a day game, it should be just fine.

Traffic is a little easier leaving Newport, but it’s far easier to exit Covington than from one of the Reds’ lots.

 

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #6) Southbank Shuttle.

southbank shuttle reds game

Shuttles like this were made for savvy blog readers like you.

Okay, so I’ve mentioned the Southbank Shuttle a few times; I love it for the possibilities.

The Southbank Shuttle is TANK’s (Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky) tourist-friendly trolley bus service. It circulates from Covington through Cincinnati and ends at Newport, or back in the other direction, for just a buck (!) as of this writing.

The trolley starts additional service two hours before the game and runs every 15 minutes. So you shouldn’t have to wait long for it. On game nights, the shuttle will run until a half hour after the game.

The Shuttle is more than worth the small price to ride it; it spares you both the indignity of high-priced parking and post-ballgame traffic, which is far easier to deal with in Kentucky. Not to mention avoiding the lengthy walk across the river and a scary bridge.

You can often find free street parking in Covington or Newport and for a dollar get a ride to the game, but there’s also plenty of other affordable options to park near the shuttle. As I’ve said, there is even a TANK Park and Ride location in Covington; it’s at 3rd Street at Pete Rose Pier and parking is free. There is a Shuttle stop right there. Cheap as can be and easy peezy.

 

tank bus to great american ball park

They do know that “Ball Park” is two words in Cincinnati, don’t they?

With the demand for folks who need a ride to the game, TANK will provide additional big buses to get to the ballpark. These buses helpfully have “Great American Ball Park” displayed as the destination. They will stop at TANK dropoff points near the Shuttle stops, and are the same price. You need exact change on the bus or the Shuttle.

Be sure that you get on the right Shuttle after the game; the destination will be at the top of the bus. Also, the small trolleys are a bit rickety; if you prefer a smoother ride try one of the big buses.

Again, I love the Southbank Shuttle…it makes it possible for you to both avoid traffic and enjoy some entertainment and dining options in Kentucky. Take advantage of this one folks.

$$$ Tightwad Tip! $$$ – There are a few establishments in the Newport-On-The-Levee complex (and you might find one or two in Covington) that will pay for your Southbank Shuttle ride to the game and back with a purchase. It’s already cheap, but if you’re buying something anyway it could save you another couple of bucks.

 

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #7) TANK Park + Rides

Covington Transit Center reds game parking

Have you opened your eyes to the wonders of Covington yet?

Finally, this could be a useful one for you on occasion. TANK has a fleet of buses with routes throughout Covington and Newport; nearly all of them stop at the Covington Transit Center at the foot of the Roebling Bridge, a half block from a Shuttle stop. Many of them also stop in downtown Cincinnati and in Newport. The longer routes have free park and rides in northern Kentucky, like the aforementioned 3rd Street/Pete Rose Pier location.

Several TANK routes can take you within a fly ball of the ballpark, but check the schedule and make sure you can use it to get back. Just one example: the #8 Eastern Avenue/Crestview Hills bus stops at 4th and Walnut, about a block and a half from GABP.  The last bus departs around 11:30 PM, so you should easily make it.

 

TANK park and ride great american ball park

Bus stops here? Check. Goes to Cincinnati? Check. All good!

For most games, if you’re coming from Northern Kentucky there’s probably a free park and ride you can use; this can save you mucho bucks on gas with TANK being a cheap ride. TANK also has discounted fares for seniors and handicapped folks, and gives free rides to Northern Kentucky University and Gateway students and staff. If you’re staying in a hotel that will shuttle you to the CVG Airport, you can get on a bus there, and get to the ballpark for almost nothing.

Being a great money-saver aside, TANK buses do make a lot of stops. You might find it to be not worth the hassle. Just putting it out there if you want to go really cheap.

There’s also the Queen City Metro option as far as bus rides go, but not a lot of people use it. I’ll talk about non-driving options in a future post.

 

great american ball park parking tips

Having the ballpark in view is always a plus.

There you go; all you need to know and then some for parking for Cincinnati Reds games at this great American ballpark. <grin> I hope you found these tips useful, and if you’ve got a great one to share, feel free to drop me a line!

There’s plenty more tips for your next visit to the home of the Reds on this website, by the way. Check out some seating tips here, here, and here, learn about some great food items at the Cincinnati ballpark, and what to know when you’re bringing the kids.

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Free Shuttles to American Family Field | Milwaukee Brewers

Posted by Kurt Smith

Milwaukee is a town full of crazed Brewers fans, and every game day is a celebration. In addition to the insane tailgating, dozens of taverns and bars offer free shuttle service to American Family Field for Brewers games. (Call it Miller Park if you want, but it’s an insurance place now.)

A Brewers shuttle offers multiple advantages. Baseball fans can park for free, enjoy great food offerings or drinks without paying ballpark prices, and avoid sitting in post-game traffic. If you’re staying at a hotel or near a bar with a shuttle, it’s a great way to avoid drinking and driving afterwards too.

So as a public service, I’ve compiled this complete list of establishments that will give you a ride to the Brewers game, or any major events at the retractable roof wonder. I’ve included some info about each one. Here is also a helpful map with their locations, so you can make a decision based on where you want to be.

Here’s the breakdown:

Blue Mound Road + Nearby Establishments
Downtown Milwaukee
West Milwaukee + West Allis
Wauwatosa + West Wauwatosa
From A Bit Farther Away
Hotel Shuttles

So after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started:

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free shuttle to american family field kelly's bleachers

Don’t worry, they’ll find someone to drive too.

American Family Field Shuttles: Blue Mound Road + Nearby

Blue Mound Road is almost walking distance to American Family Field, so these joints are not far from the ballpark. There is usually free street parking near these places, and some of them have their own lots.

Balistreri’s Bluemound Inn (6501 West Blue Mound Road). Balistreri’s is an Italian lunch and dinner restaurant; they were once voted “Best Late Night Food” by Milwaukee Magazine. They have Friday fish frys and highly rated pizza. They don’t say anything about their shuttle on their website, but they’re on everyone’s list and they do have a large private parking lot.

Brewski’s Sports Pub (304 North 76th Street). Brewski’s, according to their Facebook page, offers craft beer, cocktails, and a dog-friendly patio. I doubt you can leave your dog there when you go to the game though. It’s basically a sports bar with a menu featuring nachos, totchos, Buffalo chicken wontons, wings, etc. They also have fish frys on Fridays. Their shuttles run starting two hours before game time, and they sometimes offer drink specials for shuttle users.

Dugout 54 (5328 West Blue Mound Road). Dugout 54 was formerly Derry Hegarty’s, and you can still see the name in signage at the place. The Dugout has all of 32 beer tap lines with multiple craft beers, but they also offer table seating for families. The menu includes burgers and sandwiches, wings with numerous sauces, and a “pretty sizeable pretzel”. Incidentally these are the same folks who run Kelly’s Bleachers…more on Kelly’s in a minute.

 

Milwaukee brewers shuttles J&B blue ribbon

Are you welcoming me or Jagermeister? (Both!)

J&B’s Sports Bar & Blue Ribbon Taproom (5230 West Blue Mound Road). J&B’s Blue Ribbon took over the popular Long Wong’s tavern, and they’ve done a fine job remodeling, including billiards tables and a taproom. They call themselves the home of Milwaukee’s best chicken strips, in case your kids like that sort of thing. They also have pizza, wings, burgers, and of course, Friday Fish Frys.

Kelly’s Bleachers (5218 West Blue Mound Road). Kelly’s Bleachers has all sorts of fun stuff going on…music bingo, beer pong tournament Fridays, and most importantly, Happy Hour discounts. Their menu’s signature items are the Reuben rolls, the “Best Tater Tots Ever” (like anyone can even know that), and a Western burger. They serve a limited menu to meet the demand on game day, but I’m sure they have the good stuff.

Kelly’s website, for some reason, is really awful…it looks like it hasn’t been updated since the early days of the Internet. Don’t let that sway you though, they’re cool folks.

Magoo’s on the Mound (5841 West Blue Mound Road). Magoo’s features burgers, bar appetizers like the famous Wisconsin cheese curds, a “Bavarian Beast” soft pretzel, and that Friday fish fry of course. The beer on tap selection is decent, and their special include Taco Tuesdays and Burger Thursdays. Pool, darts, bags, lots to do.

Yes, it’s named after that Mr. Magoo from the cartoons, and you’re dating yourself if you recognize him. Magoo’s was formerly Steve’s on Bluemound, in case anyone recommends Steve’s to you.

McGinn’s (5901 West Blue Mound Road). McGinn’s calls itself an “All-Star Sports Bar”. Their nightly specials include Thursday wing night and a Steak Special on Wednesdays. McGinn’s Happy Hours include $3 domestic tap and domestic bottles (at least that’s what their Facebook header says, but it is 2024), which is a pretty good deal. I presume that includes game nights. They also have Sunday brunches, great for day games.

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milwaukee steak house american family field shuttle

Perhaps the chef got tired of pronouncing “Coerpers”.

Milwaukee Steakhouse (6024 West Blue Mound Road). The Milwaukee Steakhouse doesn’t mess around with their steaks. As they say, they only offer the best cuts of USDA Choice Black Angus Beef (their capitalization, not mine). Get your steak with garlic, peppercorn, fried onions, or even bearnaise style. They also have signature martinis. Needless to say, this is fine dining, so I wouldn’t expect pub fare here.

O’Brien’s Irish American Pub (4928 West Vliet Street). O’Brien’s actually has their own hydroponic garden, so they can grow their own fresh ingredients. Now that’s thinking of your customers. The menu (with fresh ingredients!) features wings, nachos, wraps, sandwiches, pizza and much more. And of course, they have lots of beers on tap and two Brewers shuttles. O’Brien’s even features a “birthday club”, with perks well worth signing up for.

Rounding Third (6317 West Blue Mound Road). Rounding Third offers up wings in a variety of flavors (I’ve tried the Jamaican Jerk dry rub wings and they’re very good). They also have a Milwaukee cheesesteak, half pound Angus burgers, stone fired pizza, and of course that Friday fish fry. Rounding Third’s prices seem a tad lower than most joints, and they have beer specials, although their beer selection isn’t as varied as others.

 

saz's state house restaurant milwaukee brewers shuttle

Is it me or does the Saz’s building look like a surprised face?

Saz’s State House Restaurant (5539 West State Street). Saz’s bills itself as a first rate restaurant and sports bar, and their menu reflects that…fancy apps like low country shrimp, onion straw baskets, and candied bacon. More importantly, this is a BBQ spot, with ribs, walleye, chicken and waffles, and (wait for it) cornbread chicken pot pie. Not done yet…fancy burgers too, and a gluten free menu. A bit pricier than other joints, but undoubtedly worth it.

They even provide some extra information about their Brewers shuttle. Drink specials on game days. Love that.

Spitfires on State (5018 West State Street). Spitfires is aptly named…if you’re a wing person, this is the place for you. Their wing sauce flavors include ginger sesame, Thai peanut, and blueberry BBQ (check out the full selection…it’s impressive). But they have other stuff too, like burgers, apps (wonton mozz stix!), and sandwiches at reasonable prices. The wide selection of beer and cocktails is also reasonable too, if their website menu is to be believed.

 

 
city lights brewi9ng american family field shuttles

No, the shuttle doesn’t run on beer. That would be pretty cool though.

American Family Field Shuttles: Downtown Milwaukee

These establishments are located in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, good if you’re staying there or making a day of Milwaukee with, say, the Harley-Davidson Museum. Check this helpful map to see more attractions nearby.

City Lights Brewing (2200 West Mount Vernon Avenue). Okay, an actual craft brewery, now we’re living right. City Lights has won multiple awards for beer excellence, including from the Great American Beer Festival. Their beer offerings include even a coconut porter, and they describe the flavors on their site. Oh, and they have food too, even if it’s a limited menu. Burgers, apps, and of course the obligatory Friday fish fry. (Milwaukee makes it easy to be a Catholic.) And their shuttle is nicely decorated.

City Tours MKE (1130 North 9th Street). Okay, so this one isn’t a free ride…but it’s technically a shuttle so it counts. City Tours Milwaukee includes a “Milwaukee Ultimate Tailgate Tour”, where for a set price they’ll take your group to the game in their electric vehicle, fire up the coals, and set up the tables and stuff for you so you can all tailgate like pros. You have to bring your own food and booze, but that’s small potatoes when someone else drives and cleans up!

Fat Daddy’s (120 West National Avenue). The first words you see on Fat Daddy’s website is “Milwaukee’s Most Organized Volleyball”. Great for Brewers fans that are fed up with disorganized volleyball games. But seriously, outdoor volleyball tournaments on sand here, so that’s unique.

Fat Daddy’s has a limited menu of pizza and snacks, but their list of beers on tap and cocktails is lengthy. Daily drink specials here too. You can ride to the game in the “Fatmobile” and talk with fans about how well organized the volleyball was.

 

jack's american pub Milwaukee Brewers shuttles

Spirits, good times, and a ride to a baseball game. It doesn’t get more American than Jack’s.

Jack’s American Pub (1323 East Brady Street). Have you ever watched a game on a 200” TV? At Jack’s, you can, while enjoying steak fries, Santa Fe rolls, award-winning wings with “gun powder”, or a jalapeno mac and cheese burger. There’s other enticing stuff on the menu too, and several high end beers on tap and in cans. They have multiple shuttles, so you shouldn’t have to wait long for one.

Jack’s (along with some other taverns) actually has tailgate parties at the ballpark too, so they’re all in for Brewers fans. Oh, and brunch for Sunday afternoon games.

Milwaukee Brat House (1013 North King Drive). The Brat House bills itself as a “professional drinking establishment”, so it’s safe if you’re serious about a good time on game day. They actually have “a whole fleet of shuttles”, so they’re clearly here to help.

As the name suggests, they offer “Milwaukee’s Best Bratwurst”. You can try the sampler of bratwurst, Polish, Italian and Hungarian sausage for yourself. Or get your sausage in a gyro, a German-style sandwich, stuffed with honey mustard, etc. They have daily food and drink specials and an impressive selection of brews. The Brat House does tailgates as well.

O’Lydia’s (338 South First Street). The O’Lydia’s building was built in the 1800s, but the O’Lydia’s people truly saw the potential. There’s a four season patio and 13 large flat screen TVs. O’Lydia’s has some interesting stuff on their menu, including a Reuben mac, Nashville hot chicken mac, and a triple “B” burger.

O’Lydia’s a late night menu, weekend brunch, the obligatory Friday fish fry, and good specials like Thursday Burger Night. They don’t say much about drinks, so I would come here more for Irish pub grub than for serious craft brew tasting.

Oscar’s Pub & Grill (1712 West Pierce Street). Oscar’s website was blocked by my antivirus, but don’t take that personally…my antivirus blocks anything with capital letters on it. Anyway, they’re the first I’ve seen here to mention Bloody Marys, which are popular in Milwaukee. Oscar’s actually garnishes Bloody Marys with mozzarella and bacon, which should be obvious. They also boast about fresh cut fries, and (wait for it) a Friday fish fry.

So if you like burgers and Bloody Marys, you could do worse than Oscar’s.

 

steny's tavern american family field shuttles

Milwaukee’s #1 Sports Bar (?)

Steny’s Tavern (800 South Second Street). Steny’s calls itself Milwaukee’s #1 Sports Bar, which is a pretty bold statement. But they definitely don’t mess around…get your wings brined, fried, sauced and/or baked, and with sauces that include butter garlic parmesan, Carolina gold and lemon pepper. Lots of other great stuff on the menu too, like specialty pizzas, shareable apps platters, double burgers, and salads.

Steny’s has a very impressive craft beer and drinks list, as the #1 sports bar in Milwaukee should. They shuttle fans to every Brewers game. Don’t forget to get the hand stamp though.

Who’s on Third (1007 North King Drive). Who’s On Third also claims to be Milwaukee’s #1 sports bar. They were ranked in the Top 19 in America by Business Insider, so they’re not alone in liking their establishment. The menu features spicy mac and cheese, a nice selection of salads, half pound burgers and sandwiches, and chef’s gumbo. They also have a late night menu of apps if you’re hungry after the game, and the drinks menu features a lot of fancy cocktails. Might be a good place to impress a date.

Wurstbar MKE (1239 East Brady Street). Instead of deciding between two sports bars that call themselves #1, you could go to the Wurstbar in Milwaukee (snort). Wurstbar MKE is on Brady Street, which they call a lively entertainment district. Fair enough. They’re one of the eateries that do tailgates as well.

Their menu features neat apps like crab Rangoon dip and mini corn dogs, and they have several wursts as you would expect…German style, jalapeno popper, and “Miltown”, which was featured on A&E’s Best In Chow. Wurstbar has a Sunday brunch with breakfast items too. They have multiple shuttles, so in theory you shouldn’t be waiting long.

 

 
aris sports bar milwaukee brewers shuttle

You can tell just by the font that you can probably get a decent gyro here.

American Family Field Shuttles: West Milwaukee + West Allis

Aris Sports Bar (1657 South 108th Street, West Allis). The Aris Sports Bar is part of the Pallas restaurant, so you don’t get confused. They have separate menus, but you can get burgers, ribs, steaks, and Greek specialties like souvlaki and gyros at the sports bar. For breakfast on Sundays you can get Greek breakfast burritos. All good. If you’d like a fancier meal, you can go to the Pallas. It’s not far.

The Aris has a BBQ menu too, with sandwiches and platters of pork, smoked turkey and sausage. Good place for a nice meal and a ride.

Braun’s Power House (7100 West National Avenue, West Allis). Braun’s has bar grub and breakfasts, and their prices are a tad more reasonable than most. Their specials include Build A Burger Mondays, starting at just $3! Better yet, 32 oz. beers for just five bucks, at least according to their Facebook header. Apps include powerhouse nachos, loaded waffle fries, and bacon-wrapped water chestnuts. True. They also have boneless wings with multiple sauces and dry rubs, smash burgers, and that ubiquitous Milwaukee Friday fish fry.

Braun’s is a good spot if you’re going cheap, which is probably a factor in your taking a shuttle in the first place, right?

Flapper’s Bar (7527 West Becher Street, West Allis). Flapper’s doesn’t tell the public much about its bar, except that it’s a “fun kinda joint”, which might be good enough. They do offer free pool (as in billiards, I assume) and drink specials until 6:00 PM some nights. You can get baked or deep fried cod, chicken fajita quesadillas, or wonton wrapped mozzarella logs. There are a lot of pics of food on their FB page, so you could have a look at that.

 

liquid johnny's American family field shuttles

Where it’s all about the liquids.

Liquid Johnny’s (540 South 76th Street, West Allis). Liquid Johnny’s pronounces itself “The Best Fish Fry In Town”, a bold claim indeed, and they have a page on their menu dedicated to it. They have other stuff too, of course…like ”frickles”, wings with a variety of dipping sauces, burgers and sandwiches. The beer list isn’t too shabby…multiple premium beers on tap and in bottles, and they have some hard seltzers too.

Liquid Johnny’s has some neat specials…the Burger of The Month as I write this is the “Almost Elvis Burger”. It’s topped with peanut butter, bacon and cheddar. Eat like the King.

Lucky’s Ice House (4238 West Orchard Avenue, West Milwaukee). Lucky’s, like many places, brags on their Friday Fish Fry too. But I’m not complaining about pics of fried perch and tater tots. Lucky’s menu also features apps like “haystack onions”, wraps, sandwiches, and burgers. The “Who Hot Burger” looks good if you’re into spicy. There’s also salads for healthier sorts.

Lucky’s adds a gratuity to parties of six or more. Something to be aware of if you are many.

National Pizza Pub and Grille (Best Western) (5501 West National Avenue). The National Pizza Pub and Grille is part of the Best Western Milwaukee West, making it easy for guests to eat and get to the game. They have a lot of specialty pizzas, like Buffalo chicken, Mexican fiesta, and Reuben (!). It’s not just pizza though, they also have steaks, ribs and fish, as well as multiple burgers and sandwiches. Their apps include Reuben rolls and pulled pork bites. And wings. They actually have a chef here.

This place is pretty reasonable, and with the varied menu it should be good for families. And of course, super convenient if you’re staying at the Best Western.

Paulie’s Pub & Eatery (8031 West Greenfield Avenue, West Allis). Forget Milwaukee…Paulie’s calls itself the “best pub and eatery in Southeastern Wisconsin!” Stretch your horizons! Paulie’s features live music and entertainment, 18 beers on tap, and a location near the state park, so that does bolster the case a bit.

The menu includes wings with…let me see here…12 sauces and seasonings. There’s nachos with beef, chicken or pork, pizzas, and double burgers with multiple toppings. There’s also specialty sandwiches like the Ultimate Grilled Cheese. And a Friday fish fry, as required if you’re gonna call yourself the best.

 

 
Jacksons blue ribbon pub milwaukee brewers shuttles

You can’t beat a plate of macho nachos outside.

American Family Field Shuttles: Wauwatosa + West Wauwatosa

Camp Bar Wauwatosa (6600 West North Avenue). The Camp Bar offers an interesting twist…it’s designed like a log cabin lodge, with a fireplace, moose head in the wall, etc. They have an impressive selection of beers and microbrews, and signature drinks include the “Camp Bar Side Car” and a 22 oz. Bloody Mary. They have a small selection of food…pizzas and apps like tots and Buffalo chicken bites. Great place to go for atmosphere, and in Milwaukee a fireplace can always come in handy.

Jackson’s Blue Ribbon Pub (11302 West Blue Mound Road). The Jackson’s folks are modest. They claim to be “known for our lively and inviting atmosphere, excellent quality food and great service.” Sounds good to me. The menu includes Macho Nachos, wings with nine seasoning/sauce selections, brisket sandwiches, Reubens, and pizza. They seem to have a better selection of wines than most, and a decent beer selection.

Jackson’s is also closest of all of the shuttle bars to the County Zoo, if you’re making a day of that.

McBob’s Pub & Grill (4919 West North Avenue). Who’s “McBob”? It’s owner Christine McRoberts, who has made the place a staple in Milwaukee. They share a customer’s claim that “McBob’s has simply the absolute best corned beef this side of heaven”. The menu is definitely Irish pub fare: Scotch eggs, Irish spring rolls, Reubens, Irish meatloaf and corned beef hash are all here. They have typically American burgers, nachos, and sandwiches too. McBob’s has some nice specials…Happy Hours most days, with $3 tap beer and a $5 limited app menu.

McBob’s does Friday fish frys too, and they’re gluten-free even.

 

 
redbar saucy swine BBQ american family field shuttles

So, why do you call this place the “Redbar”?

American Family Field Shuttles: From A Bit Farther Away

Credit these taverns for literally going the extra mile:

Fin N Feather (4060 West Loomis Road). Fin N Feather has lengthy Happy Hours…like noon to 6:00 PM on Fridays. Other than free billiards though, they don’t specify what’s cheaper, but hey, free pool is good. They don’t say much about the menu on their Facebook page, other than Luige’s pizza with typical toppings. The reviewers seem to agree that the value for drinks here is pretty good, so it might be a good thrifty place to try.

Friends on Forest Home (5614 West Forest Home Avenue, Greenfield). Maybe not the most electric name for a sports bar, but it’s what we have in Greenfield. The shuttle is only for Friday and Saturday home games, so keep that in mind. I can’t find much about their menu, but reviewers praise the food and drink prices. There’s also a lot of activities going on with them, so you can follow their Facebook page to see if anything entices you to visit Greenfield.

Milwaukee Brat House (4022 North Oakland Avenue, Shorewood). This is the “other” location of the aforementioned Brat House; they have a shuttle too but it may take a little longer. The menu is similar; there’s a jalapeno popper mac and cheese brat that looks amazing and lots of other sausages. Signature burgers and chicken sandwiches, fish fry Fridays, and some decent Happy Hour specials. This one does tailgates too.

Again, their specialty is definitely sausages, and if you’re into brats it’s probably the place to be.

Redbar (2245 East Street Francis Avenue, St Francis). Redbar is part of the Saucy Swine restaurant, but the Redbar itself has a dine-in menu. The Saucy Swine is a popular BBQ joint with the locals, with six house sauces, especially since there aren’t many Brewers shuttles in this part of town. Some very unusual apps here, like Korean fried Brussels sprouts, pork belly bites, and bacon cheese bombs. Try the “Queben” sandwich.

 

 
ambassador hotel milwaukee brewers shuttles

Who’s the real Ambassador?

American Family Field Shuttles: Hotels

I have to imagine there are other hotels in Milwaukee with complimentary shuttle service, but here’s the roster of hotels I found that mention the Brewers:

Ambassador Hotel (2308 West Wisconsin Avenue). The Ambassador is easy to find with the cool old-fashioned sign on the roof. They boast of the largest hotel rooms in the area, extreme high speed internet, and Apple TV in each room. There’s actually three places to eat here, for whatever your mood, or you could just walk to a McDonald’s or Taco Bell if you’ve spent too much on the hotel room.

The Ambassador is a nice departure from typical hotel chains (although it is Wyndham), and while it’s not cheap, it’s not out of this world expensive. Incidentally, they extend free parking and shuttle service to anyone who dines there, so no need to stay the night.

Best Western Milwaukee West (5501 West National Avenue, West Milwaukee). As described earlier, the Best Western is where you can find the National Pizza Pub and Grille, so they have an eatery with your Brewers ride. Like most Best Westerns, this one is reasonable, and it’s actually pretty close to the ballpark. They say it’s walking distance…it’s about a mile, so judge that for yourself.

The rooms have cable TV (STOP THE CAR!!!), can have kitchenettes, and include a free breakfast. (It’s the typical hotel breakfast, which for free isn’t bad.) There’s also an indoor pool, fun for the kids. And a pizza joint.

 

Brewhouse inn and suites American family field shuttles

“I’ll have a craft brew, a clean room, and a place to park please.”

Brewhouse Inn & Suites (1215 North 10th Street). The Brewhouse Inn & Suites is actually the site of the original Pabst Blue Ribbon Brewery. It’s now a hotel…but the best part is you can get craft brews there. Nice rooms, too…kitchenettes, brick walls and large windows. Stays include a complimentary buffet breakfast, but there is a fee for parking.

The Brewhouse has their own restaurant (On Tap), with pub grub like beer-brined wings, specialty pizzas and a Blue Ribbon Burger. They have over 40 craft beers and signature cocktails. Game day specials too. Definitely worth a look if you’re visiting Milwaukee, enjoy good beer, and are planning a Brewers game.

Hampton Inn & Suites Milwaukee West (8201 West Greenfield Avenue, West Allis). Hampton says that “American Family Field ballgames are five minutes from our door via free shuttle.” So it’s clearly a selling point. Hampton Inns are generally pretty nice places, and this one includes a free hot breakfast, an indoor pool, EV charging, free parking, and even room service.

They don’t actually have a restaurant on the site (I don’t think), but there’s quite a few eateries right here, including Big Deal Burgers & Custard, Peace & Love Sourdough, McDonald’s (!), and the aforementioned Paulie’s Pub with their own shuttle. Win-win!

Sonesta Milwaukee West Wauwatosa (10499 West Innovation Drive, Wauwatosa). The Sonesta is actually a pet-friendly hotel, although I’m not sure what you’d do with your dog during the game. They also go above and beyond just a shuttle to games…the Sonesta offers a Brewers package, which includes a bucket of beer, complimentary transportation to the game, and a “ballpark buffet”…I’m not sure what that includes.

Sonesta has an indoor pool and hot tub, and free parking. It seems geared to business travelers, but hey, Brewers fans mean business. Their “Innovation” restaurant is closed as I write this, but Ally’s Power House Café is very close if a meal is in your plans.

 

Milwaukee brewers free shuttles to american family field

Because Red wants you to get to the ballgame safely.

Whew! Well there you have it fans; your complete list of shuttle options for Milwaukee Brewers home games. In case it matters to you, the Brewers offer a downloadable map of drop-off points at the ballpark; you can find that here.

Thanks for reading…I know I went long here! But plenty more where that came from. Check out more American Family Field tips here, including this useful post on parking at Brewers games, some helpful tailgating tips, and some info when you’re bringing the kids!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Prepaid Baseball Game Parking With SpotHero

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’ve read my ballpark tips for a while, you know that I will always recommend whether to use your car or public transit to a game. But if you’re driving and parking at or near the ballpark, you should always have a plan. You do NOT want to be driving around Baltimore or Boston looking for a decent and affordable spot. (I speak from experience!)

Using SpotHero makes the process simple, and even fun if you do it right!

baseball parking spothero

Sitting in ungodly slow traffic with a full bladder in Toronto or Washington can make for a memorable ballgame experience for the wrong reasons. You could also, of course, seriously overpay for parking if you go without a plan (see: Fenway Park).

So while I offer a lot of advice here, it does come down to booking in advance. This is especially the case if the ballpark is in the heart of the city, as many of the newer ones are. If most fans going to the game use public transit because of traffic and costs, SpotHero is your best bet for parking.

 

fenway park parking guide

You can do better than this. Stick with me.

What I love about SpotHero is that I can choose well ahead of time where I’d like to park, and I choose my spot based on a number of factors.

In Baltimore, for example, I find a garage near the Inner Harbor for a nice waterfront walk before or after the game.

In Pittsburgh, I find a spot near the other side of the Clemente Bridge, for a stunning approach to the ballpark.

In Boston, I get a spot near the Prudential Center…it’s a long walk, but I can also use Commuter Rail (or a Boston Pedicab!) and get off a fly ball away from the ballpark…at a lot where people paid five times as much as I did to park.

In Atlanta, I just want to be able to find my car after the game.

 

Ruppert Garage Yankee Stadium

And of course, you get the bonus of parking your own car. No one likes to park someone else’s at the game.

You can choose your spot based on the easiest exit, be near other city attractions or eateries, or simply go cheap.

Here’s a favorite trick of mine in several cities: if you’re making a day of visiting the city with your baseball, you can land a spot near a public transit station that will take you to the game and back (or the other way around). In some places, you can park close to the ballpark before the event rate kicks in, and enjoy a day in the city before the game. I’ve done this numerous times and saved a bundle.

SpotHero provides other details too, including if your car will be under elevated train tracks and may get oil spilled on it. (That’s a thing in Chicago. True.) Each spot description shows a star based review, whether you have in/out privileges, and even a photo of the lot or garage entrance so you know what it looks like, which is very helpful in a big city.

 

parking near rogers centre green p 40 york

This is a pretty sweet evening rate for baseball parking. Even in Canadian dollars.

Order the spot, get the address, put it in your map app, and go. Show your barcode at the entrance and you’re in. Easy peezy.

As some of you know, I used to be a fan of ParkWhiz. They aren’t bad, but I’ve definitely found that SpotHero offers a larger selection and is better for baseball game parking. When I found myself using SpotHero instead of ParkWhiz based on that, I switched my affiliation, and now SpotHero is the Official Prepaid Parking of Ballpark E-Guides!

(Again, that’s not really a thing, but it sounds good.)

 

camden yards parking orioles lots

So many choices. Who wants to think about it on game day?

In a downtown city ballpark especially, try SpotHero for your ballgame parking. Or any prepaid parking, for that matter.

And please use this link to tell ‘em Ballpark E-Guides sent you!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tips | Chicago White Sox

Posted by Kurt Smith

Planning to go to a Chicago White Sox baseball game? Here are my best Guaranteed Rate Field parking tips – including alternate routes, tavern shuttles, and of course, money saving advice!

Guaranteed Rate Field, unlike its neighbor Wrigley Field to the north, offers ample enough parking that getting there by car is generally easy enough, and in some cases preferable to getting there by CTA train or other means. (You can read all about that here.)

I’ve covered a lot here, so I’m breaking it down for you:

Alternate Routes to Guaranteed Rate Field
Chicago White Sox Parking Lots
Chicago White Sox Tailgating
Other Parking Lots + Street Parking
White Sox Tavern Shuttles

 

guaranteed rate field parking tips chicago white sox

I know, there are so many. Not to worry, I’ll help you pick a spot!

Okay, ready? Let’s get started after this quick word from our sponsor:

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alternate routes to white sox guaranteed rate field

Visualize yourself using the right exit!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #1: Alternate Routes to White Sox Games. Guaranteed Rate is located at Exit 55 (35th Street exit) off Interstate 90/94, also called the Dan Ryan Expressway. It is visible from the highway, and the parking lots at the ballpark are right there after exiting.

The Dan Ryan was once ranked by a heavy traffic research company as the second worst bottleneck of traffic in America. But the positive of such problems is that generous and busy Internet users post alternate routes, which can still be used today for high attendance games.

I haven’t tried these routes myself, but they might be worth a look if you don’t want to get caught up in the herd:

 

I-57 to white sox game alternate route

If you end up in Indiana, you’ve gone too far.

Going north on I-57 from the south: Exit at Halstead Street just before the merge with I-90/94. Turn left to go north on Halstead, then turn left on 95th St. (U.S. Route 12/20) and then right on Ashland Avenue. Follow Ashland all the way to 35th St., and then turn right towards the ballpark.

Going north on I-90/94 from south of the city: Instead of using exit 55A onto South LaSalle St., use exit 55B to S. LaSalle, and then make a left onto Pershing Road. From there you can make a right onto South Princeton Avenue towards the ballpark.

This route backwards, incidentally, can make for an easier exit. (I mean following the steps in reverse, not actually driving backwards.)

 

Alternate routes to chicago white sox games

They put a ramp there for you and everything. Chicago’s got your back!

Coming from the south using I-90 or I-94: Use the Stony Island Avenue exit (it’s closer to the park from I-90). Go north on Stony Island Avenue, following the signs to Lake Shore Drive (Stony Island turns into South Cornell Avenue and East 57th Street).

Head north on Lake Shore Drive (U.S. Route 41) to 31st Street, and make a left and head west on 31st. After passing under I-90/94, turn left on Wentworth and head south on Wentworth till you get to the ballpark.

 

alternate routes to guaranteed rate field events

Follow the smart people to the White Sox game!

Coming from southwest on I-55 (Stevenson Expressway) North: Use the South Ashland Avenue exit and make a right onto S. Ashland. Take S. Ashland to 35th St. and turn left towards the ballpark.

Coming from the west on I-290 (Eisenhower Expressway): Use the Ashland Avenue exit; head south on Ashland and make a left on 35th.

 

how to get to guaranteed rate field from O'Hare Airport

OK so the signs need some straightening, but you get the idea.

From the northwest/O’Hare: Use I-90 and merge with I-90/94 east, use the Roosevelt Road exit, and head west on Roosevelt to Halstead. Make a left on Halstead and head south until reaching 35th St. Turn left on 35th towards the ballpark.

Again, I would only use these if the I-90/94 Dan Ryan traffic is particularly bad. The Dan Ryan is supposedly much better since the construction period. In many cases, you can just use Halstead St. or Ashland Avenue if you’re looking for a back road.

 

illinois tollbooth

If you’re from metropolitan Chicago, you know.

One more thing about driving to Guaranteed Rate Field: coming from outside metropolitan Chicago, be sure to have an EZPass or IPass. Illinois rivals New Jersey in toll roads (and that’s saying something). If you don’t have a toll pass, just go to the Illinois Tollway website and look up your license plate.
 

 
chicago white sox official parking tips

Get a view of the city, and keep an eye on your car!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #2: White Sox Parking. The White Sox have a large amount of available parking in their official lots close to the ballpark, approximately 7,000 parking spaces. It’s usually enough, especially since plenty of fans use public transportation to go to games. You can view their parking info here.

As of 2023, the parking price is $27 when pre-paid, and $30 at the gate; for Sunday games that drops to $17 and $20 respectively. All of the Sox lots cost the same, so no need to waste time circling the park. The Sox sell their advance parking through ParkWhiz, and there’s a fee included, so there isn’t any savings buying in advance, but you’ll have a better spot.

Season ticket and multi-game plan members can buy their parking in advance at a cheaper price (about $5 less a game), and you might find a cheaper pass on eBay. The coupons require parking in a certain lot, so you can check the Sox website if you land one to see where to use it.

 

guaranteed rate field white sox parking

They don’t take cash anymore, but that’s not why I haven’t gone to a game since.

The signs directing drivers to the parking areas are color-coded for pre-paid coupons. The pre-paid red lots A, B, and C are north of the ballpark and are far more accessible to and from the Interstate; green lots F and L are west and south of the ballpark take longer to exit. You should probably get a pre-paid pass, just to be in a better spot.

If you haven’t bought a parking pass, keep in mind you’ll be parking in Lots F or L south of the ballpark, so plan your entrance accordingly. Also, don’t bother with cash…it’s credit cards or debit parking only on the day of game nowadays. I’ve read they’ll take cash, but the attendants won’t be happy about it.

The Sox open their lots two hours before first pitch on game days. If you’re early enough you don’t need to worry about pre-purchasing a spot, except for Opening Day or a Cubs game, but it’s only a buck or two more to do it.

Don’t wait till you get to the ballpark to get your Chicago White Sox gear…
Order your caps, jerseys, and more now at MLBShop.com and save!

Click here to order your White Sox gear today!

 

white sox overflow parking game days IIT

The Green Line station offers a fine view of additional parking.

If parking does fill up, which is rare, the Sox will provide shuttle service from The McCormick Place Garage C (29th Street and Fort Dearborn Drive), and at IIT east of the ballpark.

Lot A is now designated for rideshare service and bus parking; it stays open an hour after the game ends.

If you break down in the lot after the game, you can go to a Guest Relations booth or find a parking lot supervisor, and they’ll usually arrange for towing your car if needed.

Finally, if the game is postponed, you can use the parking coupon for a future game. Details on the back of the coupon.

 

chicago white sox parking tips

The parking lot is even closer than the train station!

Honestly, even though it’s pricey by major league baseball standards, my best advice for White Sox game parking is to buy a pre-paid pass and park in one of the official lots. Arrive early if you can to avoid the bottlenecks. If you want to save money and are including a meal with your game, try one of the tavern shuttles below.

And of course, remember you can book your parking anywhere in Chicago in advance with the pros at SpotHero.

Don’t Drive Around Chicago Looking For Parking…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

chicago parking spothero

Click here to book your Chicago parking in advance!

 

 
chicago white sox tailgating guaranteed rate field parking

“And at game time, the score is still zed-zed!”

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #3: White Sox Tailgating. The Sox encourage tailgating, even to the point of offering picnic tables and space for private tailgating parties. Should you gather a group for a party, the Sox give discounts for tickets and will even throw in some parking passes. No kegs, large grills, DJs, or loud music unfortunately. Remember to park your bus in Lot A.

The tailgating scene at the South Side is popular in White Sox fandom. It’s not quite at the level of American Family Field 90 miles north in Milwaukee, but often there will be bands playing, bag-throwing games or folks giving out freebies. Tailgating stops when the game starts and is not allowed after the game—and nor is bringing alcohol outside of the lot.

 

white sox tailgating party

Featuring ivy on the fence for that Chicago baseball experience!

There are restrooms near the main entrance of the park or in the ChiSox Bar & Grill restaurant that you can use, and there are receptacles in most lots to dump your hot coals.

If you’d like to reserve a tailgating spot from the White Sox for your baseball party, you can do that here. The nice part of that is that you can show up three hours before game time instead of two, so no need to slam those beers down on the clock.

Since the Sox reserve tailgating spaces in Lots B and E, that’s the place to wander around if you want to have a brew and sausage with tailgating Sox faithful.

 

 
guaranteed rate field parking satellite

And if you’re a VIP, we won’t park you in!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #4: Street Parking and Other Lots. You won’t have an easy time finding nearby street parking at the ballpark. Since the neighborhood has been condo-fied, street ordinances have been put in place to protect the locals’ parking spots. Parking without a residential parking permit in the wrong spot will get you a very stiff fine and a towing.

West of the park in the Halstead St. area are meters that only need to be fed until 6:00 PM, but you could have some difficulty finding these, and unless you live in the area, you may not be comfortable leaving your car there.

 

35th street red hots white sox parking

I had a very nice conversation with this lovely lady. Chicago folks are really cool.

Some residents and businesses west of the park on 35th, like the 35th Street Red Hots people, will sell you their parking spots, but you probably won’t find any real bargains—the main attraction is the easy exit after the game, so they claim. Not sure how, since you’re further from the interstate, but maybe it’s because it takes a while to empty those large White Sox lots.

 

white sox parking grandstand sports 35th street

What better way to sell White Sox gear than to offer game day parking?

The Grandstand store west of the ballpark on 35th has a lot across the street, and you’re close to a great Chicago sports team store with cool gear there if that interests you. I’m guessing stuff there is cheaper than at the ballpark.

I’ve read in forums that you can park for free on side streets off of 35th; just east of the Dan Ryan near IIT and the Green Line stop. That is where the neighborhood has reportedly improved, but it’s the south side of Chicago, so that one is up to you.

 

chicago white sox game parking chinatown

With the new pitch clock, you can make it back in three hours!

Try Chinatown… There is a parking lot near the Cermak-Chinatown Station of the CTA Red Line north of the park; parking there for ten hours is cheaper than at the ballpark and it’s a one-stop trip on the Red Line (it’s a long walk, about 15 blocks, I wouldn’t do it at night).

On weekdays you might be able to find cheap metered parking in the area, and even with the extra few bucks for the Red Line, it’s still a good deal.

There is even some free street parking in Chinatown (I’ve seen cars parked on Wentworth Street), if you have time to look around near the station a bit and get lucky. But if you see a sign that says “Don’t Park Here”, obey it.

 

chinatown chicago guaranteed rate field parking

Dumplings make great ballpark food.

There are also many places where you can grab a bite or fill up your goody bag in Chinatown; remember you can bring your own food into the ballpark.

For that matter, you could book a cheaper spot anywhere near the Red Line or Green Line if you’re comfortable with an area in Chicago, or want to be somewhere in the city after the game. Both lines have a station near the ballpark.

 

 
buffalo wings and rings white sox shuttle

Wings, beer, a free ride and a free shuttle to the White Sox game…and they even sponsor this comfortable Chicago street bench!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #5: White Sox Game Shuttles. So, where do you go if you don’t want to pay the parking fees? There are actually dining establishments in the area that will take you to the park:

 

buffalo wings and rings white sox shuttle bus

The shuttle bus beats walking!

Buffalo Wings and Rings on South Halstead St. west of the park runs a shuttle an hour before the game and will pick you up for 30 minutes after the game. They have free valet parking and parking in the back if there is space available, and there is also metered parking nearby on Halstead.

It’s ideal if you love beer and wings. Wings come in a large variety of flavors, including sweet Thai chili, lemon pepper, and (I’m not making this up) blueberry chipotle BBQ. Blueberry chipotle BBQ wings, beer and free parking…what could go better with White Sox baseball!

 

connies pizza white sox shuttle

You can even help them deliver a few pizzas on the way.

Connie’s Pizza The Bridgeport location of Connie’s Pizza offers free parking in their lot, and if you dine in their restaurant, they’ll give you a ride in their free shuttle bus. The bus runs for an hour before and after games.

Their pizza is no slouch of course…as I write this, it’s #322 of 10,820 Chicago restaurants on TripAdvisor, putting Connie’s in the something percentile which is pretty good in this town. It’s true deep dish pizza, and combined with a White Sox game is a full Chicago experience.

Connie’s also offers game day specials, so enjoy a beer or two before the game, especially since you won’t have to drive.

 

ricobene's white sox shuttle

With helpful instructions right there on the sign!

Note: I contacted the Ricobene’s folks and they’re not offering shuttle service to White Sox games at the moment. Nuts. But I’m leaving this here in case things change. You can tell them I sent you!

Ricobene’s The Ricobene’s restaurant on West 26th St. has a free shuttle to Sox games for patrons; they draw pretty good crowds on Sox game nights not just for the shuttle but for the food; the hefty breaded steak sandwich and pizzas are especially popular. Check out the Yelp reviews…this place is revered.

Ricobene’s has ample parking with a lot under I-90 and there’s some street parking nearby, and reportedly they’re very good about accommodating anyone who needs a lift to the game, even for leaving the game early.

 

reggies rock bus chicago white sox

You can’t not want to ride in the Reggies Rock Bus. (photo courtesy of Reggies Live)

Reggies Live on South State St. is a good hike away from the park but will take patrons to and from Sox games on their own very cool-looking “Reggies Rock Bus”. It’s just a block away from the Chinatown station on the Red Line or the Cermak-McCormick Place station on the Green Line. You can use those if you don’t want to wait or if you miss the bus after the game.

There is some metered parking on State St., but it is difficult to find, and there is a cover to get in, so this is best for folks interested in a show or a party after the game. That said, lots of folks will tell you Reggies is worth it.

Reggie’s occasionally even throws in a package that includes free bleacher ticket to the game and a BBQ with the ride, so it can make for a pretty cool and economical Chicago evening. You can hang out in the music club or on a rooftop deck (there’s even a retro record store), and the wings here are mighty popular.

A meal and a ride to the ballgame is great, but these things tend to be shaky…I would check with any of these establishments before making them part of your game plan, even though I’m sharing these four because they seem to be consistent.

 

Chicago white sox parking tips guaranteed rate field

“And then when the game’s over, we’ll be the first ones out! We’re Griswolds!”

There you go my friends, all of my best tips for Chicago White Sox game parking. Hope you found it useful…stay tuned, I’ll soon be offering other ways to get to games at the new Comiskey Park.

Thanks for reading, and if you need more Guaranteed Rate Field game tips, click here! Check out this great post for choosing a seat, and see some great food options here.

(And click here for some great tips for Chicago Cubs home games!)

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Tropicana Field Parking Guide | Tampa Bay Rays

Posted by Kurt Smith

Here it is Rays fans and Tampa Bay visitors…your complete Tropicana Field parking guide for your next Rays baseball game! I’m here to help you find the best Rays parking…whether you’re looking to be close to the ballpark, save some money, enjoy a pre- or post-game party, or even take advantage of the useful shuttles to the Trop.

I’m even throwing in some alternate routes, to help you with the much-maligned traffic problem in Tampa Bay.

You actually have a lot of options, so I’m breaking this down:

Alternate Routes to Tropicana Field
Tampa Bay Rays Parking
Ferg’s Parking For Rays Games
Satellite Tropicana Field Parking Lots + Garages
Free And Cheap Street Parking
The Baseball Shuttle and Pier Parking
The SunRunner
The Brew Bus
The Cross-Bay Ferry

Okay here we go, after this highly applicable bit of advice from our sponsor:

Never Drive To Tropicana Field Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
Alternate routes to tampa bay rays games

All roads lead right…to congestion.

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #1) Alternate Routes to Rays Games. Driving to the Trop is simple enough in theory. The Trop is easily accessible by I-275 at exits 21 and 23B (I-175 and I-375 also feed into the ballpark area), and the big white dome is visible for miles. The Rays have a nice little parking map on their website with some helpful info.

That said, traffic can be a major issue on weeknights, especially for folks coming from Tampa or Orlando. This is one of the bigger knocks on the location of the ballpark…and one oft-cited reason for chronic low attendance despite a perennially good team.

Coming from east of the bay, I highly suggest leaving early, before rush hour if you can. Having driven on I-4 (the route of Disney-destined tourists), I’d far rather pay the toll for a lesser-used route. If you don’t have one, it’s definitely a good idea to get a SunPass to avoid sitting at tollbooths (EZPass works fine if you’re not a Floridian).

 

alternate routes to Tropicana Field

Don’t believe the hype…there’s alternatives!

Here are some suggestions for avoiding traffic that I’ve read. I haven’t tried these, so don’t hold me to them, but they might help.

Coming from the north, you can get off I-275 at 22nd Avenue and make a right onto 16th Street; this could route you past I-275 backups, and the Trop itself is on 16th Street South.

Coming from south Tampa, using Gandy Boulevard (CR-600 or U.S. 92) over the Gandy Bridge to 4th Street (also U.S. 92) is reportedly a bit easier than using I-275 and the Howard Frankland Bridge over Tampa Bay. It doesn’t look easier on a map, but people say traffic really moves.

Coming from areas south of St. Petersburg, like Bradenton, etc., drivers have to use I-275 over the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, which costs a small toll. From the south you can exit I-275 at 26th Avenue, make a right onto 26th, and then a left onto 16th towards the ballpark. Or you could use the 31st Street exit and make a right onto 5th Street.

If traffic is particularly bad, you can use the 54th Street exit, make a left onto 31st and a right onto 26th.

Here’s Tropicana Field on Google Maps to help you visualize all of this.

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Tropicana Field Parking Guide Tampa Bay Rays

See it? You can just make it out through the trees.

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #2) Tampa Bay Rays Parking. There are about 7,000 spaces directly at the Trop. The Rays sell prepaid parking passes on their website, but you probably won’t need it for most games if you’re here an hour or more before game time, especially on a weeknight. Like with tickets, parking for premium games (Yankees, Red Sox, World Series, etc.) is more expensive.

“Premier” lots 1 and 5, with easy access in and out, are a few bucks more than the other lots, and these are lots that people usually prepay for (and they will tell you it’s worth the few extra bucks). The Rays don’t accept cash payment for parking anymore, so borrow someone’s credit card.

The Rays offer wheelchair and accessible parking spaces in Lots 1 and 7. They are very well laid out and close to the center field and home plate entrances. They also have a drop-off area at the corner of 4th Avenue and 16th Street, near the home plate entrance (which is not the rotunda, btw).

Tailgating is permitted in the Rays general parking lots, and there are port-a-potties available for relief. It’s nowhere near Milwaukee as far as the scene, but a few folks set up grills and eat and drink beforehand. On occasion there is entertainment outside.

 
ferg's sports bar rays parking

I’m here for the good times…AND the convenient parking!

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #3) Ferg’s Sports Bar. Outside of the Rays parking lots there is some parking at Ferg’s, the popular post-game hangout that is close enough to the Trop to make the parking price a relative bargain. It’s literally right there at the ballpark…it’s actually closer than some of the Rays’ official lots. They even have tunnel access from the venue to the ballpark, great for those stormy Florida days.

Ferg’s will occasionally give discount coupons for their tavern to folks that park there. Perfect if you were including some time at Ferg’s in your plans, as many Rays fans do…they’ve got craft beers, burgers and wings, and 90-something TV sets.

Ferg’s is a big and popular place with a great location, and if you’re into sports bars and pre- or post-game libations you’ll love it. Even if you’re not doing a party, Ferg’s might be the best value for Tropicana Field parking.

 
tropicana field parking st. petersburg lots johns hopkins middle school

You don’t need a middle school education to park within view of Tropicana Field!

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #4) City Lots. If you don’t mind walking a bit in downtown St. Petersburg for a cheaper option, there are an additional 4,000 spaces in nearby street lots. East of the ballpark along 1st Avenue, or north of the Trop along 16th Street, there are several St. Petersburg-approved lots that can be much cheaper than the Rays lots on game nights.

Keep in mind that the Rays’ lots east of the ballpark are fairly large, so if you choose one of these it could be at least a 5-10 minute walk to get to the rotunda entrance. Several fans online have recommended the Johns Hopkins Middle School parking lot southwest of the Trop. It’s among the cheaper options and just a half mile walk.

You can look for the signs with a blue P; this means the lot is city-approved. Most lots charge about half or what the Trop charges, so if there are less than three of you this is a better deal. No tailgating though.

 
street parking for tampa bay rays games

It might be cool to have Elvis tow your car, but I doubt it would be worth the price.

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #5) Street Parking. Near the shuttle stop at the Pier, or north of the ballpark on Central Avenue, you might find some metered parking that is deactivated for the evening, but unless you see something that says it is, don’t try a metered spot either here or near the Trop.

Most meters only have enough time for two hours and run until 11:00 PM. I’ve read differing accounts on how tough St. Petersburg is on street parking regulations; just pay a few bucks for a lot if you’re not certain. Garages at the waterfront are cheap and a better option, as I’ll discuss in a moment.

According to the St. Pete Times, there is some free street parking on 3rd Avenue South between 4th and 8th Streets. They admit it’s at least a five-block walk, but the exercise can’t hurt. There’s also reportedly free street parking on 2nd Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets.

 

tampa bay rays parking pedestrian overpass

With a helpful police officer to direct you across the street afterward.

On the south side of the Trop is a handicapped accessible pedestrian overpass that was built to enable people living in the Campbell Park area to cross I-175 to get to Rays games. There are two parking lots in the park there (not sure what they cost if anything), and it’s fairly close to the ballpark with a nice view crossing a highway. I might not do it at night (I’ve read it isn’t the best of areas), but it could be pleasant for day games.

If you’re taking a bus with a group, the city will let you park for free on 4th Avenue South, between 9th and 10th Streets.

As far as other free parking options, I’ve read some tips in the Reddit world. Suggestions include north of the ballpark on Burlington Avenue, between 14th and 15th Streets (this is a hike), and some of the side streets close to the pier (this is an even longer hike, but check out the shuttles bit coming). Honestly it’s probably not going to be worth the trouble here.

 
tampa bay rays baseball shuttle

“Have mercy…been waitin’ for the baseball shuttle all day…”

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #6) Baseball Shuttle. For all home games now, even games that have a post-game concert, the Rays and St. Petersburg offer a free Baseball Shuttle (also called the Baseball Looper Trolley) that runs from 2nd St. between Central and First Avenues (under the pedestrian bridge), and from 16th Street just south of 3rd Avenue to the ballpark.

The shuttle starts picking up passengers 90 minutes before the game, and runs for one hour after the game, with service approximately every 5-10 minutes. It will also continue to run after a post-game concert.

I’ve used the baseball shuttle with a family of four, and I’m a big fan. Nothing like very cheap parking and much less congestion. You might be waiting a bit after the game, but otherwise it’s well worth it.

 

st. petersburg downtown looper

The schedule sign is kind of tough to read driving by it. I’d pull over for a good look.

If the Baseball Shuttle isn’t running (the policy changes from season to season for which games it’s available), the PSTA Central Avenue Trolley bus runs from the pier and along Central Avenue, with a couple of stops near the Trop.

This can be used on Friday and Saturday nights for a tiny fee, and there is inexpensive parking near the Pier, but check the schedule to make sure you can get back on time. If you’re out of the ballpark by 10:30 or so you should be fine, although extra innings might be a problem.

The shuttles are nice because you have dining and entertainment options downtown before or after the game; but again, check the schedule.

Incidentally, several PSTA bus routes stop at 1st Avenue and 2nd Street north of the shuttle; might not be bad for a weekend game if the PSTA schedule permits.

There are several major lots near the Baseball Shuttle pickup location:

 

al lang field topricana field parking

Real progress is naming a minor league ballpark after an actual person!

Rays Shuttle Parking: Al Lang Stadium. Al Lang Stadium (formerly Progress Energy Park) has a fair amount of inexpensive parking right at the Pier, and it’s a short walk to the Shuttle stop. You can usually park all day for a small fee at Al Lang, so if you want to include a visit to the Salvador Dali museum across the street it’s very convenient.

 

Tropicana field parking sundial garage

“Duck!”

Rays Shuttle Parking: Sundial Parking Garage. The Sundial is for the entertainment complex located on the corner of 2nd St. and 2nd Avenue North. It is at the shuttle stop, and the walkway to get to it is well lit at night. The easiest entrance to this lot is traveling south on 2nd St.

According to the nice lady I contacted from the Pier, the event rate doesn’t apply to Rays games because of the distance, but it does kick in for outings at the Pier. Something to be mindful of, although the event rate isn’t usually too high. If there isn’t anything going on, parking is cheap.

 

Tampa bay rays parking south core garage

You don’t need to have a car as small as a Smart car, but I wouldn’t try parking a FedEx truck here.

Rays Shuttle Parking: South Core Garage. The South Core Garage is located right off of 1st Avenue South, a block away from the pier. This is also close to the shuttle and inexpensive; as with the Sundial garage, the event rate kicks in for local events but not ballgames.

Generally the South Core Garage fills up on Opening Day, so have a backup plan if you need it; most of the time the overflow goes to the Sundial.

 
st. petersburg sunrunner rays games

Showing team spirit no less! (photo courtesy of PSTA)

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #7) The SunRunner. PSTA (Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority) has added a nice new service that makes getting to Rays games a bit easier. The SunRunner is an eco-friendly bus that uses designated lanes to bypass traffic. Even better, at the moment it’s free (that may change after 2023). It stops on the north side of Tropicana Field.

The SunRunner’s route extends from St. Pete Beach to near the Pier and Cross Bay Ferry. It also stops near the Albert Whitted Airport if you’re flying in for a game. It is a pretty long route, so there’s plenty places to park along it. Plan ahead and park near a good restaurant or attraction (there are plenty of them).

There’s two advantages to using the SunRunner. The first is that with separate lanes for its route, it avoids ballgame traffic that your car can’t. The second is that you can save on parking, without adding to your walk. Brilliant!

The PSTA folks tout “free on-street parking” as one of your options using the SunRunner. I’m sure that’s true, but if you don’t know the area you can use a public lot or garage near the route. It should be easy to find something cheap.

The SunRunner runs until midnight. You should be easily able to make it back, especially with ballgames being faster these days. Buses run every 30 minutes after 8:00 PM.

 

I haven’t yet found an easy solution for avoiding traffic and wasting gas going to a Rays game. There’s not much as far as public transportation from outside St. Petersburg. But here are some options if you’re across the bay (and if you share this annoyance with other fans in the area):

 
Brew bus tours to rays games

And of course, you feel smart riding on this bus. (photo courtesy of Brew Bus Tours)

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #8) The Brew Bus. The Brew Bus people are based in several Florida cities. Their focus is providing transportation to folks that want to tour breweries in South Florida or Tampa Bay, but they offer shuttle service to Tropicana Field for select regular season games.

They’ll take you from Cigar City Brewing in Tampa (you can park there for free) to Ferg’s across the street from the Trop and back afterward. They throw your game ticket and a couple of beers in the package too. Good craft beers too, not the generic stuff. So this is extra cool, especially to avoid navigating through the traffic and finding a spot.

The price is reasonable for everything included, and the Brew Bus people are popular with locals. You may decide you’d like to do a brewery tour with them sometime.

The bus leaves to go back 20 minutes after the game, so be sure to be back by then.

 
pier parking tropicana field

Being so close to the pier opens up options!

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #9) The Cross-Bay Ferry. OK, maybe it isn’t a parking tip, but just putting this out there.

The Cross-Bay Ferry runs from the Tampa Convention Center and drops riders off near the St. Petersburg Pier. Presumably from there you could use the Baseball Shuttle or the SunRunner to get to the ballpark. You should be able to find parking near the Convention Center easily enough, although I don’t know if it would be free.

Unfortunately the ferry doesn’t run late enough to make it viable for weeknight games, and on weekends traffic isn’t that bad from Tampa anyway. It might be nice for a romantic outing or something, but it won’t save you any traffic headaches or money.

 

tropicana field parking tips

Baseball. Parking. The two just go together.

There you go baseball fans…your exhaustive user-friendly guide to parking at Tropicana Field! I hope you’ve found this useful for all your future Tampa Bay Rays games, and I gave you some options you might not have known about. Remember, getting to the ballpark is half the fun!

Click here for some more Tropicana Field tips…and thanks for reading. Please support Ballpark E-Guides sponsors, and keep this website rolling!

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Progressive Field Parking Guide | Cleveland Guardians

Posted by Kurt Smith

You need a plan when you’re attending a Guardians game…I’m here to help, with this detailed and useful Progressive Field parking guide! This page is full of great Cleveland Guardians game parking tips, whether you’re looking to save money, be close to the ballpark, get an easier out after the game, or enjoy a meal and drink with your baseball.

(Need more Progressive Field help? Check out this guide to finding a great seat, and this post about the amazing food selection at the home of the Guardians!

 

progressive field parking guide cleveland guardians

Well this is helpful…I guess I’ll take a picture and use that next time.

There’s a wide variety of options, so I’ve broken it down (but read it all if you can, great tips here!):

Progressive Field Parking Tips

Alternate Routes To Cleveland Guardians Games
General Parking Notes
Gateway East Garage
East 9th Street Parking Lots
Nearby Restaurant Parking
Tower City Garage
Other Third Party Lots
Free and Cheap Street Parking
Shuttles to Progressive Field

Ready? Okay great…but first, this highly applicable bit of advice from our sponsor: book your Guardians game parking passes in advance with SpotHero!

Never drive to Progressive Field without a plan…

Book your parking spot now with my friends at SpotHero!

 
alternate routes to guardians ballpark

You want to be where all of these cars aren’t.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #1) Alternate Routes to Progressive Field. I love the GPS apps you can use to get places these days, but they often underestimate how long it takes to get through city traffic, so I’m offering some alternate routes to the ballpark here.

Progressive Field is easy enough to get to from I-90 and I-71 (which are the same road near the ballpark) from the southwest, and on I-77 from the southeast. However, there isn’t a super-sized parking facility located at the ballpark, so you don’t necessarily want to just put “Progressive Field” in your GPS.

Auto and pedestrian traffic can get heavy, and the Guardians suggest avoiding the streets bordering the ballpark close to game time (and I second that).

Since Progressive Field is located at several interstate exits and most people will be using those, you can try approaching the ballpark from the north or west.

 

progressive field parking guide alternate routes

There’s lots of roads you can use. In fact, use them all and practice!

From I-77, for example, you can use the East 14th St. exit and stay on East 14th to Prospect Avenue, and then make a left onto Prospect and nearby slightly cheaper parking. From I-90 there is now an East 9th Street exit, but you can also use the East 22nd Street exit, and head north on East 22nd to Prospect.

Most people use East 9th, and there isn’t much in the way of parking on the west side of the park (Ontario Street) until you get near Tower City. If you can find a way to approach the ballpark from the north or east using the Shoreway (Ohio Route 2 from I-90 east of the ballpark, and U.S. 6/20 west of the park), you may have an easier time of it, especially with construction going on.

 

rocket mortgage field house guardians parking

Oh yeah, did I mention there could be another thing people are coming to see?

You should definitely be aware if there is a Cavaliers home game. The Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse is just a few feet away from Progressive Field, and decent parking becomes scarcer when both teams are playing or if there is another event going on. If the Cavs are home that night, you should either get there very early, or consider using RTA rail.

Leaving the ballpark, unless you’re parked right off of the Interstate, it might be easier to head north on East 9th and then make a right onto Superior Avenue to get to I-90. From I-90 you can easily access I-77 and I-71.

The city has removed the direct entrance to I-77 from E. 9th (you’ll thank them); you can now hop on the interstate from Orange Avenue and you can detour onto Broadway Avenue if Orange is too congested.

Here’s the Google map of the Progressive Field area to help you visualize all of this.

 

 
progressive field parking for cleveland guardians games

Getting to this point is pretty much the easy part.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #2) General Parking Notes. There isn’t a lot of area parking that’s run by the team, but there are numerous lots in the downtown Cleveland area that work fine for a ballgame.

The Guardians claim that there is enough entertainment complex parking to accommodate a simultaneous Guardians and Cavaliers sellout. The key phrase there is “in the area”—that could mean you’ll be walking a little bit; and expect a price hike if the Cavs are in the playoffs. (Again, if both teams are playing, I suggest using rapid transit if you can.)

Parking prices for most Guardians games ranges from $10 to $50 as of this writing. It isn’t difficult to find a decent spot at a good price, so long as you don’t grab the first thing you see, especially coming from I-77. Prices will increase in many lots if the Yankees or another high-value opponent is in town.

For a weekday game, you should arrive earlier and use the Gateway East lot, since most of the other lots will be filled with commuters. You can (and should) book a parking space ahead of time for an easier entrance, either through the Guardians or my friends at SpotHero.

Here’s the lowdown on popular parking options:

 

 
cleveland guardians parking gateway east garage

Having windows at the stairways is an underrated parking garage feature.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #3) Gateway East Garage. The closest thing to a main Guardians garage is the Gateway East garage, which is among the largest and most convenient, abutting Progressive Field on Larry Doby Way (formerly Eagle Avenue).

If you’re not overly concerned about the price, and it’s reasonable, this is as good a spot as any and not too far from the highways. The price is usually consistent regardless of opponent or what’s happening in the area, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t arrive earlier (and buy a pass beforehand) when an event is going on at Rocket Mortgage Field House, or on fireworks nights. The lower levels are reserved for employees of both venues, so you’ll be using the upper levels, but there is an elevator.

Very important note! In 2023, with construction in the downtown area, the Guardians have warned that there is a limited number of spaces in the Gateway East garage. When buying game tickets through the team, if there are spaces available, they will offer passes to you. If you’d like to park here, definitely get the pass!

All things considered, the Gateway East garage is probably the best parking spot at Progressive Field, especially if you’re a newbie.

Gametime has your cheap Guardians tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

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progressive field parking guide east 9th cleveland guardians

With a helpful picture of the ballpark on the sign!

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #4) East 9th Street Lots. If you want to be close to the ballpark and interstates, and don’t care about the price, the best bet is the lot on the corner of East 9th St. and Carnegie Avenue (G49 on Google Maps), or at the Hilton Garden Inn across the street. Both are across the street from the ballpark and exit easily onto I-90 or I-77. You will pay more for this privilege, however, at least as much as any other lot.

The parking lot at the Cross Country Mortgage building at the corner of East 9th and Bolivar might be slightly cheaper, and you can’t beat the convenience of being this close to the center field entrance and the amazing food selection in the ballpark.

There are a couple of lots just north of Bolivar on E. 9th, and they’re close too, but these will charge about as much as the closer lots to the interstate. You can go a couple blocks further north on E. 9th and usually find cheaper lots. After the game you can use the aforementioned route to I-90 via Superior Ave; Superior is U.S. 6/322 from E. 9th.

 

 
thirsty parrot cleveland guardians parking

Just hand over your cash to that guy sitting in the car there.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #5) Nearby Restaurants. There are several restaurants a short walk from Progressive Field with event parking spots nearby. These are higher in price than the Gateway East garage, but they are very convenient to the ballpark and these joints are known for being fun places to celebrate a Guardians victory. Both charge less earlier in the day, but they’ll kick you out or make you pay the event rate once the time comes.

Here’s a few links to restaurants near Progressive Field that have nearby lots, and their specialties (I’ve included the address of the parking lot, not the restaurant):

Thirsty Parrot (lot at 811 Bolivar Road) – Pre- and post-game parties, limited menu of burgers, sandwiches, and appetizers.

Headliner Bar & Eatery (lot at 501 Huron Road East) – Restaurant for the Hotel Indigo, high end tavern and dining.

Flannery’s Pub (lot at 2065 East 3rd Street) – Craft beers, handcrafted cocktails, burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Mabel’s BBQ is also close to this lot – Cleveland style BBQ (with Bertman’s mustard as a BBQ sauce ingredient), brisket, sandwiches and sides, beer and cocktails.

 

harry buffalo progressive field parking

Someone say hairy buffalo? Now I’m hungry!

Harry Buffalo (lot at 2118 East 4th Street) – Burgers, sandwiches, pizza, wings, tacos, and appetizers, and weekday specials. Primo African Quisine is also near this lot – Grilled lamb and seafood entrees, traditional African dishes, sandwiches and appetizers, craft beers and fancy drinks.

Clevelander Bar & Grill (lot at 750 Huron Road East) – Burgers, sandwiches, wings, and appetizers; beer and drinks.

Those are a few for you, but there’s plenty of bars and eateries in the area north of the ballpark; you can use these addresses when booking your parking on SpotHero.

 

 
tower city cleveland guardians parking

The parking garage is just a bonus.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #6) Tower City Garage. The Tower City center parking garage is a fair amount of walking from the ballpark, but the nice thing is that the walkway is indoors all the way from the Tower complex to the Cavs’ arena. The garage is located off of Huron Road.

Parking is cheaper here than nearby lots, it’s often good for all day, and you can spend some time in the Tower City shopping center. It’s also easier to get to the interstates after the game, especially since the crowd will be mostly cleared out by the time you get to the garage. Since the RTA public transit station is at Tower City, you’ll see plenty of baseball fans walking there after the game.

The other benefit of parking here is that there are a lot of eateries in Tower City; you can grab a cheaper bite or fill up your goody bag with less expensive food for the game. The Tower City garage is probably your best option for cheap parking at a Guardians game.

 

 
p[rogressive field parking st maron church

Even saints eventually end their shift.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #7) Other Lots. Carnegie Avenue has several convenient lots that are fairly reasonable. The Wolstein Center further east (home of Cleveland State University sports) has an affordable lot and is an easy exit onto I-90 from East 21st. This is about a 15-minute walk on a busy street, so it should be fine at night; just check that there isn’t an event happening there.

On Carnegie Avenue east of the ballpark is the St. Maron Catholic Church, which allows parking in its covered lot for non-Sunday games. The location is great, and it’s also an easy exit onto the highway. And what could be safer than having Jesus watch over your car? I’ve also mentioned the Hilton Garden Inn lot, which in some cases can be half the price of lots across the street. You can usually book these on SpotHero.

 

cleveland guardians parking halle garage

You literally can’t even be a tall person in this garage.

The Halle Garage on Huron Avenue is cheaper and a 5-minute walk, but it does get some poor reviews for its lack of space inside. There are other lots on East 14th St.; if you don’t mind passing by a cemetery at night. With the new ramp on East 14th, these should be an easier exit onto I-77.

North and east of the ballpark on St. Clair Avenue are close to a dozen lots that you can book very cheaply. These are about a mile from the ballpark though, and not in a great area. I would avoid these for a night game especially, even though they’re cheap.

 

progressive field parking guide unsafe spots

When they tell you what to do in the event of a break-in, it’s probably not a great spot.

Some of the lots in the Prospect/Bolivar/East 14th St. area, are also in less safe areas of downtown. I’ve read some reviews from folks whose cars were broken into, and you will frequently see orange signs imploring you to “put your junk in your trunk” (which I would think is obvious anywhere).

The lots are usually cheap, but if cheap means more to you than convenience, I would go for the lots east of the ballpark on Carnegie Avenue.

 

cleveland guardians parking jacks casino

Don’t buy into this. They still charge for parking.

The JACK Casino at Public Square charges for parking on game days; it’s not a good option and not any cheaper for the distance. The lot is open 24/7, if you’d like to enjoy some slots before or after the game. Parking is free for members or folks who play enough to earn points for it, but it will probably cost you more than it’s worth. I’ve read that it can be very slow exiting after games as well.

Ultimately remember that the most used highway ramps are from East 9th Street and Carnegie Avenue. Use any parking spot closer to another exit for an easier out.

 

 
cheap free street parking progressive field cleveland guardians

The trick is to just act like you do it all the time.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #8) Cheap Or Free Street Parking. You won’t find any place to park for free nearby on East 9th St. close to game time, but there are spots on side streets where you can park on the street at certain times.

On Prospect Avenue near the watering holes are metered spots which become free after 6:00 PM, so you can feed the meter cheaply until then. Many meters are inactive on weekends and holidays, so you could land a free spot for a weekend game if you’re early. The city bans a lot of street parking before playoff and high demand games.

Carnegie Avenue east of the ballpark also has parking on the street for free on evenings and weekends, and it’s a great spot, but you will need some good timing to land one of these for a ballgame.

 

downtown cleveland parking meter rates

I wish they would make up their minds.

On Huron Road East near Tower City there is parking that is free after 6:00; if you can’t find anything there, try the numbered streets like East 6th, north of the ballpark, or Chester Avenue off of East 9th. You can find some street parking on East 2nd Street for night games.

As always with street parking, be careful that you’re parking on the right side of the street, and that the regulations are clear on any applicable sign. If it’s confusing, it’s probably designed to be. And put your junk in your trunk.

 

 
flat iron cafe guardians shuttle

This is the way to go to a baseball game.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #9) Guardians Game Shuttles. Ballpark E-Guides always goes the extra mile, so I’m adding a couple shuttle options you can use to save some cash. I highly recommend the first for a pre-game meal and drink:

Flat Iron Café The Flatty, as regulars call it, is an Irish pub located on Center Street near U.S. 6-20; they have a shuttle that I believe runs for all of the Guardians home games. Parking is free on the street after 6:00 PM and on weekends, or you can use a very inexpensive lot across the street. To use the shuttle, you have to spend a small amount in the restaurant.

The menu is Irish pub fare, burgers, sandwiches, wings, and appetizers like giant onion rings, fish and chips and potato skins. Good variety and prices are reasonable, and there’s beer of course. It draws a larger crowd on game nights; some Guardians fans use the shuttle regularly.

For the most part people who share opinions online think very highly of the Flatty. The location also makes it a much easier exit after the game, especially heading west.

As of this moment the Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Fatty Wagon isn’t running, but that may change. Drop a line if you hear anything.

 

RTA trolley cleveland guardians

Because a smile doesn’t cost anything!

RTA Trolleys RTA has two free downtown trolleys—the E-Line and B-Line—that have stops at Tower City; they are free to ride but are available only during the day on weekdays.

If you can score some free parking near a trolley stop on a weekday, it’s a nice deal, but again, this is only for weekday games, of which there aren’t many. The Guardians and the city do often suggest the use of trolleys for Opening Day, though, should you be lucky enough to attend. Not a bad idea considering that most nearby lots will be full and expensive.

 

cleveland guardians game parking

If you can’t find the ballpark from here, I don’t know what to tell you.

There you have it my friends…your complete and handy guide for parking at Progressive Field to see your Cleveland Guardians. I hope this was helpful to you…and be sure to read my Progressive Field guide for lots more great Guardians baseball game tips!

Oh…and be sure to Follow Ballpark E-Guides on Facebook for more great tips for your next ballpark visit!

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5 Milwaukee Brewers Parking Tips | American Family Field

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning a trip to a Milwaukee Brewers home game, or even if you’re a regular at American Family Field, here are some essential Brewers parking tips. There’s some valuable info here you should know…most importantly, that American Family Field is a very big tailgating destination. (More about that here.)

Here are five helpful tips for parking for Brewers game days, after a quick word from our sponsor:

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american family field parking tips milwaukee brewers

Try to get here before all of these nice people do.

American Family Field Parking Tip #1) Arrive as early as you can. All of the lots open three hours prior to the game. You’ll see a long line of cars waiting for the parking gates to open, as Brewers fans itch to fire up the grill. One reason to get there early, other than joining the party, is to keep from sitting in your car for too long.

The American Family Field parking lots have over 12,000 spaces. For most games, you shouldn’t have a problem landing a parking spot. But if you want a decent spot, less walking and a lesser wait, you will need to get there about three hours or more prior to game time. For prime games like Opening Day or against the Chicago Cubs, you’ll need to get there sooner than that.

 

helfaer field american family field brewers

And because you’re early, you can get a good seat!

There’s things to do, outside of drinking beer, grilling sausages or throwing frisbees, to keep yourself or the kids busy before the first pitch. If you’re a baseball history buff, see the statues for Hank Aaron, Robin Yount, Bud Selig, and Bob Uecker. In Brewers Lot 1, the Brewers marked the spot where Hank Aaron’s 755th home run landed. There’s also a memorial to three workers who lost their lives in the 1999 crane collapse during the ballpark’s construction.

Helfaer Field is a baseball field near the main entrance of the ballpark, on the footprint of old County Stadium. There’s usually activity going on you can watch, and a kids playground nearby. Or obviously you can join the tailgating party. It beats sitting in your car waiting for the long line.

 

milwaukee brewers preferred parking

Parking at the Hot Corner? Heck yes!

American Family Field Parking Tip #2) Book your parking in advance (and spring for preferred parking lots). The Brewers have a colorful parking map on their website. Their parking lots are named after Brewers greats like Yount, Molitor, Thomas and others.

Milwaukee Brewers parking is relatively inexpensive by baseball standards, although it is pricier for weekend and Marquee games. For a few extra dollars, you can get a preferred spot. As of 2023, general parking rates range from $13 to $40. Preferred parking passes especially are significantly cheaper when you order in advance.

Most of the Preferred lots are just off of I-94, and surround Helfaer Field and the home plate entrance. They also include the Miller and Gantner lots off of 44th Street. Preferred parking is closer to the ballpark, with easier access to I-94 afterward. Most fans will tell you it’s worth the few extra bucks.

The Molitor lot is usually an easier exit than the Yount or Uecker lots. Use the Aaron or Thomas lot to be close to the home plate gate.

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milwaukee brewers parking american family field

Welcome to the grand parking lots!

If you’re not in a preferred lot, you’ll likely have to walk on a pedestrian bridge to cross either the Menomonee River or I-94, and it’s a fair bit of walking. There’s nothing wrong with the scenery though—at the foot of the bridge crossing I-94 are blocks of Brewers history, and crossing the Menomonee passes by the Sausage Haus and tailgate pavilions.

Like the Uecker seats inside the ballpark, there’s also a Uecker Lot. It’s in the southeast corner of the cheaper lots, and it is probably the furthest from the park. If you have mobility troubles, you can use a shuttle service that the Brewers provide; call their Guest Relations hotline.

For groups on a bus or RV, the American Family Lot just south of the ballpark is dedicated for bus parking. It costs a chunk of change, but again, you can order parking in advance at a significant discount. The oversized vehicles lot does not have tailgating grids, but people still party there.

 

Milwaukee brewers motorcycle parking

The home of Harley-Davidson has to have a motorcycle parking lot at their ballpark.

If you need accessible parking spaces, they’re in the preferred lots close to the home plate entrance. Motorcyclists can park in the Cooper lot near Helfaer Field.

Finally, while there is free parking on streets around the American Family Field area, it’s a ways from the ballpark. For free street parking at Brewers games, your best bet is probably north of the ballpark on Blue Mound Road, or the side streets off of Blue Mound.

If you don’t want to do the walk, you can use one of the tavern shuttle services, like from Kelly’s Bleachers. (You can read about a few of those here.)

 

American family field alternate routes

This is a lot of info to digest in a few seconds. Best to plan ahead.

American Family Field Parking Tip #3) Use the right route. American Family Field is so essential Milwaukee that it has its very own interchange, exit 308B directly off of I-94, called Stadium Way/Brewers Boulevard (formerly Miller Park Way). Stadium Way is only called such near the ballpark; north of I-94 it is U.S. Route 41, and if you go far enough south it becomes 43rd Street.

The roads circling the lots are Selig Drive to the north and Frederick Miller Way to the south; these driveways are accessible from several other roads in the area. Some of the connecting roads are one-way, inward before and outward after the game.

The Brewers provide directions on their website from each locality, from Green Bay to Chicago. They all end with getting to I-94 and exiting at the ballpark. Which is fine, but know that most everyone drives to American Family Field, and most of them use I-94. As I’ve said, if you’re not early enough, you could run into some traffic backups.

 

american family field alternate route

Because life rewards those on the road less traveled.

Skip this bit if you use Google Maps or another GPS and know where you’re going…but here’s a few alternate routes if you’re behind schedule:

– Coming from west on I-94, get off one exit early at 308A. (The exit is on the left side of the highway.) At the end of the ramp, turn right on Gen. Mitchell/Parkway Drive, which ends at Frederick Miller Way and the west lots.

– Coming from west or east, U.S. Route 18 runs parallel to I-94 north of the park; it is Blue Mound Road on the west side before it merges with Wisconsin Avenue to the east. From Blue Mound just west of Brewers Way, you can turn onto N. Story Parkway and then make a left onto Yount Drive. From Yount Drive you can quickly enter the less expensive Molitor lot, or take it to Selig Drive and the north preferred lots. Very few people use Yount Drive to get to the preferred lots, so you should have little waiting time.

You can also use General Mitchell Boulevard from Blue Mound, which ends at Fred Miller Way as described above.

– From the south or Mitchell Airport, try I-894/I-43 (the Airport Freeway) and exit at Loomis Road/WI-36 north. Turn left onto Loomis and make an immediate left onto 43rd St. 43rd becomes Stadium Way with not too much traffic.

– Coming from points east (including I-43), use Canal Street, which runs parallel to I-94. Canal Street leads directly to the ballpark (often with less traffic than I-94), where it turns into Fred Miller Way at the cheaper lots entrance. This is often an easier exit too.

– From the north on I-41, you can bypass the I-94 interchange and instead use I-43 south of the ballpark; from there you can exit at 43rd St./Stadium Way; you can enter via the easier-to-exit south lots.

One more thing: construction is frequent in Wisconsin. Pay attention to alerts if you can on the Wisconsin Department of Transportation website or @BernieBrewer.

 

Milwaukee brewers parking tailgating

They don’t mess around in Milwaukee.

American Family Field Parking Tip #4) Bring your tailgating supplies. You’ll want to participate in the tailgating. Smelling all of the sausages cooking will make you ravenous.

I’ve written a separate post about the amazing tailgating scene and what you should know, but this is just a reminder to bring supplies. People in discussion forums asking about Brewers games are told to get a disposable grill, charcoal and some Johnsonville, Usinger’s or Klement’s brats.

If you aren’t a tailgating pro (don’t worry; you’ll be surrounded by them), there are several places to find minimal survival equipment.

There is a Metcalfe’s Market on State Street north of the park that is a popular place to get brats. You can stop by Cousins Subs on Wisconsin Avenue or George Webb on Greenfield Avenue for sandwiches. There are a few more takeout joints south of the ballpark on Stadium Way/43rd Street.

The Milwaukee Public Market is a five minute drive away, and features lots of great stuff from local vendors. You can park there for free for a half hour if you can pick up your stuff fast.

Coming from Chicago on I-94, there is a Mars Cheese Castle tourist type of store in Kenosha that has any kind of links, cheese and snacks you need. Love that place…lots of great eats.

 

american family field parking tips

You have to let the racing sausages go by. Just saying.

American Family Field Parking Tip #5) Keep your eyes open when leaving. The tailgating party often continues after the game, as the lots gradually empty. People do sometimes leave grills (and other unmentionable stuff) out in the parking lot. On your way out it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for both people and equipment. The Brewers clear the lot an hour after the game.

Should your car fail to start after the game or if you lock your keys in it, MT Towing & Recovery will do their best to help you out free of charge, although you’ll have to spring for towing or repairs. Contact a police officer or Brewers Guest Relations (414-902-4900).

 

Milwaukee brewers guest relations

Ain’t nothing wrong with Guest Relations. Guest Relations is a beautiful thing.

Finally, if you’ve had a few too many and shouldn’t drive home, you can call the Brewers’ Guest Relations. They’ll order a cab ride for you if they see the need. Whether they’ll let you leave their car in the lot, you’d have to ask them. It is against Brewers policy, but they might allow it if you ask nicely and get your car out of there before the next game.

There you go my friends; hopefully that helps you in your next trip…remember, when it comes to attending Brewers games, preparation is everything!

 

Need More American Family Field – Milwaukee Brewers Game Tips?

If you need more help for your next visit to the home of the Milwaukee Brewers, check out my tips for newbies here, some helpful info on choosing a seat here and here, and some party areas and shuttles to the game.

Thanks for reading and supporting our sponsors, and feel free to drop me a line with any questions!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

How To Get To Yankee Stadium – Best Visitor’s Guide

Posted by Kurt Smith

New York City being the nub of world activity that it is, there are plenty of ways to get to Yankee Stadium, all with their advantages and disadvantages. If you’re a newbie, the MTA subway or Metro-North railroad is the easiest and best way to get to Yankee Stadium. Taking your car can be done, but driving a car in NYC is not for the faint of heart, and you won’t like parking prices.

So I’ll start with your public transit options, but I’ll cover everything else too. (Need more Yankee Stadium help? Learn how to choose a great seat, what to eat at the game, and some tips for newbies on this site!)

There’s a lot of valuable info here, so I’m breaking it down for you:

From Manhattan, Brooklyn + NYC Boroughs: MTA Subway
From Northern NYC Suburbs and Connecticut: Metro-North Rail
Connecting From Long Island: LIRR
Connecting From New Jersey: NJ Transit Rail + Bus
Arriving By Car + Parking
From Other NYC Boroughs, Part 2: MTA Bus
From Other Cities: Amtrak + Megabus
Using Taxicab, Uber + Rideshares (And Why You Shouldn’t)
Arriving By Bicycle
Ways To Save Money Getting To Yankee Stadium

Okay, ready? We’ll get started after this quick word from our sponsor:

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how to get to yankee stadium MTA subway metro-north

At Ballpark E-Guides, we agree.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Manhattan and NYC Boroughs, Part 1: MTA Subway.

The MTA (Metropolitan Transit Authority) B and D trains on the west side of Manhattan, and the 4 train on the east side, all stop right at the Yankees – East 161st Street Station, at the Hard Rock Cafe entrance. All three train lines extend through Manhattan and Brooklyn, and connect with the rest of the extensive NYC subway system. Coming from Manhattan, the Bronx is always an “Uptown” train.

You should not have to transfer more than once from anywhere in the city, and most transfers are within the subway station and free. Trains get very crowded on game days, adding more fans with each stop, so your chances of having a seat on the ride improve if you get on further south of Grand Central or Times Square.

B trains only operate on weekdays and stop at Yankee Stadium during rush hour. D trains will stop at Yankee Stadium on weekends, but do not stop at the Stadium during rush hour (I have read accounts that it does on game nights, but the MTA doesn’t publicize this).

Here’s a trick for you: going to the game from Manhattan, if you use the express D instead of the B, you can get off at Tremont Avenue and then take a B or a D back–either will stop at Yankee Stadium. You’ll probably have a seat on the ride, and it actually could be a little quicker. (This also works if the D zooms by the Stadium.)

 

lexington avenue line yankees game

“See that building over there? That’s it.”

The 4 (Lexington Avenue Line) is an express until the late evening when it stops everywhere, so if the game ends late plan for a long trip back, but the 4 always stops at Yankee Stadium. I prefer the 4 for another very good reason…it emerges from underground just before the Yankee Stadium station, so you get a sweet view of the ballpark. I’ll walk a few blocks to get to a 4 for that.

After the game, there WILL be a large crowd waiting for trains. You may have to wait a couple of trains to get on one, but there’s no need to wait for an express train. Also, definitely get your added value MetroCard in advance, and avoid the lines buying tickets after the game.

New York’s subway system is perfectly safe everywhere, so long as you use basic common sense. There are always plenty of riders, and if you get lost, which is not hard to do, you can always ask someone. Trains run 24/7/365.

 

 
Metro North Train Coming

Featuring fans actually sitting down on the way to the game!

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Northern Suburbs and Connecticut: The Metro-North Railroad.

To celebrate the opening of the new Stadium, MTA built a Metro-North railroad stop a short walk from the venue, with game day service on rail lines that extend into the northern suburbs and Connecticut. The Hudson, Harlem and New Haven lines all stop at Yankee Stadium – East 153rd Street Station on game days.

Most Metro-North stations have free or inexpensive parking, especially on weekends, but not all of them do. Some of them, like Tarrytown, will charge on game days. (Tip: You can book parking near a station with SpotHero!)

Metro-North runs game day service from directly to the Stadium on the Hudson Line, and there is a shuttle train that runs from both Grand Central Terminal and the Harlem 125th St. stations in Manhattan. It’s a quick 16 minute ride from midtown, and these are far less crowded trains than the MTA lines.

Much like the LIRR to Citi Field, Metro-North a MUCH more pleasant ride than the subway, and it’s well worth the few extra bucks. The Hudson Line is particularly popular for its Hudson River scenery on the way to the city.

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metro north railroad how to get to yankee stadium

Unfortunately you do still need tickets.

A peak time travel ticket is required between 4:00 and 8:00 PM, but traveling on the New Haven or Harlem lines you can buy an off-peak travel ticket while transferring to the shuttle. Tickets are cheaper when bought in advance.

Extra trains run after the game, so no need to worry about extra innings, but don’t dilly-dally too much. The last post-game train leaves 45 minutes after the last out.

The MTA website contains more detailed info, such as where connecting services are and which train is the last to leave. They call the game day trains “Yankee Clippers”.

So those are the main rail routes to get to Yankee Stadium; here’s a bit about some connecting services:

 

 
How to get to yankee stadium from long island lirr

Even the Mets will point you to how to get to Yankee Stadium!

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Long Island: Long Island Railroad.

From Long Island, most all lines of the LIRR eventually connect to Penn Station or Grand Central Station. From Grand Central you can use Metro-North or a 4 train.

From Penn it’s a short walk to 34th Street-Herald Square and a B or D train to Yankee Stadium. You can also use an A or C train from Penn and transfer to the B/D at 59th (from the A, you can switch at 145th for a quicker ride), or take the 2 to 149th St./Grand Concourse, and transfer there to a 4.

It’s usually better to use the Herald Square, since the 4 will be crowded by 149th, and 149th isn’t the prettiest of stations from what I’ve read.

As with the Metro-North Railroad, LIRR tickets are cheaper bought in advance than on board.

 

 
How to get to yankee stadium from new jersey

If there’s one thing New Jersey excels at, it’s helping you get out of New Jersey!

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From New Jersey: NJ Transit.

From New Jersey, riders can get to Yankee Stadium using the NJ Transit trains to Penn Station, where you can follow the Long Island Railroad directions just described. Coming back, the last train leaves Penn Station at about 1:00 AM.

NJ Transit also circulates several buses from suburbs and park-and-ride stations to the Port Authority Terminal, where an A or C train can be taken to the B/D at 59th Street. The North Bergen and other park-and-rides are packages with parking and the round trip ride included, and it’s considerably cheaper than actually driving into the city, especially for one or two people. There are several budget hotels nearby for out-of-town visitors.

Buses should run late enough to get you back, but check the schedules. I barely made the last bus one night coming from an extra-inning Mets game.

 

 
Ruppert Garage Yankee Stadium

The real PITA of driving to Yankee Stadium is that you have to park your own car.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, By Car + Parking:

The only interstate highway that borders Yankee Stadium is I-87, also called the Major Deegan Expressway. Most routes to the Stadium use the Deegan; traffic obviously gets worse on game days. Access to the Stadium can be at Exits 3-4 northbound and 5-7 southbound; unless you’re very early you’ll likely slow to a crawl no matter which exit you use.

The Yankees provide directions from all of the boroughs, Westchester, Long Island, New Jersey and Connecticut on their website. If you arrive early enough, traffic and parking isn’t too bad at all, but after the game it can be rough exiting.

There’s a lot you should know about driving to the Stadium, especially where to park…so if you’re trying this, check out my extensive Yankee Stadium parking guide, with alternate routes, pluses and minuses of various spots, and even some free street parking you can use.

But my #1 piece of advice, as always, is to book your parking lot beforehand, and my friends at SpotHero are a big help. (My #2 piece of advice…arrive as early as you can, preferably at least two hours before the first pitch.)

Never Drive To Yankee Stadium Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
how to get to yankee stadium by bus

Keep in mind that the bus driver won’t be using any shortcuts.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Manhattan + Other Boroughs, Part 2: MTA Bus.

NYC buses are considerably slower than trains and aren’t the most pleasant of rides. The only reason I can think of to ride the bus is if you want a view of the city. But I’m adding this just in case.

The MTA Bx6 and Bx13 routes drop riders off directly on the corner of 161st and River Avenue, right at the front door of Yankee Stadium. The Bx1 and Bx2 from stop at 161st and the Grand Concourse near the ballpark, as does the express BxM4 from Midtown.

The Bx6 runs all day and all night, but after 1:00 AM there is about an hour wait between buses. The Bx13 picks up fans after the game until about 1:00 AM, so you should be safe. Use a MetroCard or exact change to ride an MTA bus. You can find the routes for the buses on MTA’s website.

There are also express buses that run from other boroughs to Manhattan, where you can use a subway train to the game:

From Brooklyn, the X28, X29, BM2, and BM3 run to Grand Central Station where you grab a 4 or a Metro-North train.

From Queens, the QM1, QM1A, QM2, QM2A and QM4 buses run on 34th Street in Manhattan to several locations where you can get on a B, D, or 4 train.

Again, the routes and schedules are on MTA’s website. Bus to subway transfers are free.

 

 
amtrak to nyc baseball

Okay, let’s not get carried away here. No one’s paying $1,200 a ticket to ride on Amtrak.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Other Cities: Amtrak + Megabus.

If you’re using Amtrak to get to a Yankees game, there are a bunch of services that stop at Penn Station; from there you can get on the B or D to Yankee Stadium.

Amtrak isn’t the cheapest way to get to the game, but it’s not a bad option for, say, visiting Orioles fans who want to get back to Baltimore without staying overnight. That ride is under three hours most times, which isn’t bad at all, especially knowing you can avoid I-95 traffic and NYC congestion.

 

megabus NYC

Well, when they are in service, they’re pretty good. Just saying.

If you’re saving cash, Megabus is a low cost bus service that drop riders off in a couple of locations in midtown Manhattan. They run buses from several nearby major metropolises, including from Boston and Philadelphia. If you book the ride early enough (as in several months ahead of time) you can ride from Philadelphia or Boston to New York for $1, but even the regular fare is still a big savings over gas, tolls and parking.

Megabus drops you off in midtown Manhattan; from there it’s probably a two train subway ride depending on where you are…the destination address changes from time to time. As I write this it’s close to the 34th Street-Hudson Yards Station…from there you can take the 7 to Grand Central and then get on the 4. (By the way, it’s a single train ride to Citi Field from there.)

Megabus has saved me a ton of cash (I once went from NYC to Boston and back for $2.50 round trip) and they’re comfortable as buses go.

 

 
how to get to yankee stadium taxi uber lyft

Safely, sure. Quickly, I wouldn’t bet on it even with someone else driving.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium: Taxicab + Ride Sharing.

Taking a cab in New York City is expensive and an ill-advised method of getting to or from Yankee Stadium, but if you need one after the game, you can head to Gate 2 or Gate 4 where there is a car service dispatch. You’ll need it. I saw a few drivers in front of Babe Ruth Plaza, but they took off when I tried to take their picture, so they may not be allowed to hang out there.

If you’re arriving in a cab or Lyft or Uber vehicle, it’s a good idea to ask your driver to drop you off on Jerome Avenue on the opposite side of the Stadium from the B-D-4 madness. There is an Uber pickup area at Jerome and Anderson Avenues.

Word of warning about using a rideshare or taxi, and why I don’t recommend it. While you might be okay without spending an arm and a leg coming to the game, with everyone leaving afterwards there is a LOT of congestion. Getting a ride not only might take a while, but it will cost you mucho dinero leaving the game through the traffic. There’s much easier and cheaper ways to get to Yankee Stadium…as I’ve demonstrated here!

 
how to get to yankee stadium bicycle

No, this isn’t the guy you pay to watch your bike. At least I don’t think he is. But he isn’t likely to steal it either.

Unusual Ways To Get To Yankee Stadium: By Bicycle.

The New York City Department of Transportation has a bicycling map of New York City available, or you can get one in any local bicycle store. You shouldn’t have any problem locking up your bike, since the Yankees have enough bicycle racks for 160 bikes. Whether you trust leaving your bicycle here is up to you…most people say if you have a solid lock it will be fine. I have read accounts from people who offer a few bucks to bouncers at Stan’s Sports Bar to watch their bike.

The Bronx isn’t the best of neighborhoods, so if you do this for a night game, you should probably take the subway back afterwards; use the first or last car on the train and be prepared to wait for a few cars before one has the space.

I’ve seen some bicycle paths along the Grand Concourse and such, but closing in on game time crowds around the Stadium get pretty large, so you may end up hopping off as you get closer.

 

 
how to save money at yankee stadium getting there

At Ballpark E-Guides, we don’t do $50 parking.

Some Ways To Save Money Getting To Yankee Stadium

Thanks for sticking with me this far! Here’s a few Tightwad Tips to help you save money getting to the ballpark:

$ – All MTA services feature discounts for seniors, disabled, active duty military and children; three kids under 44 inches tall can ride free with an adult. If you’re in NYC for a few days, a 7-Day Pass will pay for itself in 12 rides (easily done).

$ – The LIRR and Metro-North offer a weekend deal called the CityTicket, for travel at a discounted rate within the city limits. Makes it only slightly more expensive to travel on a much nicer and quicker train coming from, say, Queens.

$ – If you can swing it, try to use the LIRR or Metro-North during off-peak hours (before 4:00 PM on weeknights), where the fare is significantly less.

$ – There are multiple discounts on the NJ Transit website for military members, senior citizens, children of a certain age, etc., so check it out and see if you qualify. Two kids with an adult can ride free on weekends.

Again, if you’re coming by car and looking to save money, consult my Ultimate Yankee Stadium Parking Guide…lots of useful tips there!

 

best way to get to yankee stadium

And now, you can race me to Yankee Stadium!

So there you go baseball fans…everything you need to know about how to get to Yankee Stadium. If you need more Yankee Stadium help, I’ve got you covered…check out this detailed guide for finding the best seats, the full details about Yankee Stadium food, and even some tips for bringing food into the ballpark. Helpful stuff before you get your Yankees tickets!

Or just check out my complete Yankee Stadium guide here, and if you’re on a baseball trip to NYC, be sure to read my very helpful guide for Citi Field too!

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5 Best Comerica Park Parking Tips | Detroit Tigers

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning a trip to District Detroit for a Tigers game, and need help picking out the best Comerica Park parking spot for your budget and taste, I’m here to help. There is ample parking in the area for baseball games, including official parking areas, off-site garages, and even street parking, but you should have a plan.

So then, as your unofficial Comerica Park parking guide, I’m offering five useful suggestions for parking at Detroit Tigers games. But first, a quick bit of advice from our sponsor…if you’d like to look further beyond my suggestions here, see below to order a parking pass with my friends at SpotHero!

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Comerica Park Parking Lots + Garages – 5 Suggestions:

comerica park parking detroit tigers garage

It’s not the D Garage as in a letter grade. It’s actually a good spot.

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #1) Tigers Garage (250 Fisher Road). The Tigers garages are located north of the ballpark, and are among the most expensive parking facilities. These lots fill up quickly on game days, with folks who are uncomfortable leaving their car in downtown Detroit or don’t want to walk much. There is a pedestrian bridge to the suite entrances here.

The team has built the five-story McLaren Garage (90 E. Fisher Service Drive) next the Tiger Garage, replacing Lot 3; it has 900 parking spaces on several levels, with indoor stairways and an elevator. There are also outdoor lots both on Montcalm and right in front of the main entrance with a few spaces; the Tigers charge the same for these lots.

The nice thing about the Tigers / Olympia Development lots is that if you need your car jump started after the game or you locked your keys in it, the attendant will either help you or contact AAA. No tailgating though.

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comerica park parking ford field

Even indoors, the Lions still play in any weather.

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #2) Ford Field. There is premium parking in Lots 4 and 5 on the I-75 side of Ford Field, with tailgating allowed even, which isn’t found in many local lots. These lots are the same high price as the Tigers Garage next door and offers an easy out back onto I-75.

But there is also the cheaper and lesser known Ford Field parking deck (1902 St. Antoine) located on the west side of the stadium—that for some reason the Tigers do not point out on their parking page. This isn’t a bad deal at all; it’s cheaper than prime lots that are just as close to the ballpark.

Another nice thing about it is that you can actually walk through the impressive football stadium on the inside to get to the ballpark, and there are even some food stands there. You can’t walk through the stadium to get back, but you’ll pass by some cool bucket drummers after the game.

 

comerica park parking fox theatre

Lions with Wings…get it?

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #3) Fox Theatre Garage (50 W. Montcalm Street). The garage next door to the Fox Theatre is a short walk to the main entrance. It is slightly less than the Tigers lots, but there are better deals just west of (behind) it—the Tigers run lots for half the price are only a couple of blocks away. The Fox garage can be slow to exit; you may want to have a bite at nearby Hockeytown Café first.

Years ago I parked in the Fox garage before 3:00 PM on a game night and paid just $2 for the whole day; in my last visit the early bird price was $5 and the nice lady said yes, you can leave your car there through the game. I love that trick: you can park early in the morning or afternoon, jump on the People Mover or the QLine along Woodward Avenue, and visit some Detroit attractions during the day (like Z’s Villa for pizza). And after the game your car is right there.

If there’s something happening at the Fox, they will occasionally hold the spots only for Fox customers, which I assume means you have to show your ticket to the event. Probably a good idea to check beforehand.

One more cool thing about the Fox…it’s close to the right field entrance of Comerica, which is the main gate and features all of the cool tigers statues.

 

detroit tigers game day parking gem theater garage

A hidden gem for Tigers game day parking. Just don’t stand there!

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #4) Gem Theater Garage (1910 Brush Street). The Gem garage is located off of Brush Street southeast of the ballpark, next to the Elwood Bar & Grill. It’s a hidden gem, pun intended. This is kind of tucked into the area, so if you’re using it, get here well before the first pitch.

The price for this lot varies, but it’s usually less than the Tigers lots or Fox lot and is a pretty good deal for its proximity to the park (Elwood brags that they are 56 steps away from Comerica, and the Gem is right next door). Great if you like a post-game party at Elwood’s, which a lot of Tigers fans do, and that’s a good idea since with its location it can take longer to exit.

 

comerica park parking greektown

You can’t miss the sign with it being all neon-y and all.

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #5) Greektown Casino Garage (1001 Brush Street). Greektown is accessible from the E. Lafayette St. exit off of I-375. The Greektown Casino used to offer free parking if you had your ticket validated; from there you could walk about three blocks to the ballpark or use the People Mover to and from Grand Circus Park station. If you exit on Brush Street, you can see the ballpark from the street.

The official policy for Tigers parking is that it’s free if you get your card validated and accumulate a certain number of points (which means losing some money in the casino), but if you get there early enough you might slide for free as I did twice in my last visit, especially on a weekday. At worst you’ll pay a small fee to park in an attended garage. If you’re concerned, you can book this on SpotHero ahead of time.

Greektown has some great restaurants and the casino itself, so it’s not short on entertainment before or after the game. There are also a couple of nearby taverns that will shuttle you to the game. I recommend having a plan for passing some time if there’s a big crowd at the game though, there have been numerous complaints about the wait getting out.

I have heard stories that Greektown isn’t the safest place at night, and it is a bit of a walk that might make you uncomfortable. But for day games, I think this may be the best deal.

There’s five suggestions for choosing a parking spot at your next Detroit Tigers game…but there are plenty more official parking lots, where you can reserve parking with SpotHero.

These are parking options I’ve used or seen in my past trips to Detroit, but again, my best advice is this: book your spot in advance, and have a backup plan. (You can also use another method of transit, or try one of the numerous Comerica Park shuttles!)

Interested in finding out more about visiting the beautiful home of the Detroit Tigers? Check out my Comerica Park page here! (And thanks for supporting Ballpark E-Guides sponsors!)

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5 American Family Field Tailgating Tips – Milwaukee Brewers

Posted by Kurt Smith

There is no pre-game party in baseball like the American Family Field tailgating. It’s not even close.

There’s a decent amount of grilling in the parking lot of Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, and things seem to be growing at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia a bit. But nowhere is the tailgating every bit a baseball institution as natural grass the way it is at a Brewers game.

So after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started!

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visiting american family field shuttle

Clearly this guy is a VIP.

If you’re headed to Milwaukee to see the Brewers, you should take part in it, because walking through the huge parking lots, the smell of coal and brats is going to make you ravenous.

So as a public service, I’m offering five important tips for tailgaters at American Family Field. If I miss an important one, by all means contact me and let me know, but these five should at least help you avoid a tailgating fail.

american family field tailgating bratwursts

I hope it’s enough…

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #1: Boil Your Brats Beforehand. The American Family Field lots open three hours before game time, which is a good amount of time for tailgating, but not a lot if you’re cooking raw meat on the grill that took you a few minutes to fire up.

So get your Usinger’s or Johnsonville brats beforehand, and boil them in beer and water the night before—a beer for every two brats, with maybe some onion and red pepper for extra taste. It takes a while—I’ve read an hour, but I’ve cooked sausages in 20 minutes, so decide for yourself.

Once you’ve boiled the brats to a gray color, all that will be needed is to brown them on the grill at the ballpark, which takes significantly less time in an environment where people will be finding bricks appetizing.

In fact, prepare everything you can the night before, like slicing cheese and putting food into containers or footballs in the car. Hey, I told you Brewers fans take this seriously. Being prepared for a Brewers tailgate takes some work.

 

secret stadium sauce polish

It’s like a zingy BBQ sauce. But different.

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #2: Bring Secret Stadium Sauce. OK, not everyone loves the most popular condiment in Milwaukee. It’s not even necessarily for you. You can bring sauerkraut, Kopp’s deli mustard, even ketchup, but a nearby tailgater might have forgotten the Secret Stadium Sauce, or you may come across a first-time visitor to American Family Field who wants to know what the fuss is about with the Sauce.

Secret Stadium Sauce is usually available in most supermarkets in the Milwaukee area; it’s also available in the Team Shop, which opens when the parking lots do in case of an emergency. You can also order it on Amazon.

Don’t know what the Secret Stadium Sauce is? Check it out here.

Don’t wait till you get to the ballpark to get your Milwaukee Brewers gear…
Order your caps, jerseys, and more now at MLBShop.com and save!

Click here to order your Brew Crew gear today!

 

American Family Field tailgating tailgate town sign

It’s all about cheaper beer.

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #3: Arrive EARLY. I’ve already said that Brewers fans take their tailgating seriously, and that the lots open three hours before game time. Add the two together and the sum is a long line of cars in line at most of the gates, especially for the cheaper lots. These are people itching to get their tent and grill set up and will arrive an hour before the lots open to be the first ones in.

Most people don’t pre-pay to get in to the lots, so attendants are making change for most of them. Bring a book to read if you must while you’re waiting, but try to get to American Family at least a half an hour before the lots open.

 

American Family Field tailgating leinies

Yes, it’s a Miller product…now.

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #4: Drink Miller Products, But Don’t Imbibe Too Much After The First Hour. Many Brewers fans insist on Miller products vs. the Budweiser Empire that has helped fund 11 World Series titles for the division rival Cardinals. I at least would recommend taking a step up to Leinenkugel’s, a Chippewa Falls brewery that is now distributed by Miller. Needless to say, have plenty of ice.

But whatever your preference, make sure that you get the majority of beer consumption out of the way early. The parking lots at American Family Field have an ample amount of port-a-potties to accommodate tailgaters’ needs, but once that parking lot is filled with beer drinkers an hour before the game, lines will form.

And waiting in line for relief after four beers can make a minute seem like an hour. We’ve all been there. Don’t be at Level Ten with three other people just as full in front of you.

 

American Family Field tailgating lot

And this is just the preferred lot!

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #5: Put A Window Flag On Your Car. This is a common tradition at Brewers games. Not only will it help you find your car (which, if you need help with, maybe you shouldn’t be driving), but you can also let people know that you’re a proud fan of the Timbler-Rattlers, Harley-Davidson, or Matt Kenseth. (I know that last one is obscure. Matt Kenseth is a NASCAR driver from Wisconsin. Yes, NASCAR’s still around.)

Needless to say, it should be unique…it’s okay to have a Brewers flag, of course, but that won’t necessarily make you stand out in the American Family Field parking lot.

Those are the five American Family Field tailgating tips that I consider most important, although obviously there’s other things to know…like that the Brewers will provide a taxicab ride home if you’ve had too much to drink, or that AAA of Wisconsin will give you a free tow if you can’t get your car started, or that you need to be careful leaving because people leave disposable grills everywhere.

Join the party in the parking lot; in Milwaukee, a ballgame is an all-day celebration.

Need more American Family Field tips? Check out this guide to Brewers game parking, some tips for newbies, and this complete list of Brewers game shuttles! And many more Brewers game tips here

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

 

Citizens Bank Park Parking Guide | Philadelphia Phillies

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning to see a Philadelphia Phillies home game, there’s actually a lot to know about how to get to Citizens Bank Park. This complete Citizens Bank Park parking guide will tell you everything you need to know, plan ahead and choose a parking spot that works best for you.

It’s a good idea to just drive and park at a Phillies game in most cases, since there’s ample parking. Public transit to the game isn’t terrible, but it’s not ideal. But don’t just choose the first available lot; I’ll help you have an easier time of it.

 

citizens bank park parking guide

Lots of Phillies parking, especially on non-game days!

You have a lot of options to choose from, so I’m breaking this down for you, including alternate routes you can use to find prime parking spots at a Phillies game.

Getting to Citizens Bank Park (+ Alternate Routes)
Official Philadelphia Phillies Parking
Satellite Phillies Parking Lots + Tailgating
Cheap Parking (With A Bit of A Walk)
Free Street Parking Spaces
The Chickie’s and Pete’s Taxi Crab
Parking For The Day in Philadelphia

Something for everyone! We’ll get started after this quick word from our sponsor:

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best route to phillies parking lots

“Found it! OK where do we park?”

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 1: Driving To Citizens Bank Park (+ Best Route)

The Citizens Bank Park parking lots are easily accessible from several exits of I-76 (aka the Schuylkill Expressway) going east-west and I-95 going north-south. From New Jersey, the ballpark is close to the Walt Whitman Bridge, which is part of I-76.

There are several interchanges to use that are marked “Stadium Complex”, so you can take the less obvious and less backed up exits before and after the marked ones (the park is visible from the elevated highways).

Traffic does get backed up, although the delays aren’t usually enough to make you miss anything if you arrive an hour before first pitch. You should check to see if there is another event going on in the sports complex, though, and arrive extra early if there is.

This is the best way to get there for me (I come from South Jersey): try using exit 348 from I-76 or exit 13-14 from I-95, onto Penrose Avenue. (This can be done going east as well.) Penrose is a good route to approach the park, since most people are coming from the roads at the frequently used exits and there’s plenty of parking from this direction. It’s easier getting out after the game for the same reason.

My only exception is when another event is going on. All of the city’s sports teams (and concerts etc.) use the South Philadelphia sports complex, so it can be a problem when more than one event is happening. Lincoln Financial Field (Eagles) and the Wells Fargo Center (Flyers/76ers) are south of the ballpark, so your best bet in this case is to approach the ballpark from Packer Avenue if you can, away from the other arenas.

I-76 traffic eastbound can be bad anytime, which you can avoid by taking I-476 south (called the “Blue Route” by locals) to I-95 north and using the I-95 exits. I-95 from the north also has its rough moments; Delaware Avenue runs parallel to it and becomes Pattison Avenue south of I-76 if you need to escape it.

If you find yourself with tickets for a Friday night game during the summer months, don’t even try to use I-76 eastbound. The traffic headed to the Jersey shore could well make you miss several innings. Try using a SEPTA Regional Rail train if you can and just make sure you can get back.

Coming from well north of the ballpark, I-295 in New Jersey is almost always better than I-95, and you can use the Walt Whitman Bridge and be right there. But as I write this, the I-295/I-76 interchange is in construction mode (as a Jersey native I can tell you it always seems that way); you might see some delays near game time especially.

 

 
Citizens bank park parking map philadelphia phillies

Am I the only one that thinks this map would be more useful before you park?

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 2: Official Philadelphia Phillies Parking

The Phillies have a helpful parking map on their Parking Information page for your viewing pleasure…but here’s a bit more to know.

Most of the lots owned by the Phillies are north of Pattison Avenue and mostly west of the ballpark along Citizens Bank Way; the preferred parking lots for season ticket holders are close to the ballpark but don’t offer any kind of easier out.

The lots for pay as you go folks are large, but there are lots south of Pattison and east of the ballpark that are actually closer. The cost of car parking is about the same in all the surrounding lots, so no need to search for deals at the last minute. You shouldn’t have a problem actually finding a spot for most games.

If you’re planning to enjoy all of the attractions in Ashburn Alley (and you should), try to get a spot near the left field entrance (Lots T, U, and V) and be early.

Tailgating is not permitted in the lots next to the ballpark; for pre-game partying you can use the lots south of Pattison Avenue. The tailgating scene is somewhat respectable as baseball tailgating goes. (Milwaukee it’s not, but it’s a good time.)

You can purchase a pre-paid parking pass on the Phillies website; but there’s a small service fee for it and most times you won’t need it. The Phillies have a useful page on their site that shows the easiest way to get to your seats; if you want to minimize your walking, you can plan ahead and use the best parking lot closest to the best gate.

The Phillies lots are also, for the most part, annoyingly last-in-first-out…if you need a quick exit consider some of the satellite lot choices below.

Free bonus tip for baseball history buffs! If you’re looking for the home plate location from Veterans Stadium (previous home of the Phillies), it’s in Lot U.

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phillies tailgating eagles lincoln financial field parking lot

Nothing like being able to tailgate in the rain. Philly sports teams truly care.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 3: Satellite Parking Lots

Lincoln Financial Field (Eagles) has sizable lots that are used for Phillies games; this is the most popular tailgating spot for a couple of reasons; there are ample port-a-potties to help you reset the clock before getting in line, and there are also large solar panels covering rows of parking spots that provide cover or shade from the weather.

The closest Lincoln and Jetro Warehouse lots are right across Pattison Avenue from the ballpark and are closer than some of the Phillies lots, although they don’t offer a quicker exit. (My lot of choice is usually Lot G, on the other side of Xfinity Live! It’s not cheaper, but it’s very convenient both to the ballpark and a westward exit on Pattison.)

If you are tailgating, it’s advised not to park your car in a dark remote corner because (I kid you not, someone online said this) someone may urinate on it.

The Xfinity Live! complex west of the Linc lot offers valet parking for about the same price as other parking; there’s no tailgating obviously but you can use a credit or debit card here if you’ve forgotten to bring cash. You’d probably want to tip the guy, so that’s an extra couple of bucks. This is very convenient to the ballpark, and good if you want to hang out here for the party afterward, but Xfinity Live! ain’t cheap. Bring your gold card.

Across the street from the FDR Club on Pattison Avenue (west of the NRG train station) is the NovaCare complex. Just west of the complex is a large parking lot with plenty of space for fans. It isn’t any cheaper and it’s a 20-minute walk, but this is a very easy and quick in and out.

Leaving this lot, make a right away from the ballpark instead of toward it onto Pattison, drive a few blocks and then turn left or right onto Penrose Avenue, which can get you to both I-95 and I-76 respectively. You’ll sail out of there in a hurry, and the walk helps you burn off your Federal Donuts.

The Live! Casino just north of the ballpark replaced a fairly unpopular Holiday Inn; unfortunately that also removed a favorite parking location of mine. They do offer free (or reimbursed) Phillies game day parking for Live! Rewards® members, but that probably costs more than it’s worth. Otherwise parking here is more expensive than Phillies lots; it’s a convenient location but you can do better for the price.

As I said earlier, Lincoln Financial Field’s lots are the best of the tailgating spots. East of Lincoln Financial is the Jetro warehouse (Lot M), which is also a popular tailgate destination. Jetro doesn’t offer the “car ports” that the Linc lot does though, and it isn’t any cheaper except from a good distance away, so if tailgating is your thing and you’re early, try the Linc lot first.

 

 
citizens bank park best tailgating parking spots

They don’t remove the bicycle racks until you promise you won’t tailgate.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 4: Cheaper (But Farther) Phillies Parking

The Phillies and the sports complex offer ample enough parking that there aren’t a lot of options farther away, but there are a few decent options to save a few bucks.

There is a church on 10th Avenue (Stella Maris Catholic Convent) north of the ballpark with parking that is cheaper than the Phillies lots, and it’s an easier out if you know where you’re going. Not too long of a walk and a nice view coming towards the ballpark. Incidentally, this spot is a short walk from Oregon Steaks if you’re interested in a classic Philly cheesesteak, but it’s in the opposite direction from the ballpark. Plenty of walking with that, but it burns off the calories.

The lots south of Lincoln Financial Field (as in the football stadium itself) aren’t any cheaper and are a long walk, but there is a lot behind the Jetro building that offers a lower rate. This one is a hike and dark at night games, however, and they claim to prohibit tailgating (although I saw some going on).

Similarly, east of the ballpark on Pattison you can find a lot or two that charges a few bucks less; it’s definitely a longer walk from here and some of them are gravel, but if you don’t mind this it’s also an easier out eastward after the game (partly because it’s cleared out by the time you get there).

 

 
free street parking at phillies games

Note the presence of a car owned by the Phillies…that’s a clue!

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 5: Free Street Parking For Phillies Games

My favorite spot for free street parking at Phillies games is on the western side of 7th Street north of Packer Avenue. I say this because I saw cars parked there and employees of the team coming from that direction, and they usually know how to park for free. I’ve done this without a problem, but you need to be early, and again it’s a walk.

Parking on South Lawrence Street in front of Samuels & Son for free was once common, but of late people have been getting ticketed for this. If you aren’t comfortable on South Lawrence, you can maybe try 3rd Street one block east, or some of the streets north and west of the ballpark, like Bigler Street (I believe the only time you can’t park on Bigler is when the street cleaners are out).

I’ve also seen people park on Hartranft Street west of the ballpark, which is almost as close as an official lot. I can’t speak to whether anyone’s ever been ticketed or towed, but they didn’t seem worried.

The Marconi Plaza park on the corner of Bigler and Broad has some angled parking spaces that I believe are free (I’ve never tried it). This is a good hike to the ballpark, but it’s not far from Chickie’s and Pete’s and their Taxi Crab shuttle (more on that in a minute). South of the plaza on Carlisle Street there is one hour parking on the east side until 6:00 PM, presumably after that you can park there and use the Taxi Crab.

There used to be free parking at the nearby FDR Park and Golf Club on Pattison west of the ballpark, but no longer. The Park charges a flat rate that applies all day on game day unless you’re a member of the club. I’ve read news stories of people being ticketed parking there for games.

All street parking is at your own risk of course; the Philly parking authority to my understanding isn’t very lenient whether there’s a clear sign on the street or not. The only spot I’m confident using is 7th Street.

 

 
chickie's and pete's taxi crab philadelphia phillies games

Someone at Chickie’s and Pete’s realized that “cab” is very close to “crab”. And that, my friends, is genius.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 6: Chickie’s and Pete’s Taxi Crab – Phillies Shuttle

If you want a meal and/or less expensive brew near Citizens Bank Park, the Taxi Crab from Chickie’s and Pete’s offers the best of both worlds.

At Chickie’s and Pete’s on Packer Avenue, you can order their famous crab fries and a beer to go with it, cheaper than in the ballpark and in a climate-controlled eatery. And they’ll give you a ride to the game in the colorful Taxi Crab, a free shuttle (tip the driver a couple bucks) with a cool paint job.

The shuttle is free but unfortunately you have to pay to park at Chickie’s and Pete’s. It costs a bit less than parking at the ballpark though, and your car is valet parked. And you can enjoy a meal at a popular local institution. It’s especially great for visitors who want that Philly experience.

FYI, Chickie’s and Pete’s has a stand in the ballpark for their famous crab fries, but the crab fries are much more expensive at the game (they even charge extra for the necessary cheese sauce). Instead, park at the restaurant itself, order crab fries to go, and get a ride to Citizens Bank Park’s front door.

Besides the iconic fries, Chickie’s and Pete’s has good grub at fairly reasonable prices. You won’t save too much money eating here over eating at the game, but there’s a decent selection of food and a long list of quality beers. It’s a big place, so you can probably land a seat.

So there are several benefits to the Taxi Crab: cheaper crab fries, less post-game traffic hassles, and a less expensive place for a drink before or after the game. It’s a great deal if you’re including a meal or a couple of drinks with your baseball.

 

 
citizens bank park downtown parking septa phillies

Once you get out to where all those tall buildings are, you’re not gonna want to walk it.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 7: Pre-Paid Parking in Center City Philadelphia

As I’ve said, you can buy pre-paid parking on the Phillies’ website, but you also have the option of parking in Center City (downtown for you non-Philadelphians) and using the SEPTA Broad Street Line to the ballpark. The Sports Express train is worth the extra effort if you can get on that one, trust me.

Some people do this move, but I only recommend this option if you’re making a day of it in Philly and including some sightseeing with your baseball (like the actual Liberty Bell); if you’re staying in a hotel downtown you’ll probably have a parking spot anyway, but if not, this is a viable option.

But if it does sound like a plan to book a space in the city and use the subway, definitely book it beforehand with my friends at SpotHero. They offer tons of great selections and you can choose the best deals near the train and favorite local attractions (if you’re a foodie who’s never been to Philly, definitely make the Reading Terminal Market one of your stops).

 

citizens bank park parking guide exit

And thank you for that useful parking map!

So to sum up all of this, the parking at Citizens Bank Park is ample and nearly always sufficient; you shouldn’t even need to buy in advance in most cases. The best strategy is to choose your spot beforehand, and plan your route accordingly, based on whether you want to save money, have a short walk, tailgate, eat beforehand or all of these things.

 

Need More Phillies Game Tips at Citizens Bank Park?

I’ve got plenty of other advice for your next Phillies game at Citizens Bank Park, including what to choose from the amazing food selection, how to land a great seat at a Phillies game, and much more…or you can simply read my complete guide to the Phillies’ ballpark here.

Thanks for reading, and please support our great sponsors!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Complete Nationals Park Guide | Washington Nationals

Posted by Kurt Smith

So you want to visit Nationals Park? You came to the right place my friend…this complete Nationals Park guide will tell you everything you need to know, especially about how to save money at Nationals games, on everything from tickets to transportation to food. These are my best Nationals Park tips, both for newbies and regulars at the Washington ballpark.

 

nationals park guide panorama

The home of the 2019 World Champions, in all its glory.

Nationals Park Guide Sections

I’ve broken this extensive Nationals Park guide down into parts, so you won’t want to break me into parts:

Finding Cheap Nationals Tickets
Choosing A Seat At Nationals Park
The Best And Other Ways To Get To Nationals Park
Nationals Park Food
Bringing The Kids
Nationals Park Accessibility
The President’s Race and Other Stuff

Gametime has your cheap Nationals tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets

(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

OK then, let’s get you started with some killer Nationals Park tips!

 
cheap nationals tickets

I’ll bet you would surprise the crap out of an operator by actually calling and asking about tickets.

Nationals Park Guide, Part 1 – Finding Cheap Nationals Tickets

Finding cheap Nationals tickets – or at least finding the best deal – is all about choosing the right avenue for buying them.

Say you’re looking for a high demand game…such as Opening Day, July 4th, or when the Yankees, Phillies, or Orioles are in town on a weekend. Your best bet is usually to pay face value for tickets, either through the Nationals website or their box office.

So do this right now: subscribe to the Nationals e-mail newsletter here.

The Nats will make you aware of ticket deals, pre-sales, fan club memberships, giveaway nights, etc. It’s a very easy way to score much better deals on Nationals tickets.

 

nationals park guide group tickets

Well worth the effort to park a bus in D.C.

Here’s just a few things the newsletter has informed me about: free tickets for military members; the very cool NatsPass; Value Days with discounts on everything for families; sweet deals for group tickets; you get it. It never hurts to check your newsletter.

If you’re confident the game won’t sell out, visit the box office on game day and save considerable cash avoiding online fees.

For low demand games – weeknight games, April games, etc. – you can often save on face price through a third party, like StubHub or TickPick.

One caveat though. Don’t buy from third parties before tickets go on sale to the public. The only seats available will be from people that have bought from pre-sales, and prices could be ridiculously inflated. Your best bet with third parties is to generally wait until game day a few hours before the game.

 

nationals park scalping tickets

Counterfeit merchandise? You mean the peanuts aren’t real?

As for scalpers, you can usually find quite a few of them, especially on Half Street leading to the ballpark from the Metro station. Treat scalpers with common sense, especially for high demand games…check the date and opponent and look for anything amateurish.

And if you’re considering trying Craigslist for tickets, check out my advice here about that.

 

five dollar nationals tickets

Never mind the view from the seat. Check out that price!

Here’s a great Tightwad Tip…as of this writing, the Nats still offer a limited amount of $5 tickets at the box office, on game day, for almost every game. The seating is in Sections 401-402, among the worst seats, but you should be able to move to a better upper level seat. Nationals Park also has some of the better standing room in baseball. (More about that in a minute.)

Five dollar tickets can’t be beat, especially in an expensive town like D.C.!

So remember, subscribe to the newsletter, check TickPick, and use the box office instead of the website if you can.

 

 
nationals park guide seating chart

The Nationals apparently forget about the demographic that just wants to know where Ben’s Chili dog is.

Nationals Park Guide, Part 2 – Choosing A Great Seat

There’s a wide variety of seating sections and prices at Nationals Park. I have provided helpful advice elsewhere on this site…check out this about the cheap seats, or this post about expensive seats, or this post about what to avoid and the great standing room.

But for here and now, I’ll just break it down into budget levels.

 

Nationals park guide premium seating

You wouldn’t pay more for seats this size on an airplane, but in a ballpark? Heck yes!

Really expensive seats at Nats Park include the Delta Club seats behind home plate, PNC Club seats behind them, and the recliners in the Dugout Club that you need to lose a lot of money in a casino to get.

All of these include access to really fancy clubs and great food, in-seat wait service, all of which is nice. In my opinion, though, they’re overpriced for any team, and if you’re looking to score a seat in these sections try looking elsewhere, even though technically the Nats don’t allow resales of premium seats. If you can score a deal, it’s worth it, especially with parking thrown in.

 

nationals park infield club

Unfortunately this nifty scoreboard is gone, but the Infield Club still has made-to-order nachos AND carpeting!

The mid-range priced seats at Nationals Park include Infield Club on the mezzanine level, and most of the field level seating, especially in the infield.

Given D.C. weather in the summer, I would choose having access to a climate-controlled club to field level seats if you’re comparing similar costs. It gets very hot in this place. Plus the Infield Club features great eats with shorter lines, such as brick oven Enzo’s pizza, sushi, a carvery etc., all with places to sit and enjoy.

 

screech

Field level tickets do offer proximity to NatPack girls. And Screech.

But seating on the field level does offer some fine views, and this is a place where you’ll want to stay low. If you can score tickets in, say, Sections 118 or 127, you can almost reach into a premium seat holder’s lap and grab a hunk of “complimentary” grub that they paid twice the price for. (Don’t actually do this. I’m just saying.)

Low budget seating includes outer mezzanine seats, upper deck (Gallery) seats, scoreboard porch seats, etc. There’s a large number of cheap seats here, but most of them aren’t great.

The outer mezzanine seats aren’t bad for the price and offer decent shade for afternoon games, but you need to make a trek up or down to find any concessions, so just be aware of that and grab your grub before you sit.

 

nationals park cheap seating

At least they make sportswriters sit further back.

In the upper deck, the 300 level seats cost significantly more than the 400 seats, but they’re worth it. The 400 level here is sky high, and it also involves much more climbing of steps. It’s not for the acrophobic.

That said, if you’re on a budget, I prefer 400 level seating in the infield to outfield seating…especially the Right Field Terrace and sections in front of the scoreboard, both of which are very far from the action. The lower level outfield seats under the right field overhang are probably the worst seats in the ballpark, except in the rain…you will have no view of the scoreboard or fly balls.

 

pavilion scoreboard nationals

And in mere seconds after finishing your beer, you can be back at your seat!

One cool thing about upper outfield seating, though, is that it’s close to the upper level outfield concourse that is among the best in baseball…there’s a couple of bars (with drink specials even), and eateries like the Shake Shack and a BBQ joint that shouldn’t be missed. If you’re a ballgame socializer, it’s not a bad spot.

Finally, there’s lots of quality standing room at Nationals Park, should your seat not meet your dreams. In the upper outfield level especially, there are counters to rest your elbows and your grub, mist spraying fans, even some stools if you’re early enough.

If you’re on a strict budget, try the aforementioned $5 ticket and stake out a spot.

 

 
nationals park metro

It’s what Nats fans do.

Nationals Park Guide, Part 3 – Fastest, Cheapest, and Some Unusual Ways to Get to Nationals Park

Driving to Nationals Park isn’t the worst as big city ballparks go, but it’s expensive, and chances are you’ll be sitting in traffic if you don’t arrive early. Most people recommend the Metro, but we’ll cover all the bases here. (Check out this post if you’re coming from Baltimore.)

The Navy Yard – Ballpark station on the Green Line of the Metro (officially the WMATA, but it’s called the Metro by everyone here) is just steps away from the ballpark. It’s also a neat approach, probably by design, with the inside of the ballpark in full view from Half Street and a plethora of cheap peanuts and non-alcoholic drinks vendors lining the path to the entrance. It’s baseball as it should be.

 

center field entrance nats park

Wait! You forgot your cheap peanuts!

You’ll need a “SmarTrip” card both to ride the trains and pay for parking at a station. Needless to say, have enough value on it for the trip back, rather than wait in line behind folks who can’t figure out the machine. (There’s always one, take it from me.) Parking at Metro stations is relatively inexpensive and free on weekends.

If you’re planning to drive to the game, let me start with this extremely key suggestion: book your parking beforehand. (Check out the coming widget for using my friends at SpotHero.)

OK, now then. The Nationals provide directions from every direction on their website, along with this nice interactive map to help you get to the game easily.

 

washington nationals parking

“Keep driving. I know there’s an R lot somewhere.”

Currently the Nats run seven official lots: the Geico (formerly the “B” lot before the B people pulled out) and C lots attached to the ballpark, which are ultra-convenient and ultra-expensive; Lots L and H a block away on Half Street which cost almost as much; and the more distant T, U, and W lots east of the ballpark. You can buy parking passes through the Nats, but you’ll pay a fee for that. Check your third parties; you might find a deal.

The W lot is the cheapest, most tailgate friendly, and one of the easiest to exit back onto the highway, but it’s a good hike away.

 

marc parc parking

“Yeah, pay Marc. He’s that guy in the phone booth with the funny mask on.”

There are a few independent lots too. The former HH lot some blocks north on South Capitol is still there last I checked, and it’s among the cheapest you’ll find. Long walk, though…longer than the W Lot even.

The best deal for something less than a half mile away is probably off of Tingey Street east of the ballpark. Just east of Lot W are more and cheaper lots, but again, they’re also a lengthy walk.

Want to try free street parking? Don’t. Or at least, I highly recommend against it. The city of Washington works hard to ensure you pay out the wazoo for meters during games.

Again, Nationals Park is a place where I would seriously recommend booking your parking beforehand.

This website, by the way, is all about what you didn’t think of – Here’s a few cool and unusual ways to get to a Nats game:

 

dc circulator

Less crowded than a subway car, cheaper, and a better view. But slower.

The D.C. Circulator bus is a cheaper way to travel around the city; great if you’re making a day around town. The Circulator’s Blue Route stops at the Navy Yard/Ballpark Station entrance. The Blue Route (but only the Blue Route) extends service on game days.

 

ugly mug washington dc

It doesn’t look like much, but they’ve cornered the market on Nationals Park shuttles!

The Ugly Mug is a tavern on 8th Street about a mile from the ballpark. They will run you to the game in a golf cart with a proof of purchase, and they have game day specials. Parking is not free or easy to come by, though, so this is best for folks wanting a meal and a drink before or after the game.

There is a specific location for Lyft and Uber riders, on the west curb of New Jersey Avenue between M and N Street. Ride sharing is expensive here, especially with surge pricing. If you can get someone to go in with you on the cost, though, it might work for you, and you won’t have to worry about service being available after the game…like you sometimes will with Metro.

You can even take a water taxi from Alexandria or nearby docks, courtesy of the Potomac Riverboat Company. The price for two is reasonable…about what it costs to park at the game. If you print out the ticket online, parking at the Chadwicks Restaurant is free.

 

capital bikeshare

A bicycle valet may be nice, but a rented bike allows for a quick escape without tipping!

Should you decide to bicycle to Nationals Park, the Nationals actually have a bicycle valet in Garage C. It starts two hours before gametime and closes one hour after the last pitch. The Riverwalk along both banks of the Anacostia makes for a swell bike ride, but I have read about some incidents, so keep your wits about you. I’m told it’s very cool lit up at night, if you’re comfortable cycling then.

Finally, you can borrow a bicycle from Capital Bikeshare; there are several stations near the ballpark, including right across the street.

Finally, I’ve gone into much more detail about the Metro and other ways to get to a Nats game in this post…well worth a read for important tips!
 

Never Drive To Nationals Park Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!


 
 

 
bud brew house washington

I’ll take the table by the window, and watch the grounds crew.

Nationals Park Guide, Part 4: Food + Drink

Since the Nationals Park food menu changes so frequently, I’m just going to cover my favorite mainstays here. Here’s the truly good stuff…if you want some more options, check out this Nationals Park food post:

The Budweiser Brewhouse is the restaurant behind the red seats in left center field. It has indoor and outdoor seating, and it’s best to go either just after the gates open or around the fifth inning if you want a seat.

The Brewhouse sells quality food like steak salad or jerk chicken at ballpark prices. The menu changes a lot, and there’s usually something unusual. It all can be washed down with Bud-owned microbrews like Goose Island and Shock Top. Upstairs is the Bud Light Loft, with a full bar, misting fans, and a bird’s eye view of the game from left center.

 

nationals park bens chili bowl

This chili dog will escalate your opinion of Nationals Park.

The Chili Half-Smoke from Ben’s Chili Bowl is a spicy sausage, with Ben’s special recipe chili piled on, along with cheese, chopped onions and yellow mustard. It’s a truly amazeballs chili dog, just grab some napkins and maybe a spoon for the abundant chili. Ben’s also has chili cheese fries, and they don’t skimp on the chili or cheese.

While we’re talking encased meat, Haute Dogs & Fries has some truly innovative offerings of gourmet beef dogs on New England rolls, including the Haute dog with brown onion relish, mayonnaise and celery salt, and a Banh Mi dog with jalapeno, carrots, cucumber slaw, cilantro and sriracha mayo. That’s just some examples…they might be different when you visit.

 

see you tater

And you thought Max Scherzer was a good acquisition.

I’ve loved me some smothered tater tots at See. You. Tater., named for Bob Carpenter’s signature home run call. Get a bowl of tots covered with Buffalo chicken and blue cheese, crab meat and crab queso, or whatever else they may be offering.

Steak Of The Union stands still manage to hang around Nats Park, selling the classic Philly cheesesteaks, and they keep it simple: just beef, onions, peppers and Cheez Whiz. Or get some cheesesteak nachos. I would get a fork for the spillage either way.

 

enzos pizza

This dude knows good pizza.

For pizza, Enzo’s serves up decent pizza in my opinion, at least by ballpark standards, with thin crust and ample pepperoni. It’s greasy stuff though…pat it with a napkin if you care about that.

The Scoreboard Pavilion in right field is home to some cool spots:

The Shake Shack is a Citi Field staple (there’s one in Philly now too) but it is equally popular here; lines get very long for the Shackburger, a fresh beef patty topped with lettuce, cheese, tomato and Shack Sauce on a potato roll. There’s also milkshakes excellent enough to have a separate line, and I can vouch for the quality of the fries too.

 

box frites nationals park

Even the sign looks appetizing.

But if you like fries, Box Frites (another Citi Field delicacy, SMH) is it…crispy boardwalk-style fries with several dipping sauces that change periodically. You might find smoky bacon or black pepper parm sauce or something like that. Try the garlic parmesan fries…you’ll thank me.

The Old Hickory BBQ Grill is fairly new, but Nationals Park’s BBQ has always rocked it. Old Hickory has smoked hot sausage with slaw and BBQ sauce, pulled pork and brisket sandwiches, and pulled pork nachos with house made chips.

You also have some healthy choices of course:

 

field of greens nationals park

Featuring Kevin Costner as Ray Kinshallot. (Admit it, you laughed a little bit at that.)

There’s a Field of Greens stand with mushroom burgers, salads, wraps, and hummus; it’s a good spot for vegan sorts. They also have a Gluten Free Grill in the center field plaza, featuring hot dogs with gluten-free rolls, burritos and pizza; Nats Park has a larger selection than most ballparks with GF stuff.

 

dolci gelati

Is it appropriate to have gelato at a ballgame?

Finally, if you want something different for dessert, try Leilani’s Shaved Ice or Dolci Gelati…Dolci has gelato in multiple cool flavors like “Stracciatella”.

I’m really just scratching the surface here; Nationals Park has a seriously long menu. But I still want to talk about beer and drinks very briefly.

You can find some excellent brews at District Drafts from local breweries like Atlas, DC Brau, Mad Fox and others. Atlas created a special brew sold only at the ballpark called 1500 South Cap Lager, named for the address of Nationals Park.

 

devils backbone

This is right there at the $5 section…so your craft brew could cost twice as much as your ticket. Baseball’s weird.

Or try the Devil’s Backbone offerings at their lodge in the upper left field corner. They’ve developed a brew exclusively for Nats Park called “Earned Run Ale”…a light IPA with a lemon and grapefruit taste to it.

For other mixed drinks, there’s some cool offerings at Distilleries of the DMV and District Coolers spots. Or at any of the bars around the concourse and in the clubs.

Thanks for sticking with me; here’s some Tightwad Tips for Nationals Park food…

 

half street vendors

Notice the people walking past the vendors? You’re about to be smarter.

$You can bring your own food into Nationals Park; they allow a 16*16*8 bag (no backpacks). Coming from the train station, there’s a bunch of vendors with hot dogs, peanuts, bottled water etc. I always fill up a goody bag with a big bag of peanuts and a few big waters for less than $10. Well worth it.

$ – If you’re ordering tickets through the Nationals website, you can add concession credit to your ticket, and they’ll give you a few extra bucks’ worth. Not big savings, but there’s no reason not to use it.

 

five dollar beer nationals game

Not even the Budweiser sign scared off these gentlemen from an ice cold $5 ballpark beer.

$ – In the upper outfield concourse behind the Big Board, the bar features a Happy Hour with discounted beers ($5 as of this writing) that ends 45 minutes before game time. Well worth getting to the ballpark early, even if it’s Budweiser products.

 

 
nationals park guide kids

The real Nats Park “Rookies” are the adult fans that paid more than $5 for beer!

Nationals Park Guide, Part 5: Bringing The Kids

I’ve dedicated a separate post to bringing the kids to a Nats game, but here’s a few things worth knowing.

The Family Fun Area has simulated pitching and batting cages, a nice kids’ playground area with a jungle gym, a picnic area, photo booths and penny press machines. The racing presidents greet fans here and pose for photos.

Kids can run the bases after Sunday games, and if you enter the kids in the Jr. Nats MVP Club, they’ll get front of the line privileges for this (and believe me, that’s worth the price). Kids club membership also includes team store discounts, a lanyard, and lots of other cool stuff. Definitely look into it for your offspring.

You can get your kid tagged at Guest Services just inside the center field gate, in case he decides to migrate. If it’s the kid’s first game, ask for a certificate.

 

nationals park with kids nursing lounge

Now featuring the seal of approval from Mrs. Ballpark E-Guides.

Recently the Nats added a nursing lounge on the first base side, a private area with comfy chairs, a play area for toddlers, and TVs for busy moms to watch the game. My wife tested it out some years ago (she was legitimate) and had nothing but nice things to say about it.

 

 
nationals park handicapped seats

Thankfully, they placed the disabled seats in front of the counter.

Nationals Park Guide, Part 6: Accessibility

There are handicapped seating areas all over the park, with folding chairs included. There are also plenty of elevators to get to the upper level, and you’ll need them. You can also borrow a wheelchair at the Guest Services locations.

The Ballpark Metro Station is fully accessible, with a brand new elevator. Should you require the elevators elsewhere on the Metro, check WMATA’s website before you go, since they do have occasional issues with them.

You can drop off people by car at most entrances, but after the game, they can only be picked up from South Capitol Street on the first-base side. There are no curbs between O and P Streets on South Capitol, but there is a walkway on South Capitol to ease crossing the street.

 

 
racing presidents

He may not win much, but Teddy is clearly the most jovial of the Racing Presidents.

Nationals Park Guide, Part 7: The President’s Race And Other Stuff

The President’s Race in the middle of the fourth inning (and the 13th, if the game goes that long) is always entertaining, although it was a little more fun when Teddy Roosevelt never won for various reasons. Teddy’s long losing streak finally ended in 2012, not coincidentally the first year the Nationals won the NL East.

Remember, once the visiting team is finished batting in the top of the fourth, get your camera/phone out to video the event.

Throughout the season the Nationals have theme nights, like “Pups In The Park”, “Stitch N’ Pitch”, LGBTQ “Nats Night OUT”, or Georgetown cupcake night among many others. Special nights are listed on the Nats website, and they’ll be in your newsletter.

Before Sunday games, two Nationals players will sign autographs for about 20 minutes, so get a voucher at Section 103 (free) and arrive early.

 

n-a-t-s nats nats nats woo

Just in case anyone forgets the words.

There is a cool cheer for when the Nats score: a group behind home plate in the upper level chants “N-A-T-S Nats Nats Nats Woo!”, and repeats it twice for two runs, three times for three runs, etc. The words are now displayed behind Section 313, but it’s grown to other parts of the ballpark and it’s unique to D.C.

Finally, I can’t think of a ballpark I’ve been to with nicer staff than at Nationals Park, and I expect it’s part of their training. Everyone is extremely courteous and friendly and willing to help with any sort of need; and they’re plentiful to boot. Kudos to the Nats for this.

Planning a trip to Washington D.C.? Save a bunch of money on hotels, flights and rental cars…book your trip with my friends at Hotwire! (It’s still Kurt’s favorite!)

washington d.c. hotwire

Click here to start booking your trip to Washington and Nationals Park today!

There you are my friend…your complete, detailed Nationals Park guide, for fans who do live baseball right. I hope this helps you save some money and enjoy a much better experience; thanks for reading and supporting my sponsors!

 

kurt smith nationals park

You’re welcome…see you at the yard!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, this website earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Ultimate Camden Yards Guide: Parking, Food + More

Posted by Kurt Smith

Here you are my baseball fan friends, your complete, detailed, and extremely helpful Oriole Park at Camden Yards guide! I’m here to help you save money on Orioles tickets, find the best seats at Oriole Park for your budget, learn how to get to Camden Yards and what to eat at the Baltimore Orioles ballpark.

Whether you’re taking a trip, bringing the kids, or are a visiting fan…heck, even if you’re a regular…this Camden Yards guide is full of useful tips for you.

Oriole Park at Camden Yards Guide – List of Tips

Finding Cheap Orioles Tickets
Choosing A Great Seat
Best Ways To Get To Camden Yards
What To Eat At Camden Yards
Camden Yards With Kids
Photo-Ops + Other Tips

 

Oriole Park at Camden Yards Guide

You’ve arrived.

So now after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started! (+ thanks for your support!)

Gametime has your cheap Orioles tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

 
Camden Yards guide cheap orioles tickets

Unfortunately the Orioles still have people checking to see if you have a ticket.

Camden Yards Guide, Part 1: Finding Cheap Orioles Tickets

So your first task is, of course, to find your cheap Orioles tickets.

The most common route to buying Orioles tickets is on the team website or through the MLB Ballpark app. This is perfectly fine, although you can often find better deals through a third party like Gametime. We’ll get to that.

If you’re planning a trip to Camden Yards, or even if you go regularly, sign up for the Orioles’ ticket alert newsletter. The Orioles will inform you about pre-sales and when tickets go on sale, and you’ll want to know about this. Face price when tickets go on sale is often the best price for games against the Yankees or Red Sox (and sometimes the Nationals, Mets and Phillies too).

 

Orioles newsletter ticket alerts

Just in case you didn’t know, the Orioles have a website.

The newsletter will also inform you about discount and giveaway nights, and the O’s offer some cool swag like Hawaiian shirts. It’s well worth the couple of minutes to sign up.

If the Orioles are contending, September games can be in high demand, but normally July and August weekends and Yankees and Red Sox games are the most expensive tickets. So if all you want is to visit Camden Yards, try for a weekday game in April or May if you can. You might score a great deal then.

 

Oriole park at Camden Yards Guide box office

Yes, believe it or not, they still sell paper tickets. Which make great souvenirs, incidentally.

There’s also the Orioles box office, which I usually prefer because a) there’s no “convenience” fees, which are significant, and b) I like having a ticket for a souvenir.

For most games you should be able to walk up to the box office on game day and pick up whatever seats suit your taste, and again, it’s cheaper without the fees. You might have to stand in line a bit, but the wait isn’t usually long.

Then there’s the third party market, and you should always shop around if you’re buying tickets online. Gametime is my favorite outlet (and an affiliate of mine); they usually have deals as good or better than others, especially when fees are added.

Speaking of fees, if you’re comparing prices between third parties (and the team website, for that matter), go all the way to the checkout screen to know what you’re actually paying.

 

orioles tickets scalpers

You sometimes might find a broker hiding behind this sign.

If you’re looking for scalpers or people with extras at Oriole Park, you might find stragglers north of the Eutaw Street entrance, in the retired numbers plaza (where the Babe Ruth statue is). The sign says it’s illegal to resell tickets on “Stadium Controlled Property”, which I suppose means you can simply walk across the street and sell your extras.

People with extras can also sometimes be found at Pickles Pub or Sliders near Gate F (left field) before the game. There’s always a crowd there and you can ask around.

For non-prime games like a weekday game against Oakland, this is a buyer’s market, and you can wait until just before game time and make an offer that suits you.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide red sox

The Orioles consider this a high demand game. Plan accordingly.

Finally, if you’re considering Craigslist for Orioles tickets, I’ve written about that here, but quickly, treat Craigslist sellers like scalpers…check the tickets carefully, especially the date and opponent, and if something doesn’t feel right don’t buy them. Sometimes you can find a great deal, but remember that there’s no protection from you being scammed. If the deal seems too good to be true…you know the rest.

So now you have some idea how to save money on Orioles tickets…there’s a different avenue for getting tickets that works best for demand. Just plan ahead and compare. With a little effort, you can score a great deal for a game at one of baseball’s best ballparks.

Incidentally, the Orioles offer some of the better prices on the high end seats in baseball; if you want to splurge on Club seats or Field Box behind home plate on your ballpark trip, Camden Yards is the place to do it.

 

 
Camden yards guide seating

It looks a whole lot more complicated than it is.

Camden Yards Guide, Part 2: Choosing The Best Seats

Camden Yards truly doesn’t have many poor seats, but there are a few you should probably avoid, and some sections are better than others. (If you really want the knowledge on landing a great seat here, check out this complete Oriole Park seating guide!)

Here’s a bit about what the best seats are for each budget level:

 

Orioles premium seating

For just an extra $100, sit in the shade behind these folks!

Money Is No Object Budget: Believe it or not, if you have the means you can get a suite at Camden Yards for a single game for you and your buddies; and it’s actually not a bad price. Food isn’t included, but you can have things catered for a fee.

If I were going to try this, I would do it in April or July when a climate controlled room behind your seat is a very welcome feature. There’s TVs and couches inside to watch the game on TV if you need a break from the weather.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide premium seating

This is why you put in the overtime.

Large Budget: The Field Level seats between the bases are cushioned and comfortable, and they’re reasonable by ballpark standards. All of these seats are good; whether you want something closer to Eutaw (first base side) or a straight ahead view of the warehouse (third base side) is your call; either is great.

 

Camden Club Orioles

“Relaxing here isn’t it? How about a crab cake sand…oh crap! I forgot there’s a game here!”

The club level seats are among the most expensive, but they include access to the spacious climate-controlled Camden Club, with excellent food choices, a full bar and a lot of cool Orioles memorabilia. If you’re interested in club access but don’t have endless cash, try to find a deal on the All You Can Eat seats in left field, which also includes access.

Club seats here are worth splurging for, but check and see if you can score a deal on a third party site first of course, especially for low demand games.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide obstructed view

Okay, it’s not technically an obstructed view, but by Ballpark E-Guides standards, it counts.

Medium Budget: Terrace Box and Lower Reserved are more affordable seating, but there are a couple things to be mindful of. Terrace Box can be a great deal for the money if your row is low enough, but in the higher rows the overhang blocks your view of the scoreboard and such, and part of the appeal of Camden Yards is the great views.

The lower level seating past the bases is noticeably cheaper than seating between the bases, but it’s still more expensive than the upper level, so if you like being behind home plate (as I do), you’ll probably prefer upper level seats.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide cheap seats

The Orioles usually draw better than this. Well, okay, maybe they don’t. But the view is still very good here.

Cheap Seats: The upper level at Camden Yards is as good as any deal in baseball; they’re not as high as in many ballparks, and they offer a sweet view of the warehouse, skyline and city for your baseball backdrop. Interestingly, only the upper box (lower rows between the bases) cost more than the bleachers, and they’re significantly better seats IMHO.

As you get past the bases, though, especially in left field, upper level seats get less appealing…outer sections are farthest away and don’t have angled seats…although in right field there’s great people watching on Eutaw Street if the game bores you.

 

Oriole park at camden yards guide bleachers

Proximity to Boog’s is never a bad thing.

The Eutaw Street Bleachers are among the cheapest seats in the ballpark, and usually feature loud fans of both teams on the field. They’re close to Boog’s BBQ and other Eutaw Street attractions, but there’s no view of the big scoreboard or the out-of-town scoreboard, which is a bummer. One plus is that they’re real seats, not benches like in many ballparks.

 

orioles game standing room

Prime home run territory, even since the departure of Esskay.

Standing Room: If you’re trying standing room at Camden Yards, behind the right field scoreboard is a popular location, but left field has some okay spots behind the bullpen too. You can watch pitchers warm up there and there’s a picnic area. The concourses aren’t open here, so unfortunately you can’t watch from behind home plate.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide roof deck

See the game the way the center field camera operator does!

If you’re a socializing sort, the Roof Deck above center field is a happening spot too. There’s a full bar (no view of the game there, however), and some seating with counters along the wall that is reserved these days. It’s a decent standing spot, but I don’t know if I’d pay the price for seats that far away.

 

best baltimore orioles seats for shade

It might be miserably hot and blinding, but it looks nice.

Finally, as far as shade, the sun sets on the third base side, so the bleachers and right field seats are the last to see shade on a summer day. Baltimore can get very hot in July and August especially; be prepared with water, shades, UV protection, all that noise.

That said, there aren’t many sights on the planet more beautiful than Oriole Park at sunset.

 

 
best way to get to Oriole park at Camden yards guide

Featuring a helpful photo of the ballpark!

Camden Yards Guide, Part 3: Best Way(s) to Get to Oriole Park

There’s a few ways to get to Camden Yards; which one is best for you depends on where you’re coming from, and whether you’re a tightwad like me. We’ll cover as much as we can here.

Despite its location in the heart of downtown, Camden Yards is actually surprisingly easy to get to by car. Well, most of the time. It’s right off of I-95 and not far from I-83, and there is sufficient parking in most cases.

 

how to get to baltimore orioles ballpark

You’ll see these when you get close.

Coming from I-95 it’s simple; exit onto I-395, which becomes Cal Ripken Way heading to the ballpark. It’s a little tricky getting to the Orioles lots and neighboring lots at the Ravens’ stadium (lots you should probably use from this direction); just after getting on I-395, get off at MLK Boulevard and use the ramp towards Lee Street; there’s plenty of parking there.

I-83 is best coming from north and west of the ballpark, but traffic can get very heavy heading downtown at rush hour, especially on Friday nights when the Inner Harbor becomes a destination. You might want to exit a few stops before the end of the highway; on Friday I might consider the Light Rail instead, which follows basically the same path.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide parking

You basically can’t miss at this point.

There’s plenty of parking lots and garages in the ballpark area, and the Orioles offer helpful links with directions to get to each one on their site. In addition to the Orioles-owned lots, there’s a bunch of garages north and east of the ballpark a short walk away, and in some of these you can find a really good deal, especially if you’d like to enjoy the Inner Harbor before a game. The Orioles’ lots don’t open until an hour before the ballpark gates do, so you’ll need to use a garage to enjoy other stuff in the area.

 

sheraton inner harbor parking

A great spot to visit Camden Yards and/or the Inner Harbor.

So now for my most important tip for Oriole Park at Camden Yards parking: book your space ahead of time. You can save yourself some money and a LOT of time, putting a pre-paid address in your maps app.

Seriously, definitely do this…I speak from some highly annoying experience of looking for an affordable parking garage in the agonizingly slow traffic of downtown Baltimore.

The Orioles offer pre-paid passes as well, and I would definitely go for lots B or C if you can (plan ahead), since for the price and proximity it’s a great deal. There’s also ample parking at the Ravens’ stadium that is affordable, especially south of the stadium, although this can be a bit of a hike from the ballpark.

The Inner Harbor area east of the warehouse is heavily traveled and parking is more expensive in that direction, and west and further north of the ballpark can be a less neighborly area, so avoid them if you can.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide eutaw street parking

I highly recommend you check this view out for yourself.

There are a few lots on Eutaw Street, most prominently the Marriott or Redwood Street lots. Walking south from a Eutaw Street lot offers arguably the best incoming view of a ballpark you’ve seen. You’ll also pass by some outside vendors with cheap grub coming from this direction…more about that in the food section.

You might find street parking where you could feed the meter cheaply until 6:00 PM, and there is a Horseshoe casino about a 15-minute walk away where I believe parking is free, but this being Baltimore, it’s not something I would do especially for a night game. Better to just book something ahead of time fairly close to the ballpark. Parking isn’t super expensive here.

 

m&t bank stadium parking orioles

Whoops…forgot they play football here too.

One last thing about driving to Camden Yards by car: if something is going on at M&T Bank Stadium or the Royal Farms Arena on game day, get to your pre-paid spot VERY early, or use the soon to be discussed Light Rail. I speak from hard experience on that too.

 

Light rail to Baltimore orioles

Don’t want to drive? Baltimore’s got your back.

OK, about this Light Rail. The MTA Light Rail Line has only one route that travels north and west along the I-83 path, but it’s got a lot going for it. The Light Rail is cheap to ride, parking is free at many of the stations, and it drops you off literally at the ballpark.

There’s even a couple of stations a short walking distance away, which you can use after the game for a better chance of having a seat on the train. Try getting on at the Convention Center if you’re heading south or the Hamburg Station if you’re going north.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide light rail

No, there’s no one hiding in the machine, although that would be pretty cool.

The Light Rail can get crowded on game days especially after the game, and locals refer to it as the “White Snail”, which should give you an idea how long it can take to trudge through red lights in Baltimore at street level. Still, most people consider Light Rail to Camden Yards worthwhile and once you get to wherever you parked, you won’t be dealing with traffic hassles…which can be significant here, especially north of the ballpark.

 

oriole park at camden yards marc train

No, I’m not washing D.C.

There is also a MARC train station right there at the ballpark; the MARC’s Camden Line starts there and goes all the way to Union Station in D.C. Unfortunately this is a commuter train and is only good for weekday games, but if you can use it it’s a great deal coming from D.C.

Baltimore also offers a free-of-charge Charm City Circulator bus that goes to popular destinations…including the Penn Station and Amtrak trains…but these buses get very crowded and you probably won’t be sitting. You can also use Light Rail to get to and from Penn Station, and it’s probably worth the few bucks by comparison.

 

camden yards bicycle racks

Get here early to grab a prime spot!

The Orioles have a bunch of bicycle parking; there are bike racks near the Babe Ruth statue off of Howard Street, and there are also corrals near the east side warehouse entrance of Dempsey’s. There isn’t a bicycle share program as I write this, though, and I don’t know if I’d ride through parts of town.

The O’s list Pratt Street between Eutaw and Greene Street north of the ballpark as their Uber pick up location…personally I don’t know if I would use a rideshare, since that spot is in the heart of Baltimore and again, traffic is very slow there. It would be expensive with the meter running.

 

how to get to oriole park at camden yards guide

Ah, there it is! Just need to look through the trees.

So to sum this up, if you’re coming from I-95, driving and parking is generally easy enough, but definitely book your parking beforehand, and check to see if other events are happening in nearby venues. The Light Rail is also a viable and inexpensive option, and I prefer it to driving in on I-83 and dealing with downtown traffic. Either way works fine; just plan ahead.

Never Drive To Camden Yards Without A Plan…

Book A Great Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
what to eat at camden yards food

Plus you get to meet Boog and all that.

Camden Yards Guide, Part 4: What To Eat at Camden Yards

Like most ballparks these days, Oriole Park at Camden Yards food offers several local favorites…which here means crabs just like Philly means cheesesteaks.

Since some things have changed since I first published this, I’ve dedicated a separate page to some of the best food choices at Camden Yards. You can read that here, but I’ll cover some other things you should know.

camden yards superbook

Named for the World Series MVP…oh wait…

Sadly, Dempsey’s is no longer a fixture on Eutaw Street. It’s been replaced by the Superbook restaurant.

Inside the atmosphere hasn’t changed much; it’s an air conditioned sit down meal spot that features a lounge with big TVs and odds boards for people who are into betting on baseball (insert Pete Rose joke here). The menu includes what Levy Restaurants calls “elevated gameday fare“, like tater tot nachos, crab dip pretzel rolls, burgers, sandwiches, and craft brews among other things.

Superbook’s prices are about what you’d expect at a ballpark restaurant; but it’s popular for the food and craft beers and TVs, and you should get here as early as you can if you want to try it. Lines get very long, especially on high attendance nights.

 

baltimore orioles hot dogs

Sometimes, a dog or two is all you need.

The Orioles offer an all you can eat deal with club access, that includes all the dogs, popcorn, peanuts and even salads that you can handle. The seats aren’t great, but it’s a great deal considering that you can duck out of the Baltimore heat.

Another cheap deal the Orioles offer is the $4.10 stand, so named for the Baltimore area code. This stand features inexpensive items like hot dogs and popcorn and peanuts. Good for saving money with the kids, and they won’t care about the size. You can always get more.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide soft pretzels

Good thing the Ampersands don’t play baseball in Baltimore.

Around the rest of the concourses you can find a few other decent food items…chicken tenders at the Charm City Chicken Shack, Buffalo tenders at the Hot Corner, and of course, O-shaped soft pretzels.

For healthier and vegan/vegetarian choices, there’s the Birdland Market on Eutaw Street, and a Birdland Fresh stand near home plate, with turkey burgers, Impossible burgers, vegan hot dogs and Beyond sausages. And Greek salads.

Again, for the best choices of food at Oriole Park, read this post. (It’s worth the time, trust me!)

 

bring your own food into camden yards

This is what baseball food should cost.

Finally (whew!) you can bring your own food into Camden Yards;unfortunately they’ve gotten more restrictive with their policy. You’re allowed a clear plastic bag no larger than 12″ x 6″ x 12″, so you can’t squeeze as much grub as you could in the past.

That said, this is a great ballpark to fill up a goody bag beforehand; there are vendors surrounding the ballpark selling hot dogs, sausages, peanuts, even crab cake sandwiches if you search. That kind of stuff makes baseball great.

My favorite spot for cheap eats is across the street from the left field entrance, where you can find Pickles Pub and Sliders; they set up grills and offer everything from dogs to peanuts much cheaper than in the ballpark. You can also have a couple of inexpensive Natty Bohs there before the game…all part of the Baltimore baseball experience.

 

 
oriole park at camden Yards guide with kids play area

And O’s employees even come out on cold days.

Camden Yards Guide, Part 5: Bringing the Kids to Oriole Park

If you’re visiting Camden Yards with kids, you have some advantages – cheap tickets, for one, with the O’s struggling at the gate even in winning times. And plenty of inexpensive parking and outside food vendors.

Here are three things parents should know when bringing the kids to Oriole Park…

 

Oriole park at camden yards guide kids cheer free

I only wish it was free from ’72 through ’79 when I was a kid.

Camden Yards With Kids, Tip #1) Bring The Kids For Free! Yes, you read that right…for each upper level ticket you buy as an adult, you can order two more tickets for kids nine and under absolutely free of charge. This includes every game except Opening Day…including “Kids Opening Day”, which is sometime in April.

 

Baltimore orioles kids run the bases Sundays

Not while the game is going, of course.

Camden Yards With Kids, Tip #2) Go on Sunday. On Sundays the Orioles offer cool activities for the kids, like face painting and autographs. And kids love to run the bases after the game…but get in line early if you can, because it’s a very popular promotion. There are a LOT of kids in the play area on Sundays, but it helps them burn up energy.

And if the kids are into play areas at the ballpark…and they always are…

 

oriole park at camden yards guide kids play area

Because noting gets a little one into Orioles baseball like a birdhouse play gym.

Camden Yards With Kids, Tip #3) Sit In The Right Field Corner. The kids play area at Camden Yards with the moon bounce, pitching and batting cages…and now a “Bird House”, a treehouse-shaped gym…keeps them occupied for a while. It’s at the south end of Eutaw Street, near Gate H. The Bird House is in the shade, while the moon bounce and other activities are in the sun, so you can imagine which is more popular.

They have food stands with smaller portions and prices for the kid in the Kids’ Corner, but you can find the kids’ portions anywhere in the ballpark now.

 

baltimore orioles kids

Watch the kids race up the steps…and then back down the ladder!

One more thing…don’t forget the little one’s “first game” certificate, which you can pick up at Guest Services on Eutaw Street. The Orioles can also tag your kid here for you so that the little one doesn’t get lost.

Family restrooms all have diaper changing tables. You can check in strollers at the Guest Services locations, and the Orioles will let nursing moms use a private room on the Club level.

 

 
oriole park at camden yards guide photo ops

The one ballpark that was built exactly right.

Camden Yards Guide, Part 6: Photo-Ops and Other Tips

As you probably know, Camden Yards started it all…the modern sports venue boom that is arguably out of control these days. Here are a few of my favorite photo-ops at the classic and beautiful downtown Baltimore ballpark:

 

camden yards images eutaw street

The Warehouse, the Bromo Seltzer tower, Eutaw Street, capture it all in one shot.

Camden Yards Photo-Op #1) Eutaw Street From Above. If you go to the upper level and stand at the end in the right field corner, you can capture the amazing shot you see here, and see happy baseball fans walking in wonderment along Eutaw Street next to the warehouse.

 

brooks robinson statue

The Gold Glove is so obvious, but I still love it.

Camden Yards Photo-Op #2) Player Statues. It’s difficult to imagine it even for thirty-somethings these days, but the Orioles were indeed once a very good team. There’s Eddie Murray, Jim Palmer, Frank Robinson, Earl Weaver and of course, Cal Ripken Jr.

You have to go outside the ballpark to see Brooks Robinson and his Gold Glove along West Paca Street, but it’s worth it.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide bromo seltzer tower

Imagine a time when antacids were a popular enough commodity that they could put their name on a city building.

Camden Yards Photo-Op #3) The Bromo-Seltzer Tower. The view of the vintage Baltimore tower is blocked by the large Hilton these days from much of the seating, which a lot of fans complain about, but you can still capture it from the right spot.

 

camden yards retired number statues

The most durable player in baseball history.

Camden Yards Photo-Op #4) Retired Number Statues. There are large numbers in the plaza at the north Eutaw Street entrance, and if you’re an older O’s fan you can tell people whose numbers they were. Incidentally, there’s a statue of native Baltimorean Babe Ruth here as well.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide photo op warehouse

All is good and right with the world.

Camden Yards Photo-Op #5) The Warehouse at Sunset. Few things I have witnessed are more striking that seeing the sun shine on the huge warehouse in the early evening. Don’t miss that.

That’s just a few, but you’ll probably break your camera out a lot here.

 

Finally, just a few more Camden Yards tips…but they’re pretty important ones.

Baltimore weather reaches all the extremes, and it can be brutally hot in July and August here. If you’re sitting in the upper level on a hot day, you might find yourself moving to an upper row just to be in the shade of the roof. Shoot for the third base side for a hot night game, where the shade comes in earlier.

 

oriole park at camden yards tips

They have the same stuff one gate over!

Giveaway nights are popular at Oriole Park, and people arrive early for their swag. If you want the free stuff, enter the ballpark at Gate G, a short walk from Gate A on Eutaw Street (the Light Rail gate)…it will be far less crowded.

If you take a walk on Eutaw Street (and you should), look down: you’ll see small baseball-shaped plaques in the cement where home run balls have landed.

 

baltimore inner harbor camden yards

The other reason to visit Baltimore.

The Inner Harbor two blocks west, with its museums, views, restaurants and shopping, is worth a visit. Don’t venture too far from the Inner Harbor or ballpark area though. There are less than ideal parts of downtown just a few blocks north and west, like the strip club littered East Baltimore Street, and it’s not a place you’ll want to be at night.

Baltimore fans are more polite than most to opposing fans, although this may be a by-product of being frequently outnumbered by them. For the most part, Orioles games are a pleasant environment for visiting fans. But if you’re coming from Boston or New York, don’t call the ballpark “Yankee Stadium South” or “Fenway South”, lest you bring bad karma on your team.

 

oriole park at camden yards guide mlb ballpark guides

You’re most welcome!

Get all that? Seriously, I hope this Camden Yards guide has been helpful to you, and that you can use the tips to save money and have a blast at your next Orioles game. Feel free to contact me with any questions, and if you’re adding a Nationals game to your baseball trip, I’ve written a helpful guide for that place too.

Thanks for reading this complete Oriole Park at Camden Yards guide, and for supporting our sponsors!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Want to know more about Camden Yards? Check out the links below!

Progressive Field Guide | Cleveland Guardians Game Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

Here it is baseball fans, your complete and extremely helpful Progressive Field guide! Your favorite ballpark expert is here to help you save money on Guardians tickets, choose the best seats for your taste and budget, learn the best ways to get to Progressive Field (including great parking options), and choose from the truly amazing menu of Guardians game food. It’s all here, and you’ll be a much smarter fan armed with these tips.

There’s a lot to review here, so I’ve broken it down for you:

Finding Cheap Guardians Tickets
Choosing A Great Seat
Best Ways To Get To Progressive Field
What To Eat At Progressive Field
Progressive Field With Kids
Photo-Ops + Other Tips

 

progressive field guide

I’ll help you get around the place. The food’s really good.

Okay, we’re mostly done with the key phrases to make Google happy (well, almost done: Progressive Field Tips!) so after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started.

Gametime has your cheap Guardians tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

 
cleveland guardians tickets

You didn’t get tickets yet? OK, we need to back up a bit.

Progressive Field Guide, Part 1) Scoring Cheap Guardians Tickets

Your first task going to a Guardians game is to order tickets of course, so I’ll talk about each method and its advantages. Pay attention here…this can save you a lot of money.

The first and most expeditious route is to use the Guardians’ website or the MLB Ballpark app to buy tickets from the team; the first thing you should do is sign up for the Guardians’ ticket alert newsletter. The newsletter will alert you to pre-sales, giveaway nights, discounts, and other worthwhile deals. Sometimes they do cool stuff like waiving ticket fees.

 

progressive field guide guardians tickets

Just in case you happened to have brought a few bucks.

The Guardians use “dynamic pricing”, meaning ticket prices go up and down according to demand, but they claim that tickets are cheapest when they first go on sale. If you’re looking to go to a high demand game such as Opening Day or a weekend game against the Yankees or Cubs, it’s best to get tickets as soon as they go on sale, since there will likely be a markup on these later.

If all you want is to visit the ballpark, the lowest demand games are easily in April (you’ll see why), but if you’re coming in the summer, try to get a weekday game if you can. Choice of opponent doesn’t matter too much, but the Cubs draw pretty big crowds so plan ahead for that.

 

cleveland guardians ticket office

Four windows open? Must be April.

If you don’t want to pay the online fees, which are considerable, you can get tickets at the box office at the ballpark; you can also pick up tickets at the team store if you want to avoid lines. There are ticket kiosks at the ballpark, but they do charge convenience fees for using them.

On non-game days the box office is only open from 10:00-2:00 on weekdays, and it’s closed on weekends, so you need to time it to save on the fees. They also charge a small day-of-game fee too, but it’s not as much as the convenience fee.

 

progressive field guide cheap guardians tickets

In case you didn’t bring your smartphone.

Then there’s the third party route, which can save you significant cash if you plan it right. The lower the demand for the game, the cheaper tickets will be, especially since the Guardians offer a lot of multi-game deals that leave people with extras. Closer to game time on a mid-week April game, you could find a steal on good seats.

I love Gametime for Guardians tickets, but if you’re comparing, just be sure to go all the way to the checkout page to see what your tickets really cost. Those fees are a b***. Generally, Gametime seems to offer better deals than most, just saying.

Remember that for high demand games, it’s usually cheaper to buy from the team when tickets go on sale; but if you haven’t planned ahead, try waiting till the last minute when prices can drop. Just don’t wait too long; typically sites shut down sales around two hours before the game.

 

guardians tickets scalpers

If they don’t know the name of the team, that’s probably a red flag.

The Guardians prohibit re-sale of tickets at any price, but of course you will see scalpers and people with extras on occasion, especially on the E. 9th Street and Ontario Street sides of the ballpark where most people enter.

I’m not sure if it’s just that I’ve gone on low attendance nights, but I don’t recall being pursued by brokers too much in my visits to Cleveland. Maybe it’s my “I’ve already got tickets” look.

Finally, I’ve written more about buying tickets on Craigslist here…but the short version is that while you might score a great deal on tickets, there’s no checks in place, so treat a Craigslist seller like you would a scalper. Check the date and opponent on the ticket and look for smudge marks or uneven scissor cuts. If your gut tells you not to buy the tickets, don’t.

 

 
progressive field guide good seats

There are many thousands. You should be able to find a good one.

Progressive Field Guide, Part 2: The Best Seats You Can Afford

OK, so you’ve found a route to get Guardians tickets; so choose your seats carefully.

I’ll talk about seats for every budget level here and what you should know. I’m skipping the suites, including the Dugout Suites, since they’re mostly for corporate types, but here’s the skinny for the rest of us. (If you really want to get in depth, check out this much more detailed post…)

 

guardians premium seatnig

If you pay enough for your seat, you won’t have to sit in it.

Money Is No Object Budget. The Guardians’ premium-priced seating includes the Diamond Box seats and the Field Box Front seats behind home plate; the Field Box Front seats are slightly more expensive than the Field Box seats behind them.

Field and Diamond Box season ticket holders have access to the swanky Lexus Home Plate Club; an indoor club with a full bar, some of the great new food items (more about that in a bit), and a glass enclosure to view the game.

 

progressive field guide club seats

Don’t let the empty seats fool you, they’re good seats too.

That big mezzanine section that juts out on the first base side is the Club section, with padded seats, drink rails, and access to the Discount Drug Mart Club, which is climate-controlled…no small thing here. Club seats include food from multiple stations, including build your own burgers, a meat carving station, nachos, pizza, etc.

Food and non-alcoholic drinks are all included with your ticket, and the seats offer a terrific view of the field and the Big Board. These seats come in three price ranges, and you can definitely save a few bucks with the “outfield” club seats without sacrificing much in view.

 

guardians game good seats

Just sit somewhere on this side. Not under that overhang.

Large Budget. If you care at least a little bit about what you’re spending, you can sit in the back rows of sections between the dugouts, or in closer seats past the bases and out to the foul pole. They’re still very good seats, but don’t include Club access.

If you’re sitting in the lower level, I prefer the first base side for its straight ahead view of the left field scoreboard, one of the most striking features of this ballpark, and the Cleveland skyline beyond it. However, you need to get a low row…with the Club section creating a big overhang, anything from Row AA up could lose the view.

 

progressive field guide bullpen seats

You can even sit in front of the bullpens and let pitchers heckle you!

Medium Budget. The Guardians don’t start calling lower level seats “Lower Reserved” until you get into right field. These seats are about half the price of Field Box seating, and they do have some advantages despite being outfield seats…for one, they’re close to the Right Field District, and some amazing food offerings, and Section 103 is close to the bullpens; watching pitchers warm up and offering encouragement is always fun.

 

cheap seats at progressive field view box

Stay warm in the lower seats!

The upper level seats at the Prog are divided into three price levels, four if you count the “front row” increase…View + Upper Box (400), and Upper Reserved (500). With the open concourses and suite levels, the upper tier is pretty high up, which is likely why these seats are cheaper than most lower level seating. It can also be cooler up here, so bring a jacket for the cooler nights.

Despite the height, I’ve sat on the first base side in the upper level a number of times and have always enjoyed it…the view of the scoreboard and skyline are superb, even if you’re not very close to the action. Not bad at all for inexpensive seats.

 

progressive field guide family deck

There is a secret escalator to get to the mezzanine, in case you don’t want someone to find you.

Cheap Seats and Standing Room. If you’re going as cheap as possible or want to bring the family without breaking the Venmo account, there’s several ways to do it.

The Family Deck is a similar level of seating to the Club area, but it’s in right field and doesn’t offer Club access. It’s great for families though…tickets are cheap and there’s a great indoor-outdoor play area that I’ll talk about in a bit. If you choose this spot, use the escalator in the right field concourse, and bring sunglasses, sunscreen and a hat.

 

cheap cleveland guardians seats

“Too high? What does that mean, too high?”

The bleachers in front of the scoreboard are among the cheapest of Guardians tickets, but the team actually sells season tickets to this spot, so it’s popular among fans. The bleacher seats have backs, so they’re more comfortable than at Wrigley, but I would still bring a cushion to sit here. The closer rows cost more than the back rows, so shoot for Row L if you’re going cheap.

Unfortunately, John Adams, the team’s drummer, has passed away. RIP John.

 

progressive field guide standing room

Underway at the Corner of Carnegie and Ontario.

More so than most teams these days, the Guardians offer some really sweet standing room options, and they sell a District Ticket that includes a beer for a very nice price. Both outfield corners feature standing spots with counters, and there’s a good spot behind the bullpens too if you’re into heckling.

In the right field corner is the two-level Corner Bar, a nice spot to duck out of the cold even if drinks are pricey. Visit the very cool fire pit upstairs to warm up; it’s a pretty happening spot on cold nights. (I’ve even almost had conversations with women there!)

 

cleveland guardians seats shade

Cleveland’s got you covered if you like some haze with your baseball.

Finally and probably most importantly, the first base and right field sides are the last to see shade for night games, something to be mindful of on a hot day…or a cold one.

 

 
progressive field guide getting there

See Guardians baseball, with both right and left handed hitters!

Progressive Field Guide, Part 3: The Best Way(s) To Get To Progressive Field

It’s easy enough to take your car to the Prog for a game, and you can usually find a good spot for parking. (More about your best Guardians game parking options here.) But there’s public transit options and shuttles too, and we’ll talk about all of that.

But first, driving to the ballpark and parking. Progressive Field is easily accessed by I-90/I-71 from the southeast and I-77 from the southwest, but the ballpark exits lead to streets you probably want to avoid if you can, if you’re getting there an hour or less before game time.

 

how to get to a guardians game

Hopefully you’ve programmed your GPS for a parking spot…you can’t park here.

To avoid traffic, try using exits that approach the ballpark from the north or west, like the E. 14th Street exit from I-77 or the E. 22nd Street exit from I-90/I-71. The Shoreway (OH Route 2 from I-90 east of the ballpark and U.S. 6/20 west of the park) is sometimes an easier approach. It might be easier to exit going north and using I-90 to get to I-77 or I-71.

 

progressive field guide parking

Note the presence of an arena just inches away on the map.

Remember that the Cavaliers play here too. If there is a Cavs game or other event going on in the Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse that night (and you should check), either get to the ballpark very early or use the soon-to-be-discussed RTA.

I’ll talk about some popular parking spots here, but my #1 tip for Guardians game parking is to book it ahead of time.

Here are some parking tips, after a highly applicable word from our sponsor:

Never drive to Progressive Field without a plan…

Book your parking spot now with my friends at SpotHero!

guardians game parking gateway garage

The bridge to the ballpark is gone, but the parking lot is in the same spot. Much harder to move a garage.

The Gateway East Garage is the closest thing to an “official” garage; it’s right across the street and fairly reasonable by near the ballpark standards. Definitely reserve this one beforehand, though.

 

progressive field guide parking lots

$20 parking, but no parking anytime! Hmmm…

The East 9th Street lots east of the ballpark are right off of I-77 and allow for a pretty easy exit, but you’ll pay more for the privilege. You can usually find cheaper lots if you go north a couple blocks.

 

progressive field guide tower city parking

If you can handle the goofy ramps, it’s not a bad deal.

The Tower City Garage is a bit of a walk and not any cheaper, but the walk is mostly through an indoor covered walkway until you get to the Cavs arena. Not bad on cold nights, and an easier out after the game.

There are plenty of other choices for parking, just consider where you’ll be coming from, and book something ahead of time!

 

progressive field guide cheap parking

Might not be worth saving a few bucks.

Be warned that as you get north and west of the ballpark in the Prospect/Bolivar/E. 14th St. area, it’s a less safe part of downtown, and you’ll see signs like the one above. If cheap matters to you more than convenience, try going east of the ballpark on Carnegie Avenue.

If you’d like to beat the man and park for free at Progressive Field, there are some streets where meters are inactive on weekends, like Carnegie Avenue east of the ballpark. You’ll need good timing to land one though. Or you could try the numbered streets north of the ballpark; many spots are free after 6:00 PM and weekends; you can feed the meter cheaply if needed.

The city is tougher on street parking for high demand games, so I would avoid trying it then. Like I always say, street parking is at your own risk.

 

Guardians game parking all day

Worth getting up early for on game day.

 

Finally, here’s my favorite parking tip for Guardians games, if you can pull it off: if you’re making a day of visiting Cleveland (and there are plenty of reasons to), find a lot that offers an “early bird” special…there are a few around the Euclid-Prospect-Huron St. area.

Park your car for $5 for the day, visit the Science Center or Rock and Roll Hall, and easily get back to your car and to your cheap spot after the game. Just be sure they’ll let you stay through the game, some lots might kick cars out before gametime.

 

progressive field guide RTA to games

Stand here long enough and some sort of transit will take you back to your car.

RTA transit trains are also a perfectly easy way to get to a Guardians game, if you can reach a station easily enough. Parking is free at most stations, the train ride is cheap and comfortable by big city public transit standards, and the train drops you off at Tower City, a ten minute walk to the ballpark. Most of the walk is through a covered walkway.

 

walkway to guardians games

Clearly labeled to avoid confusion with an “ambleway”.

Some things to know about using the RTA: for one, you pay your fee downtown, getting on or off. Also, if demand isn’t great, which is often, the RTA will sometimes substitute buses for trains to get to the outskirts of the Blue or Green lines.

The RTA is especially useful for high demand midweek games, or when the Cavs are playing and traffic gets heavy. Enough fans ride the RTA that you can follow them back to the station after the game, but you shouldn’t have a problem finding a seat.

 

progressive field guide rta trolley

No time like the present!

The RTA has some other options you can use for getting to games, like their eco-friendly Healthline buses and the free downtown trolleys that run during the day on weekdays.

I can’t think of an advantage of using the Healthline unless you’d like to enjoy some nightlife on E. 4th Street after the game and need a bus that runs all night. Similarly, there are only a small handful of weekday games, but if you can park for free near a trolley station it’s a nice deal. Try it if you’re going to Opening Day.

 

Progressive field guide flat iron cafe

Without the logo, you’d almost feel like a secret agent.

You can also use a shuttle to get to the Guardians game. The Flat Iron Café is located on Center Street near U.S. 6/20; there is a very inexpensive lot nearby but you shouldn’t have a problem finding free street parking there, especially after 6:00 PM and on weekends.

At the Flatty, you can enjoy a less expensive Irish pub meal and couple of brews, get a free ride to the game and back, and enjoy an easy exit afterward. I don’t know if I’d say it’s a well-kept secret, but everyone I talked to in my visit to the place loves this option.

 

great lakes fatty wagon

I like the picture so I’m including it.

The Great Lakes Brewery used to run their Fatty Wagon to game and back from its location near the West Side Market, but as I write this it isn’t in service. This may change, so it doesn’t hurt to check if you like a quality burger and brew and a ride to the game.

 

bicycle to cleveland guardians

Cleveland’s got a lot of people on it when it comes to bicycling in the city.

Finally, you have some bicycle riding options, believe it or not. There is a “Bike Rack” facility a short walk from the ballpark where you can use the outside racks for free or pay a small fee to secure your bicycle inside. They have showers and everything.

That said, the Prog is in an area heavily trafficked by cars. The Bike Rack people describe it as being for “intermediate” or “experienced” cyclists. It’s pretty heavy traffic around here, and bicycling isn’t something I’d recommend doing with your kid if they’ve just shed the training wheels.

 

 
progressive field guide sausages

This picture is what I call an “attention getter”. Now let’s talk some Cleveland ballgame grub.

Progressive Field Guide, Part 4: What To Eat At A Guardians Game

Progressive Field has so many fantastic food options that I’ve dedicating a separate post just to the best of the Progressive Field menu. But if you don’t want to go through all of that, I’ll list some of my favorite choices here…including an important bit about Ballpark Mustard.

So first, sit down restaurants.

 

club lounge cleveland guardians

Fine dining and bar service with a view of the outside world. And nachos.

I’ve already discussed the Club Lounge in the seating section, and it’s a great deal if you have the means. The Club Lounge offers chef-prepared stuff, including from Asian, pasta, and carving stations, and they’ll sometimes offer regional stuff based on who’s in town. (I was there for a game against the Mariners where they had Space Needle Grilled Beef. Sounded good anyway.)

 

progressive field guide terrace club

At least no one screams “Down in front!”

There’s also the Terrace Club, on the mezzanine level in the left field corner. It’s a meal with a great view of a ballpark, although the view of the actual action isn’t great. You can order pre-game or during the game reservations, but with pre-game seating you’re only allowed there for 90 minutes.

Still, the Terrace Club is definitely a cool experience, and the Indians have high-end buffets available for an amount of money that you could spend on inferior food around the ballpark. Aside from the buffet there is a high end if somewhat pricey menu with food that by most accounts is very good.

Outside of the restaurants the team has created several “Districts” that showcase some of the iconic eats in Cleveland. I’ll briefly cover the selections here; lots more detail on my Progressive Field food page (coming soon!).

In the Right Field District:

 

melt sandwiches cleveland guardians

This sandwich barely stayed intact long enough for this photo.

Melt Bar & Grilled has a variety of grilled cheese sandwiches made with Texas Toast; try the chorizo and potato or the mushroom sandwich with grilled onions…that might be the best vegetarian meal I’ve had at a game.

 

progressive field guide nachos

This might have been the best thing I’ve eaten at a ballpark.

Barrio allows you to build your own tacos, or at least suggest to the person behind the counter what to do. Their tacos get high marks but I can tell you their nacho plate is truly awesome. Very salty chips though.

 

cleveland guardians great lakes brewery

I remember the dark days of only Budweiser available at ballgames. You kids have no clue how good you have it today!

The Great Lakes Brewery is known for their craft beers (as they should be), but they have some cool food offerings too, like brats covered with onions, peppers and Ballpark Mustard.

 

progressive field guide hot dogs

Enough said.

Cleveland Dogs & Shakes isn’t based on a local eatery, but if you like extra stuff piled on your hot dog, this is the spot; ten inch dogs covered with things like pierogies, bacon, banana peppers or other stuff. Get your dog on a pretzel bun here.

Just getting warmed up here…

In The Infield + Left Field Districts:

 

guardians brew kettle

Just this description has me planning a trip to Cleveland.

The Brew Kettle is mostly about their craft beers, but they also carry the Wisconsin Brat Burger: a spicy pork burger with Swiss cheese and their homemade kraut relish on a pretzel bun.

 

progressive field guide pizza

Not sure how people are walking by, although it could be the nachos.

If you’re into high end pizza, Dante’s Inferno is a creation of chef Dante Boccuzzi, and at the Prog you can get a hand crafted pizza with spaghetti and meatballs on it, or the spicy Inferno pizza with sausage, pepperoni, olives and hot peppers.

 

fat head's brewery cleveland guardians

Because great ballpark food goes best with craft beer.

At the appropriately named Fat Head’s Brewery, get your big appetite on with their “Headwiches”…sandwiches the size of your head (almost). Try the Fat Italian or the Southside Slopes – a kielbasa with pierogies, American cheese, grilled onions and horseradish sauce

 

progressive field guide froot loops dog

Get froot loops on your hot dog. Only in Cleveland.

Happy Dog might be my favorite of the fancy food eateries at the Prog…for no other reason than they’re the first outfit I could think of to put Froot Loops on a hot dog. True. They have lost of other unusual options for baseball’s classic food here, so check it out.

Not done yet! The Prog is a great place to get your Mexican food fix on, even if I wouldn’t argue that Barrio is more than good enough for the task:

 

cleveland guardians game nachos

Now that’s some nachos!

Momocho has nachos and quesadillas; with made to order chips and homemade guac and salsa. Top your chips with chicken, pulled pork or sausage. It’s a great plate of nachos, although I still slightly prefer Barrio’s.

 

progressive field guide burritos

They even made a bigger tray for the street corn. Ohio City Burrito don’t play!

Ohio City Burrito is your destination for baseball’s most underrated food, the burrito. They fill your burritos with beef, pulled pork or chicken and the standard fillings, roll them with outstanding accuracy, and serve them with homemade salsa.

 

cleveland guardians game hot dogs

You’d be amazed at how difficult it is to get a charred dog at a ballpark. But not in Cleveland.

As you can see, pardon my French, but the Prog offers a kick ass menu with your baseball, and that’s not including the generic stands that sell very large hot dogs. I’ll just mention a few other things here:

In my last visit there was a Charred Dogs stand; I think it’s behind home plate. If you want your hot dogs blackened on an open fire grill, check this spot out.

 

progressive field guide footlong dogs

At many ballparks, footlong dogs are just stretched. The Guardians, on the other hand, care about their fans.

Speaking of those hot dogs, they’re still made by Sugardale; and at the also aptly named Sausages & Dogs stands, you can get the really hefty half pounders. These are like the footlongs you find at a lot of ballparks, only thicker…and with peppers, onions, and Ballpark Mustard piled on, it can be a great value by ballpark standards.

 

bertmans mustard

I don’t know why I don’t just get one of these. I’d use it.

OK, so let me talk about the Bertman’s Mustard briefly. Joe Bertman’s spicy brown mustard served at Guardians games has been part of Cleveland since the 1920s; Bertman’s takes pride in not watering down their Dijon-style mustard and using the vinegar, and you can definitely taste the difference.

Some folks, myself included, have picked up “Stadium Mustard” in Cleveland area markets thinking it was the same thing, and it’s not…it’s a very similar version that I’ve read was created by a former associate of Bertman’s. They’re very similar, but Bertman’s is the real thing if you’re interested in ordering some…and it’s definitely the best mustard I’ve tried in a ballpark.

If you’ve ever witnessed an inane Twitter argument, you might like this…someone who refused to identify himself emailed me about this and angrily accused me of spreading “mustard propaganda”, and who knows, he might be right, even if I laughed MAO at the accusation.

 

bring your own food into progressive field

If you happen to be in the West Side Market, pick me up a bag. I’m good for it.

I’m just glossing over the impressive food selection at Progressive Field, but just one more note. You can bring your own food into the ballpark. The Guardians allow a 16*16*8 bag, and they don’t specifically prohibit food, although they do say you can bring in one sealed bottle of water.

You can add some eats to your bag at several shops in Tower City if you’re using the RTA, and there are peanut vendors across E. 9th Street from the ballpark, and Aladdin’s Bakery on Carnegie Avenue has gyros and halal sandwiches. You get the idea.

 

 
cleveland guardians first game certificate

I got my certificate!!

Progressive Field Guide, Part 5: Bringing The Kids

Few ballparks are as kid-friendly as Progressive Field these days. They’ve added the Kids Clubhouse on the mezzanine level, and this has become a two-story interactive play area with a big slide and everything, and parents can watch the game while kids play. As I’ve said, the Family Deck is a good spot for families, but definitely bring sunscreen.

 

progressive field guide kids

This pitcher’s pretty good. Nothing hit out of the infield yet.

Also on the mezzanine level, the Rookie Suite and Slugger’s Sandlot are playgrounds for kids of varying ages, including a “Little League Park” wiffle ball field (with a short porch for your young slugger), a climbing wall, video games and batting cages among other fun stuff. You need to sign a waiver for the kids. They’ve even included a nursing room in case Time Magazine’s cover girl shows up.

 

cleveland guardians mascot

Is it me or does this mascot not exactly strike fear in opponents?

Most of the play area is in the outfield near the secret escalator (it’s behind the right field seats), with interactive baseball games and a mock-up of Slider, the team mascot, sitting on a bench (sometimes the real Slider or hot dog mascots will make an appearance). This is a very popular place for families (it’s air-conditioned in spots), so be prepared.

The Guardians offer discounted tickets for kids with the purchase of an adult ticket, and the Guardians have a fan club for kids that includes some cool Guardians swag, discounts on gear, and exclusive experiences for a price that makes it worth it.

 

guardians run the bases days

The cool part is high-fiving a third base coach.

Sundays are Kids Days, with animals or other attractions in the plaza on Eagle Avenue; kids can actually interview players and are allowed to run the bases after the game. The run the bases promotion is very popular, so you may want to bring the kid to the first base side early. They also set up a Kids Play area with bounce houses and such on Kids Days.

 

progressive field guide hot dog race

Hey, I get excited about Sugardale too.

The Indians run Sugardale Hot Dog Races after the fifth inning of each game. The hot dogs are Guardians employees disguised as franks covered with various condiments. Ketchup wins a lot of races, but is known to cheat. When not racing, the Sugardale dogs will greet fans in the concourse areas.

At Guest Services you can put a tag on your kid with the seat location, and get them a first game certificate they’ll file away forever.

 

 
cleveland guardians scoreboard

I haven’t been there since they changed the team name, but I’m sure the scoreboard is just as impressive.

Progressive Field Guide, Part 6: Photo-Ops + Other Tips

OK, we’re almost done…thanks for sticking with me this far! Just a few things…starting with a few of my favorite photo-ops here:

 

bob feller statue

Hitters hated facing him almost as much as the Japanese did.

Progressive Field Photo-Op #1) Player Statues. You can find statues of Indians greats Bob Feller, Jim Thome, Larry Doby and Lou Boudreau outside the ballpark in their classic poses, including Feller’s high leg kick windup. Good meeting spot for fans too.

 

progressive field guide heritage park

Cleveland has some cool baseball history. Not just the movie “Major League”. Although that counts.

Progressive Field Photo-Op #2) Heritage Park. The Heritage Park area in the outfield commemorates Cleveland baseball greatness, including a statue of Frank Robinson and a dedication to Ray Chapman, an Indian who died from being hit by a pitched baseball. It’s worth a look for baseball history buffs; get there early to avoid the crowds.

 

progressive field photo ops skyline

Smart move to add a skyline view to a ballpark. Probably have the Orioles to thank for that.

Progressive Field Photo-Op #3) The Big Board + Skyline. I’ve said earlier that the view of the huge scoreboard and Cleveland skyline is worth sitting on the first base side of the field; its especially impressive from the upper level. I haven’t been there since the team’s name change, so this is the latest edition I have of the view.

 

progressive field guide photo Ops

Wide highways, as far as the eye can see…the vision of Ohio is indeed a grand one!

Progressive Field Photo-Op #4) The Upper Concourse View. Even if you’re not sitting in the upper level, take an escalator up and have a look at the surrounding area from the upper concourse. It’s pretty boffo, especially at sunset.

 

progressive field guide mascots

Chicks dig the blog!

Progressive Field Photo-Op #5) Hot Dog Race Mascots. Before the game you can usually find the hot dog mascots that will be running in the race, and they’re happy to pose with fans as shown with this lanky goofball.

Progressive Field is a beautiful ballpark…there’s a lot of great spots to point your camera.

 

progressive field guide escalator

The obviously not so secret escalator, but secret enough.

Getting around the ballpark, it’s a long way to the top (if you wanna rock ‘n’ roll) of the Prog, so there are several escalators to use; the impressive main escalator is near the team shop on the first base side; the other is the previously alluded to “secret” way to get to the mezzanine in right field. Escalators go up only, but you can use an elevator at Section 559 to get down.

Gate A is the most popular entrance, being near the box office, play areas, and home run porch. If you want to avoid long lines at the gate, you’re better off with Gate D near Broadway Avenue. Or use the redesigned Right Field Gate, with the impressive statue of Bob Feller. This gate is the first to open; for the first hour or so fans are confined to the outfield, but with the food selection there that’s all good.

 

Progressive field guide guardians game

Don’t mention it. The menu was worth it.

Whew! No idea there was so much to know, right? Anyway, I hope you’ve enjoyed this Progressive Field guide and that the tips I’ve shared here help you save money, time, and aggravation, and enjoy the wonderful experience that is baseball in Cleveland. If you’ve got any questions, by all means drop a line…and there’s more stuff below if you’d like more details, by the way.

Thanks for reading, and please support Ballpark E-Guides sponsors!

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Citizens Bank Park Guide – Best Philadelphia Phillies Game Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

Planning a Phillies game? Visiting Philadelphia for some baseball? This highly detailed and useful Citizens Bank Park guide will help you land cheap Phillies tickets, choose the best seat for your budget, find a good parking spot, and choose what to eat from the impressive Phillies game menu. It’s all here…everything you need to know.

I live about 20 minutes away from the Phillies ballpark; I’ve been there many times and know all the tricks. Stick with me; I’ll help you save money at Citizens Bank Park and get the most bang for your buck at your next Phillies game.

 

citizens bank park guide

Welcome to the first capital of the United States.

I’ve got a lot of great and helpful tips for you, so let’s break this down:

Finding The Best Deals on Phillies Tickets
Choosing A Great Seat
The Best Way(s) To Get To A Phillies Game
What To Eat At Citizens Bank Park
Bringing The Kids To A Phillies Game
Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops + Other Tips

So after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started!

Gametime has your cheap Phillies tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

 

 
phillies game tickets

It’s almost like they don’t want you to know there’s a box office.

Citizens Bank Park Guide, Part 1: How to Score Cheap Phillies Tickets

You have a number of ways to get Phillies tickets…and finding the best deal on tickets is a function of choosing the right avenue and contest. If all you want is to visit the ballpark, low demand games are in April and May, and September if the Phillies aren’t contending. Friday and Saturday nights are the toughest tickets; midweek games are much easier.

If you really want to see the Mets, Yankees, Red Sox, or fireworks nights, plan ahead and try getting tickets when they first go on sale; it’s a good idea to subscribe to the Phillies ticket alerts. They’ll let you know when tickets go on sale, where face value is often the best price. The newsletter will also alert you to theme nights, giveaway nights, etc., so it’s well worth it.

 

citizens Bank park guide phillies tickets

A World Series game is usually a “premium” game.

But if you just want to visit the ballpark, try a game against a West Coast opponent (other than South Jersey native Mike Trout’s Angels, who always draw a crowd); the Marlins only have about 60 fans so they are almost always a cheap game too.

There are several advantages to gathering a group of folks to go to a Phillies game…certain games are available much more cheaply and the group leader will get tickets to a future contest. If you know a lot of Phillies fans, try looking into this.

 

phillies fan club

Just because she doesn’t look enthusiastic doesn’t mean it’s not a good deal!

The Phillies have a “Fightin’ Phils Fan Club”, where for a small membership fee you get a decal, a hat, discounts on merchandise, and best of all, game tickets and pre-sale opportunities. It’s well worth the price, especially if it can get you into a game against, say, the Red Sox at face value.

So that’s a short primer for buying tickets online.

 

phillies tickets box office

Go straight ahead, and then make a right, where the old McFadden’s used to be.

The main ticket office is at the third base gate, and there are other ticket windows around the ballpark. You won’t pay fees at the box office, and that’s a considerable chunk of change. If it’s not a high demand game, you shouldn’t have a problem getting tickets.

 

citizens bank park guide phillies tickets

Neither one is any easier for left handed people.

There are also ticket kiosks at the box office where you can buy and/or print your purchased tickets, and I don’t think you’ll pay the convenience fee using them either. Definitely beats waiting in line for tickets…or paying fees.

 

phillies tickets gametime

You forgot to sign up for the newsletter, didn’t you? Sigh…

If you’re going with a low demand game or failed to plan ahead, include third parties in your search; Gametime is my favorite because they often have the best prices around, and they only show you the better deals. If you want to compare prices with the Phillies website or another third party, be sure to go all the way to the checkout screen to see what you’ll really be paying for tickets. It can be a big difference.

With third party sites, most of the time tickets will become cheaper and more available closer to gametime, so wait until the last minute if you can…remember, though, that ticket sales shut down two hours before game time. If the game is important for you to attend, keep checking for a deal you can live with starting about a week before.

 

citizens bank park guide tickets

These seats should be very cheap on a hot day.

If you’re flexible and can go to a game on a moment’s notice, and demand being what it is for Phillies tickets when they’re good, try waiting for a hot, muggy day or perhaps a cold day in April, when season ticket holders might decide against coming to the ballpark. You might score a worthwhile deal on Gametime especially then. You can also usually land a great deal on a cold day in September if the Phillies are out of the race.

 

phillies tickets scalpers

No, the bar codes do not recycle after 12 years. This ticket is no longer valid.

Even though it is illegal and the Phillies make this clear, I have seen scalpers practically right at the gate of the ballpark. They frequently hang out around the marquee across from the Mike Schmidt statue, and they get desperate to unload their tickets as game time approaches.

When the Phillies are good, scalpers can be tough negotiators, but when the Phillies aren’t performing well brokers are less plentiful and more eager to unload, and you might score a great deal. It’s at your own risk of course, check your tickets for the date and the opponent if you try it.

I’ve written more about buying baseball tickets on Craigslist here. The sellers there aren’t all crooks and you might score something, but treat them the same way you would a scalper…again, check the date and opponent on your ticket, and look for smudges or other irregularities. Trust your gut, especially with a high demand game.

 

 
citizens bank park guide seating

Go ahead, just pick one. They’re all good.

Citizens Bank Park Guide, Part 2: Choosing A Great Seat

There is a general opinion among forum dwellers that most all of the seating at the Bank offers an acceptable view of the action. I don’t disagree; I’ve had what could definitely be called bad seats and have never been terribly unhappy. In most all cases, seats are angled towards home plate, and very little of the field is obstructed even in the furthest seats.

When buying tickets on the Phillies website, you can now choose individual seats on their seating map, which is great for landing aisle seats or two and two in front of each other, whatever works.

I’ve written a much more detailed guide to the seating at Citizens Bank Park here, but I’ll keep it simple and break it down by budget here for you.

 

premium seating phillies

Cushioned seats and cup holders say “We care”.

Premium Phillies Game Seats: Diamond + Hall of Fame Club

As premium seats go, the high end club seats at Citizens Bank Park are fairly reasonable by MLB standards. A full season package in the Hall of Fame Club works out to about $65 a game, and if you pick the right contest you should be able to get a great deal on Gametime. Try for a midweek game against Miami or Colorado.

The Diamond Club seats are directly behind home plate; in the front rows you’re closer to home plate than the pitcher. The seats are padded and wider, and you can order food from your seat.

 

citizens bank park guide diamond club

Nothing says “you’ve made it in life” like a meal in a ballpark club.

Diamond Club members have access to the Diamond Clubhouse Lounge, a beautiful climate-controlled spot with gourmet chef-prepared dining (the burgers are all that). Most of the food and drinks aren’t free, but there are some complimentary side dishes like pasta salads. The Clubhouse also features a view of the batting practice cages.

 

phillies hall of fame club seats

Because we should all have better seats than sportswriters.

The Hall of Fame Club seats are on the 200 press level, just above the suites. In addition to a nice bird’s eye view of the action, these seats are also wide and padded with more leg room. (That matters to big dudes like me.) There’s only a few rows in each section, so it’s easy to get to your seat.

 

citizens bank park guide hall of fame club

Just in case they run out of baseballs during the game.

The large Club behind the seats is also climate-controlled, and includes food and bar stations. The food isn’t included, but this privilege allows folks to wait in short(er) lines for food items (including Chickie’s and Pete’s fries), which can come in handy in a rain delay.

Again, you can sometimes find good deals on third party sites for Club tickets; remember my “uncomfortable weather” tip; I’ve seen tickets available for less than half the face value on low demand nights.

 

phillies field level seats

Popular seats as you can see, even out of the shade.

Large Budget: Field Level Seating

The Infield and Baseline seats at Citizens Bank Park are not cheap, but there isn’t much of an incline and the view is great from just about anywhere. There is a notable price decrease as you move towards the outfield; Section 115 is significantly cheaper than Section 114, for example. The Phillies charge more for the front few rows in the infield sections.

The most important thing I can tell you about the lower level seating here is that the sun beats hard on the first base/right field side late in the day especially. If your timing is wrong it can be fairly miserable on a hot day; I’d go for the third base side.

That aside, most of the lower level seats here are great, and the Bank is a place where lower seating is preferable, for reasons I’ll get to in a minute.

 

Citizens bank park guide upper level

The plentiful ushers might have tissues in the event of a nosebleed.

Medium to Small Budget: Terrace Level Seating

The upper deck seats at Citizens Bank Park are called the Terrace (300 sections) and the Terrace Deck (400 sections). Like in the lower level, the price drops as you get further from home plate.

With the suites, the Hall of Fame level, and open concourses pushing things up, upper levels here are pretty high, and these seats aren’t for the acrophobic. I’m not saying they’re bad seats by any means, though; the Phillies did a nice job of angling upper level seats for a great view of the field.

 

citizens bank park guide escalator

This is the easy part.

Another thing to keep in mind in the is that the 400 seats (Terrace Deck) require about a dozen steps just to get to your section. Try to get your food and take care of nature’s call beforehand, because this can be a pain. If lots of steps are a problem for you, spend a couple of extra bucks for the 300 sections.

Incidentally, if you need to duck out of the weather (Philadelphia gets both ends of weather extremes), the High & Inside Club on the upper concourse is a good spot. The game is on TV there.

 

citizens bank park guide scoreboard porch

The Scoreboard Porch, so named for its lack of view of the scoreboard.

Small Budget: Outfield Seats + Scoreboard Porch

The outfield seating is typical of any ballpark here, but it does have the advantage of being close to Ashburn Alley and the world class Philly food items that I’ll get to in a bit.

The Scoreboard Porch seats are just below the scoreboard; these are pretty far from the field and obviously don’t offer a view from the scoreboard. (There is a smaller scoreboard in right field that works just fine for needed info, however.) These and the upper seats in right field are my least favorite seats in the ballpark, but the Porch is a popular spot for groups if you’re interested.

 

phillies bullpen seats

“Hey pitcher! Your mom is inconsistent!”

In right field, the outfield seats are also close to the bullpens, where you can offer Philly-brand encouragement to opposing pitchers. Remember what I’ve said about the sunlight; right field is the last place to see shade for night games.

 

citizens bank park guide rooftop bleachers

For people ready to catch a 600-foot home run.

Tightwad Budget: Rooftop Bleachers + Standing Room

The Rooftop Bleachers section is a small makeshift-style grandstand above Ashburn Alley in right field, below the neon Liberty Bell; it’s made to look like the stands people built on rooftops across from Connie Mack Stadium. They are, I believe, the cheapest seats in the ballpark, and with good reason…they’re quite a distance from the field. If the game bores you, it does offer people watching in Ashburn Alley.

 

phillies standing room

You know it’s a good spot if it’s where ushers hang out.

Standing room in Citizens Bank Park is a pretty good deal. There are counters around the concourses everywhere in the ballpark to lean on and rest your food, and you might even land some barstool seats in center field if you’re early enough (good luck with that). If you get tired from standing late in the game, the folks at Harry The K’s might let you take a seat.

The Phillies offer a standing room only Ballpark Pass; for a reasonable fee you can attend every home game for a month. Well worth it if you use it a few times.

 

 
citizens bank park guide parking

This is the point where you can shut off your GPS.

Citizens Bank Park Guide, Part 3: The Best Ways To Get To A Phillies Game

In most cases, driving your car is the best and easiest way to get to Citizens Bank Park. There is ample parking in the sports complex, and traffic generally isn’t terrible for a ballpark.

If you’d like to get into some detail about parking at Phillies games, including tailgating, the Taxi Crab and other stuff, check out this much more detailed guide to Citizens Bank Park parking!

The only exception is when there is another event going on, especially an Eagles or Flyers game…if you can’t get to the ballpark very early on such days, you might prefer the Broad Street subway. If there is another event, your best bet is to approach the ballpark from the north on Packer Avenue.

 

phillies parking lots

Coming from Penrose Avenue offers advance warning for when you’re about to see some serious parking.

Penrose Avenue from the west, I’ve learned through experience, is a good route to approach the park, since it’s accessible from I-76 and I-95 and you can turn onto Pattison Avenue towards Penrose getting out, away from the frequently used exits that get backed up after the game.

If you find yourself with tickets for a Friday night game during the summer months, don’t even try to use I-76 eastbound. The traffic headed to the Jersey Shore could well make you miss half of the game. Use I-476 and I-95 north to get around it all, or look into using a Regional Rail train and just make sure you can get back.

 

citizens bank park guide parking map

A helpful and detailed map to help you find parking at the ballpark, once you’ve parked.

The lots owned by the Phillies are all north of Pattison Avenue and mostly west of the ballpark; pre-paid lots for season ticket holders are close but don’t offer any kind of easier out. You can buy a pass ahead of time from the Phillies, but if you’d like something cheaper, easier to exit, or more tailgate friendly, read on.

 

phillies game tailgating

Don’t let a little rain stop your pre-game party!

Tailgating is not permitted in the Phillies lots; for pre-game partying you can use the lots south of Pattison Avenue. Lincoln Financial Field (Eagles) has sizable lots; the Linc is the most popular of tailgating spots. There are ample port-a-potties, and large solar panels covering rows of parking that provide cover or shade from the weather.

East of Lincoln Financial is the Jetro Warehouse, also a popular tailgate destination. Jetro doesn’t offer the “car ports” that the Linc lot does though, and it isn’t any cheaper except from a good distance away, so if tailgating is your thing and you’re early, try the Linc lot first.

 

citizens bank park guide valet parking

If you use my Penrose suggestion, you won’t be too tired from the traffic to pay someone else to park your car.

The Xfinity Live! complex west of the Linc lot offers valet parking for about the same price as other parking (although you’ll probably tip the valet guys a few bucks). It’s just steps away from the ballpark and good if you want to hang out here for the party afterward.

 

taxi crab citizens bank park

Colorful shuttle buses are a part of baseball.

Chickie’s and Pete’s on Packer Avenue valet parks your car for a bit less than what Phillies charge, and they run a free shuttle called the “Taxi Crab” that will take you from their restaurant to the game and back. I’m a fan of this option if you’re making a day of it…enjoy a somewhat less expensive meal at a popular local institution, avoid waiting in line for their famous crab fries, catch a ballgame, and generally avoid the traffic leaving. (Please don’t drink and drive, at least not in that order).

 

oregon steaks philadelphia

Just so you know what it looks like, in case you follow my next suggestion.

There is a church (the Stella Maris Catholic Convent) on 10th Avenue north of the ballpark that is cheaper than the Phillies lots, and it’s also an easier out. Not too long of a walk and a nice view coming towards the ballpark, just use caution crossing Packer Avenue. This spot is just a five minute walk from Oregon Steaks, incidentally, if you want a popular Philly cheesesteak.

Off of Pattison Avenue east of the ballpark, you can often find lots that are a few bucks cheaper and easier to exit.

 

jetro warehouse phillies parking

With bicycle racks at the front entrance for an added level of security.

The lots behind Lincoln Financial Field are further and aren’t any cheaper, but there is also a lot behind the Jetro warehouse that offers a cheaper rate. This one is a hike and dark at night, however, and they claim to prohibit tailgating.

 

citizens bank park guide free street parking

Get any closer and I’ll ticket you, I mean it!

If you love to beat the Man and park for free, your best bet for free street parking might be on the western side of 7th Street north of Packer Avenue; I saw cars parked there and employees of the team coming from that direction. I’ve done this without a problem, but you need to be early and it’s a bit of a hike.

People used to park on South Lawrence Street, but the city started handing out $50+ tickets for this, so I wouldn’t try that one.

 

Phillies game cheap parking

You’ll want to be closer than this.

Speaking for myself, in my opinion the cheaper parking at Citizens Bank Park isn’t worth the considerably longer walk, unless you’d like to get out more easily. My favorite lot is Lot G south of Pattison; it’s almost across the street from the ballpark and it’s easy to exit going west on Pattison towards Penrose.

 

citizens bank park guide broad street line subway

Remember when they called them “stadiums”?

The Distant Second Best Way to Get to Citizens Bank Park: SEPTA

The Broad Street Line is a SEPTA subway line that drops off fans at the NRG Sports Complex Station, a short walk from the ballpark. Because of the crowds, the subway is considered generally safe for games, but I would avoid going north of City Hall.

 

broad street line sports express phillies

Gangway! Philly sports fans coming!

SEPTA runs a Sports Express service to and from Citizens Bank Park on game days; these trains make for a much quicker ride. Usually there are 4-5 of them starting about an hour before the game. Coming from the PATCO Line in South Jersey, the Express will take you straight to the ballpark non-stop from Walnut-Locust. If you get a chance to use the Express, do it. You’ll thank me.

The Broad Street Line isn’t the most pleasant train you’ll ever ride (it probably won’t even make your top 20), but it is good for avoiding traffic, which can be very slow. It’s popular especially with people visiting Philadelphia and staying in the heart of the city, but it doesn’t get too packed like NYC or Chicago ballpark trains do.

 

citizens bank park guide patco

Well yeah, I guess some Phillies fans live in NJ.

Coming from South Jersey where I live, the Broad Street Line is easily accessible from PATCO. Riders can take PATCO to the 12th/13th Street or the 15th/16th Street station, and from there follow the orange signs to the Broad Street Line, about a five-minute walk. Coming back, exit the SEPTA train at Walnut-Locust.

Here’s a Tightwad Tip for PATCO: You can get a discounted round trip transfer ticket that includes the Broad Street ride at the PATCO station, which is slightly cheaper than two SEPTA tokens and considerably cheaper than driving and parking from NJ.

 

septa citizens bank park guide

If you live somewhere on this map, you can take a train or two to the game.

All of SEPTA’s Regional Rail suburban train lines stop at Suburban Station, about a 5-10 minute underground hike to the Broad Street Line. Regional Rail is a much nicer ride from most areas of southeast PA, but check the schedule if you do this and know when the last train leaves.

 

phillies game bicycle parking

The tricky part is making that left turn in ballgame traffic.

Citizens Bank Park isn’t in an area that would be a short bike trek for most people, and I don’t recommend bicycling in the area, but should you make the trip on two wheels, there is a bicycle rack on the north side of the ballpark, and Packer Avenue nearby has a bicycle lane.

Philadelphia has a shared bicycle rental service called “Indego”, and there’s a station next to the NRG subway station. It even has some electric bikes, but there isn’t a large quantity there, so I wouldn’t depend on there being one after the game.

 

 
what to eat at a phillies game cheesesteak

This is why you come to Philadelphia.

Citizens Bank Park Guide, Part 4: What to Eat at Citizens Bank Park

If you’re really interested in making a solid food choice at a Phillies game, I go into much more detail about the menu in my Citizens Bank Park food post here, but here’s a shortened version of all of that. I’m not bothering with the Club items, I’ve already talked about that a bit.

 

citizens bank park guide harry the k's

If you’ve never had cream of artichoke soup before, here’s your chance!

Harry The K’s is named for the Phillies’ late broadcasting legend Harry Kalas. Harry’s has an outdoor but covered seating area behind the left field seats and serves adequate tavern fare at reasonable prices for a ballpark.

Each season the Phillies introduce new food items to Harry’s menu; they might have unusual hot dogs or different kinds of turkey club or roast pork sandwiches. Harry’s is a good spot to find healthy items; I enjoyed a fairly good vegan cheesesteak there some years ago.

 

citizens bank park guide pizza

This nation was founded so people could eat good pizza at the ballpark.

Then there’s Pass and Stow and the Shake Shack, sit down eateries that took over the space once occupied by McFadden’s restaurant. Pass and Stow is mostly for outside libations, but they do have a brick oven pizza on their menu, and Shake Shack of course features the ever-popular Shackburger, fries and shakes, all of which I can testify are very good.

 

citizens bank park guide campo's

This is a Campo’s “Heater” chicken cheesesteak sandwich with the “Works”. Ask for it by name.

If you want to enjoy the taste of Philly stuff at Citizens Bank Park, head out to Ashburn Alley in center field…that’s where you’ll find the two iconic cheesesteak sandwiches: Tony Luke’s and Campo’s. I’m a Campo’s guy, but Tony Luke’s does have a good roast pork and provolone sandwich with broccoli rabe. For a great and spicy cheesesteak, get the “Heater” from Campo’s. (Ask for it with the “Works”!)

 

phillies federal donuts

No need to get your donuts at the state level.

But don’t pass on the other Philly favorites here…there’s P.J. Whelihan’s and their flavorful boneless wings, amazing Federal Donuts and their chicken sandwich, and of course the popular Philly favorite…

 

citizens bank park guide crab fries

Tell them you want the ones that spilled out too.

Chickie’s and Pete’s crab fries…crinkle-cut fries with crab seasoning, one of the most iconic food items in Philly. I’ve talked about Chickie’s and Pete’s on Packer Avenue earlier…at the restaurant you get two cups of cheese sauce, here you have to pay extra for that. Might be worth using the Taxi Crab, just saying.

 

phillies manco pizza

Mr. Manco likes to make pizza with his alter ego.

Manco & Manco’s Pizza is new but long overdue; it’s a very popular pizza shop from Ocean City NJ’s boardwalk, and it’s much better than the generic pizza. (Philly area folks don’t excuse bad pizza.) Colbie’s Southern Fried Chicken has chef-inspired fried chicken sandwiches, and they’re part-owned by former Phillies slugger Ryan Howard, so you’re supporting local baseball.

 

citizens bank park guide bulls bbq

Here’s your tip of the day.

Finally, don’t miss Bull’s BBQ, named for 1970s Phillies slugger Greg Luzinski, who chats and poses with fans most games. The large BBQ area in the left field corner serves up first-class pulled pork, big turkey legs, addictive mac and cheese, and the “Bull Dog”, a huge glazed kielbasa. You can create a nice sampler plate. As ballpark BBQ goes, it’s one of my faves.

Just about everything I’ve tried in Ashburn Alley has been great; it’s worth the few extra bucks to get your Phillies game grub on there. Get there early; it gets crowded.

 

phillies hatfield hot dogs

Hopefully this helps you find the hot dogs at Citizens Bank Park.

The rest of the concourse areas mostly feature generic ballpark items; aside from Hatfield hot dogs (another local legend), the cheesesteaks, fries, wings and other stuff is adequate but unremarkable. The sausage and pepper sandwiches are very good. Of course, you can get Richman’s ice cream in a small Phillies helmet.

The Phillies occasionally have Dollar Dog Nights; it’s a popular promotion but lines can be long.

 

bring your own food citizens bank park pastaficios

Nothing gives a deli credibility like a decorated van.

Finally, you can bring your own food into Citizens Bank Park (in a 16*16*8 bag), and there’s some decent selections not far away. I’ve already talked about the Taxi Crab from Chickie’s and Pete’s; bringing takeout crab fries will save you a few bucks.

If you’re using the Taxi Crab, the Chickie’s plaza also has a popular deli called Pastaficio’s, it’s a prime spot to order a high quality and cheaper sandwich you can bring in with you. (You can take my word on that.)

 

citizens bank park guide bring food

Check them out…they ain’t kiddin’!

My favorite trick as a South Jersey native is to go upstairs after exiting the PATCO train, and stopping at Nuts 2 You, which is in the path to the Broad Street subway. They have an amazing selection of fresh roasted peanuts, snacks, and candy, and the still warm peanuts keep me fed all night for just a few bucks.

 

 
citizens bank park guide kids

Parents aren’t allowed in the habitrail, but it doesn’t stop them from trying.

Citizens Bank Park Guide, Part 5: Bringing The Kids

The home of the Phillies is one of the most kid-friendly ballparks I’ve been to; there are two play areas here that are both great fun for little ones. The Phanatic Phun Zone features a habitrail that makes me jealous when I see my kids running around it, and The Yard in the left field corner has a wiffle ball field shaped like a mini-version of the ballpark.

Kids can also pretend to operate a concession stand, and get started young living the dream of being a ballpark concession worker. The Phillies smartly placed only one entrance at the Phun Zone, so parents can safely wait there.

 

bring the kids to citizens bank park

It’s not actually 401 to straightaway center; unless that’s some metric measurement.

The Yard in the left field corner is an artificial turf (normally frowned upon in baseball, but probably a good idea here) wiffle ball field that’s made to look like a miniature Citizens Bank Park. And it’s got a short porch in left…if you get a hold of one, you can easily reach the scoreboard with it!

You have to wait in line to get your licks at the plate, but the kids can play in the field as much as they like. It’s a great opportunity to teach your child the value of strong defense up the middle. The Yard gets crowded pretty fast, so try to get there when the Left Field gates open (a half hour before the rest of the gates).

 

taking the kids to a phillies game

Phillies employees can put a curve on a wiffle ball pitch with the best of them.

If you’re bringing the kids, the first base side is usually better, since the Phanatic Phun Zone is near the first base entrance and the Yard is in the right field corner. It’s also a better view of the Phanatic dancing on the Phillies dugout. However, keep in mind that this spot can see some serious sun; if that’s a concern try the third base side, or bring water and sunscreen.

If you want to save a few bucks on tickets for the kids, check out the fan clubs. Membership is relatively cheap and usually includes two game tickets, plus souvenirs like a drawstring bag that you wouldn’t think to buy otherwise; both clubs include discounted ticket opportunities. The Phillies don’t have many “run the bases” days, but the fan club offers front of the line access for it, and that’s well worth it if it’s in your plans.

 

citizens bank park with kids

“Go ahead, swing for the fences kid!”

Kids under two get in free, but they have to sit on the parent’s lap (which is mighty difficult for nine innings), and you can either check in a stroller or fit it under your seat.

There are Phanatic Kids Corner stands selling smaller dogs and PB&J sandwiches at reduced prices for kids, so you can save a few bucks on food that way…and don’t forget about bringing in your own snacks.

Finally, you can bring the kid to the Guest Services booth and get them a First Game Certificate…they’ll treasure that forever.

 

 
citizens bank park guide photo ops

If you didn’t know who he was, you probably wouldn’t let him in either.

Citizens Bank Park Guide, Part 6: Photo-Ops + Other Tips

I’m listing some of my favorite photo-ops at Citizens Bank Park, you’ll want some shots of these things when you go:

 

citizens bank park guide liberty bell

It’s even cooler at night, just saying.

Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops, #1) The Liberty Bell. Try to get video of this after a Phillie hits a home run or the Phillies win. It’s also cool to get close to it and see how huge it really is.

 

citizens bank park guide carlton statue

This statues talks about as much as Lefty did. He let his curveball do the talking.

Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops, #2) Phillies Statues. Steve Carlton, Mike Schmidt, Richie Ashburn, Robin Roberts, and longtime announcer Harry Kalas are all enshrined at the ballpark; Harry’s statue is inside the ballpark near the restaurant that bears his name. Everyone in Philly loved Harry.

 

citizens bank park photo op

Blending a ballpark in with a bunch of tall buildings is harder than it looks.

Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops, #3) The City Skyline View. The Phillies got some grief for not placing the ballpark in the heart of the city, but this view works. Check it out from the upper level concourse in left field. (Nice view of the Walt Whitman Bridge there too.) Worth the trek up the ramps.

 

philadelphia baseball hall of fame

Does anyone think the Athletics should move back to Philly? I’m in that camp.

Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops, #4) The Philly Baseball Walk of Fame. Some very good teams played baseball here; not just the Phillies but also Connie Mack’s Athletics. You can find this in Ashburn Alley, on the other side of the batter’s eye wall. It’s a fun timeline to read.

 

citizens bank park photo ops

I was these kids’ age when most of these guys were playing.

Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops, #5) The Diamond Club Mural. You may need to ask permission from an usher if you’re not a ticket holder to see it, but inside the Diamond Club is a very cool mural of a clubhouse full of Phillies greats; in the picture are Mike Schmidt, Steve Carlton, Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, and of course, the Phanatic, Harry Kalas and Richie Ashburn. Pete Rose isn’t in the picture…he’s represented by fallen rose petals.

 

connie mack stadium philadelphia

It would have been a bear writing a fan’s guide for this one.

Citizens Bank Park Photo-Ops, #6) Connie Mack Stadium Replica. Connie Mack Stadium was my father’s favorite ballpark; I unfortunately was born too late to visit it. But they do have a replica in the Hall of Fame Club, again, you might need permission to go in and see it.

And last but most definitely not least…

 

Citizens bank park guide phanatic

I think Stallone chose to film Rocky in Philadelphia because he liked the Phanatic.

Citizens Bank Park Video-Ops, #1) The Phanatic. The Phillie Phanatic, the best mascot in sports, drives his ATV out on to the field in the middle of the fifth as the cleaning crew smooths out the bases…he’s always a blast to watch, carrying on and behaving like a Philly fan (check out my interview with original Phanatic Dave Raymond here). He also dances on top of the Phillies dugout in the late innings, and his antics can get R-rated at times. Get some video of him if you can…you’ll laugh.

Feeling smarter about your next Phillies game? Great! Just a couple more things.

 

xfinity live citizens bank park

Personally I liked the Spectrum better.

Xfinity Live! across the street is kind of a sports mall food court, with Philly sports-themed restaurants like the Spectrum Grille and the Broad Street Bullies Pub, and very large TV screens showing games featuring local teams, anything a fan needs for a post-game party or to gather with other Philly fans.

It’s definitely not the cheapest place for a post-game meal or drinks, but it’s easily the most convenient, and you have choices for whatever grub you’re interested in, including Geno’s Steaks and Lorenzo and Sons Pizza.

 

philly fans citizens bank park guide

Oh, like your city doesn’t do this stuff…

Finally, about those Phillies fans. For half a century now, the story of Eagles fans throwing snowballs at Santa Claus has been cited as proof that Philadelphia is home to the meanest, most hideous sports fans. I’ve written about the Santa Claus story here; give it a read if you’re not familiar with it. The actual story is probably very different than what you imagine, and it’s actually pretty funny. R.I.P. Frank Olivo.

In truth most Phillies fans are perfectly well behaved and can be as passionate as any in the game. Yes, there are some obnoxious ones, like there are in every city, but you probably won’t encounter much more than good-natured heckling if you come here wearing Mets or Nationals gear. (Cowboys or Penguins gear might be a different story.) Don’t poke the bear and you’ll be fine.

 

citizens bank park fan assistance

Don’t forget the space. You’d be surprised how many fans leave out the space.

If any fans get on your nerves or you have some other problem, you can send a text message to the staff and they’ll come running. The ushers and staff are very nice here, and will make you think Philly is full of nice people after all.

Which it is.

 

I hope that this Citizens Bank Park guide has been helpful to you and saves you some time, money, and aggravation at your next Phillies game…because after all, this is supposed to be fun! Have a look below at some more tips for the home of the Phillies…and please support our sponsors.

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you at the yard!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

 

Ultimate Citi Field Guide: New York Mets Game Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

This is your complete, all-inclusive, Amazin’ly helpful Citi Field guide – everything you need to know about getting tickets, seating, getting to the ballpark and food at the beautiful home of the New York Mets!

Citi Field is well worth a visit for any baseball fan…it’s a eye-catching ballpark with terrific sightlines (in most cases), and possibly the best food selection in the major leagues. Oh, and a good team to boot these days. Sure, go to Yankee Stadium if you want to see the history and all that, but don’t make a trip to New York and miss out on the first class ballpark in Flushing.

 

citi field guide

Here’s a few helpful ground rules for a game at Citi Field.

I’ve gathered plenty of knowledge about the place and am happy to share it with you…there’s a lot to know, especially about getting here and the food, so let’s break this down:

Finding The Best Deals on Mets Tickets
Choosing A Great Seat
The Best Way To Get To Citi Field
What To Eat At Citi Field
Citi Field With Kids
Great Citi Field Photo-Ops + Other Tips

Lots to cover here, so after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started!

Gametime has your cheap Mets tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

 
mets tickets box office

The “secret” spot for getting tickets.

Citi Field Guide, Part 1: Finding Cheap Mets Tickets

OK, so your first job is to get tickets to the game. You have numerous options for getting Mets tickets, and you can save a bunch of money choosing the right one. And that depends on whether you’ve chosen a low or high demand game.

High demand games are Opening Day obviously, as well as any contests against the Yankees, Red Sox, or Phillies, so pick a game against Oakland or other west coast opponent if you want a cheaper ticket. Similarly, Friday and Saturday games sell many more tickets than weeknight games, and July and August games are more populated than April or May games. You could find a steal on tickets for a game against Colorado on an April weeknight.

 

citi field guide mets tickets

There’s nothing like free swag to make a ballpark your Friday destination.

As you’re reading this, you should sign up for the Mets’ ticket alert newsletter. The newsletter will alert you to dynamic pricing bargains, pre-sales (where you can often get tickets for Yankees games at face price), and giveaway nights. The Mets offer discounts that you’ll see in the emails, including waiving ticket fees on occasion. You also might score a nice deal on your birthday.

If you order through the website, you’ll probably need the MLB Ballpark app; have the tickets loaded onto your phone and you won’t need to remember to bring them.

 

citi field guide ticket discounts

Did you know that Mr. Met gets cash rewards with his Citi card? You can too!

Remember the name of the ballpark…if you aren’t a Citi credit card holder, I highly recommend that you sign up and ask for one. In fact I ordered my Citi MasterCard for this very reason. Citi cardholders get deals on tickets, food and merchandise, and you may have access to pre-sales before non-Citi people do.

You can also sign up for the Mets fan club, Club Mets, which includes tickets and other benefits that make it well worth the price. Get the kids into the Mr. Met Kids Club too…although you might have to go to a few games to make that worth it.

 

cheasp mets tickets box office

Go ahead, try it! Come on, you want to be cool, don’t you?

Aside from the Mets’ website, you can also obviously buy tickets at the box office like we did in the days before electricity. Remember that there’s more than one ticket office at the ballpark, and if the front gate ticket office has long lines you can find another gate and ticket office. Or use the ticket kiosks…you’ll be amazed at how fast they spit out your tickets, and for some reason people don’t use them.

 

citi field tickets gametime

Take a left here.

For a high demand game, you’re best off planning ahead and getting your tickets from the Mets as soon as they go on sale; for low demand games you can choose a third party site like Gametime and wait as late as you can for prices to come down (they usually shut down sales two hours before game time). Try to get tickets from a season ticket holder; these tix include some nice club access, great on hot days or cold nights.

If you choose to go third party, remember the fees and go all the way to the checkout screen to compare. See what you’re really paying; there can be a sizable difference.

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citi field guide tickets scalpers

Be smart. Bring a seating chart.

 

In my Mets game travels I haven’t seen a whole lot of scalpers; you can generally find a few on the way to the ballpark from the 7 or LIRR stations. In those paths, incidentally, you might find someone with extras willing to part with them at a better price. There is a radius around Citi Field where scalping is illegal, and the train stations are within that radius, so be mindful.

If you do use a scalper, check the date and the opponent on the ticket, and look for any type of uneven cuts or anything.

I’ve written more about buying baseball tickets on Craigslist here; but as you probably know, there’s no checks in place on Craigslist. Most people selling tickets are legit, actually, but treat them as you would a scalper and check the tickets carefully, especially for a big game. If something doesn’t feel right, don’t buy it.

 
citi field guide seats

Hmmm…so many seats to choose from here.

Citi Field Guide, Part 2: Choosing A Great Seat

OK, so you’ve decided to get tickets, now you have to decide where to sit. This is a big decision, believe me…part of enjoying the Citi Field experience is choosing a good seat. I speak from experience on that.

If you’re interested, and have plenty of time on your hands, I go into much more detail about Citi Field seating here; but for this guide, I’ll try to keep it simple and help you get the best bang for every budget.

 

Mets tickets delta club

This is a good reason to work harder.

If cost is no issue to you (baseball can always find a way to test the meaning of “cost is no issue”), go for the Delta Club seats; they are large, padded, and behind home plate, and they include access to the Delta Club and its chef-prepared food offerings. But if you want club access with good food and don’t quite want to pay that much, the Hyundai Club seats have a sweet birds’ eye view, and a club with food and non-alcoholic beverages included in the ticket.

 

Citi Field Guide Delta Club

Because gourmet food just makes baseball better. And vice versa.

The food for both of these clubs is high quality, and you can also order food service and have it brought to your seat. If you get the really high end Clover seats in front of the Deltas, your ticket includes  complimentary food from anywhere in the ballpark, but you’ll pay a price for that.

 

citi field guide field level seats

Where you can easily turn away from an annoying fan on your left.

For medium budgets…again, you’ll be defining “medium”, but just saying…the Field Level seats at first and third base and beyond are a decent deal. For some games, just being one section over from the Delta Clubs can be a triple digit difference in price. The field level seats are angled toward the infield, so you can a comfortable view without turning your neck.

 

jim beam highball club citi field

Cookie Crumz cookies with Mets sprinkles, a reason to get Highball Club access.
(photo courtesy of Maggie Wiggin)

If your budget is small to medium, I recommend going for the Promenade Box seats, closer to home plate if you can. It’s a good view for upper level seating, and you’ll have access to the Jim Beam Highball Club, which is worth it just for the outstanding food offerings.

 

promenade level seats citi field

Walk by quickly so people behind the glass can watch the game with their chicken and biscuit sandwich.

The 400 level of seating is considerably pricier than the Promenade Reserved 500 seats in the section above them, but you also have the peace of mind of no obstructed view (more on that in a bit). If you still want the club access without the additional price, you can try to get Promenade Reserved seats from a season ticket holder. (This is one of my favorite Citi Field tricks.) Season ticket holders get access to the Caesars Sportsbook restaurant in left field, the Highball Club, and the Piazza 31 Club. Try ‘em all out for size.

 

citi field guide coca cola corner

“No Pepsi, Coke.”

The Coca-Cola Corner seats are the sections underneath the big Coca-Cola sign in right field; these are pretty affordable seats. The view isn’t great, and the sun beats down hard on these sections well beyond any other section. But there’s a fun play area and a separate concourse.

 

citi field guide left field landing seats

Don’t let the dudes wearing suits fool you. They probably got left field landing tickets too.

The Coca-Cola Corner seats, like the Left Field Landing seats also on the Mezzanine (Excelsior) Level, also include access to the Piazza 31 Club behind home plate. This is helpful not just for better food choices, a nice view of 7 trains coming in, and a space to duck out of the climate, but also to avoid having to move to another level just to get to the other side. Useful knowledge if you use the wrong entrance.

 

mets game outfield seats

Not great seats, but some people buy them. The Mets are appreciated around here.

If you just want as cheap a seat as possible, the Promenade Outfield seats are the cheapest in the ballpark as of this writing, and for good reason…they’re high and far, especially in left field, and on a windy day the upper left field seats can be unnerving.

 

citi field guide obstructed views

This can put a damper on your Mets game experience.

You also might have to deal with the obstructed views from glass landings on the Promenade Reserved level. To keep it simple, stay out of the low rows (1-3), or at least look for a high-numbered seat in a row. Seat 1 is always on the home plate side. If all else fails, you can call the Mets Fan Assistance (646-438-5000) and they should help you find a better spot.

 

cheap mets tickets standing room

It’s not an ideal standing room view, but you can toss some cornhole bags if you get bored.

Finally, for standing room at Citi Field, you have counters to lean on throughout the lower level concourse, so you can usually stake out a relatively comfortable spot. Lots of SRO types get their Amazin’ Mets pass, which includes entry to all of the games in a month for a reasonable price if you use it a lot.

Center field is a popular spot for standing room, probably because of the superb food selection. (I’ll get to that, I promise.)

 
best way to get to citi field MTA

Didn’t “LIRR” play guitar for Primus?

Citi Field Guide, Part 3: The Best Way(s) To Get To Citi Field

I stated in my guide to Yankee Stadium that it takes skill to drive a car in New York City, and Queens is no different than the Bronx in this regard. If you’re a first time visitor to this ballpark especially, I highly recommend against driving to a game, but if you insist, I’ll help you with that.

But first, the best, easiest, and probably cheapest way to get to Citi Field is by train…either the MTA 7 train, or the Long Island Rail Road.

 

citi field guide mta 7 train

The purple 7 is synonymous with Mets baseball.

The 7 train is cheaper, but it’s considerably slower and gets much more crowded; it’s elevated most of the way through Queens from Manhattan, and the ride isn’t appealing to the eye unless you like graffiti. It’s 19 stops from Times Square to the Mets-Willets Point station; if you can get on the express (the one with the diamond around the 7), it’s just nine, so use the Express if you can. The MTA usually runs several express trains back to Manhattan after the game…definitely wait for a diamond train if you can.

The nice thing about the 7, other than sharing a ride with lots of Mets fans, is that the train drops you right there at the ballpark, and it’s pretty cool to watch Citi Field come into view, so get a seat on the left side of the train if you can.

The 7 train is nowhere near as bad as Braves reliever John Rocker was once reported as saying (Google it if you want to know). Just be aware that for Mets games it gets packed, especially after the game. You’ll probably be standing after the game unless you wait for a few cars to leave.

 

citi field guide lirr stairway

The easy-to-find stairway to the Mets ballpark!

All of this is why I prefer the LIRR; the Mets-Willets Point station of the Port Washington Branch is a few more steps away from the ballpark, but the LIRR train is a much more pleasant ride. It’s a couple bucks more than the 7, but you’ll likely have a seat (and a more comfortable one than on the 7), and it’s just two stops from Penn Station in Manhattan and can be used from many points in the other direction.

Believe me when I tell you, the LIRR is worth both the extra few bucks and the extra walk, even if you have to do it on both ends. Standing on a 7 train for 19 stops after a ballgame can be rough. (Done that, and I’m happy to share tips based on hard experience too.)

Wherever you’re coming from, those are basically the two trains you should find your way to. Unless you are indeed taking on the monumentally frustrating task of driving your car to and from Citi Field.

Never Drive To Citi Field Without A Plan…

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citi field guide driving and parking

Pretty much your main roads to get to Citi, right here.

The first thing you need to know is that traffic backs up considerably within an hour before game time (naw…really?). In my experiences I’ve observed that the worst traffic backups come from the Whitestone Expressway (25A) north of the ballpark; the Van Wyck Expressway (I-678) and Grand Central Parkway both dump traffic onto Whitestone at their Citi Field exits. If you can avoid that junction, do it, or just get here earlier if you can.

 

mets parking lot

See how they’re blocking your way out?

Similarly, after the game the Citi Field parking lot is, of course, a parking lot, and can take a very long time to exit. The Mets’ “A” parking lot north of the ballpark is where the employees park, but you can get a spot there if you’re early enough, and it’s an easier out onto the major roads. You should be able to buy a pre-paid parking pass from the Mets, but jump on that as soon as you can.

 

Prepaid parking mets games

Apparently the Mets give themselves a good grade for their parking.

You can also pre-pay for your parking; while you won’t find much in the way of garages close to the ballpark, you should be able to find something in NYC you can use close to a 7 station, and from there take a cheap train ride to the ballpark. You’ll still come out ahead in cost and aggravation if you do it right.

 

citi field guide southfield parking lot

Don’t mind the puddles. It’s cheap and close.

Finally, here’s my favorite Citi Field parking trick…the Southfield commuter lot across the street from the ballpark doesn’t kick in its game rate ($30 as I write this) until 9:00 for day games or noon for night games…so get there early, park for a fin, and take a train somewhere in NYC and enjoy a day in the city and a deli sandwich or something. Come back to the ballpark, enjoy the game, and it’s a short walk back to your car next to the suckers who paid $25 more.

 

free street parking at citi field

Ballpark in view, just make sure your parking brake is good.

You can find some free street parking west of the ballpark; the side streets along 114th and 114th Street itself usually have some space where you can park with no meters. It requires crossing a freeway exit ramp to get there, but it’s easy enough with basic caution, and this spot is almost as close as the $30 west lots at the ballpark. I’ve read accounts of people having success with this, but this is Queens, so try it at your own risk. I wouldn’t park a Benz there.

 

citi field guide bicycle

They inexplicably don’t yet have Citibikes at Citi Field yet. But here’s a picture of what they look like in case they ever do.

Honestly, Citi Field isn’t a place where I’d ride a bicycle to the game, even though the Mets have bike racks. But if you do try it, there’s plenty of NYC bicycle maps available on the web to plan your route; it’s 9.3 miles and about an hour ride from Grand Central if that’s your starting point.

I also recommend against taxis or rideshares…it will be a long ride with the meter running, especially after the game. Find a way to get to the LIRR if you’re willing to shell out that much.

 
citi field guide food

Citi Field has you covered even for waffles and ice cream. With Mets colored sprinkles again.
(photo courtesy of Maggie Wiggin)

Citi Field Guide, Part 4: What To Eat At Citi Field

I’m happy to help you decide what to eat at Citi Field, but there are so many great options here…the Mets might have the best food selection in baseball. So I’ve devoted an entire blog post to Citi Field food…with appetizing pictures and everything. You can read that here; there’s much more detail about the restaurants and healthier items too.

But for this guide, I’ll go over just a few things you should know to help make the truly challenging decision of what to eat.

 

citi field guide shake shack

Equally impressive without the wax paper.

First, the center field food court…called the Taste of The City…is the spot for the classic NYC eats, and there’s a bunch of them. Most prominent is the Shake Shack and their Shackburgers, which are so popular that people will miss World Series innings waiting in line for one.

 

pat lafrieda mets game

Sometimes it’s as simple as keeping the buns warm.

You can also find Pat LaFrieda’s steak sandwich cart here. LaFrieda is one of the prime purveyors of beef in NYC, which is probably saying a lot, and if you like caramelized onions, you’ll like this sandwich.

There’s also the Metropolitan Fry Factory, with crazy editions of loaded fries AND deep fried hot dogs, and the Tater Kegs from Amazin’ Chicken Co.

In the right field corner is the World’s Fare Market, where you can find healthier items. The Lobster Shack with expensive but tasty lobster rolls, and also a market with sushi and gluten free items.

Believe it or not, I am just scratching the surface and haven’t covered a wealth of other items, but this Citi Field guide is already clocking in at 4,000 words and there’s other stuff you need to know. Again, have a look at the full food post here (there’s even pictures of dessert waffles!).

 

citi field guide burgers

Pat LaFrieda beef and Nathan’s fries…that is a first class meal regardless.

But I will add this…even the basic stuff at Citi Field is pretty good. Nathan’s hot dogs (and their equally iconic fries), Premio sausages and Pat LaFrieda beef burgers are all very good, and the Mets even offer some great condiment stands with things like sauerkraut and NYC onion relish. There is no shame in going for the generic food items here.

So to keep it simple: think center field food court, right field market, and Hudson Club. And generic = just fine.

 

white bear flushing

It’s a train stop away and has good cheap dumplings, but it’s a lot of work to get it to the ballpark.

Finally, you can bring your own food into Citi Field (the Mets allow a 16*16*8 bag and don’t specifically prohibit food), but there isn’t much as far as takeout joints within a stone’s throw from the ballpark. Or a $3 train ride for that matter.

You could find some good ethnic eats on Main Street in Flushing a train station away (it’s actually not a long walk), but this is a lot of hassle just to save a few bucks. Bring a bottle of water since you’ll be thirsty and maybe some peanuts.

 
bringing kids to citi field

Dunk the Cardinals fan! Well, okay, dunk the Mets employee with a Cardinals jersey!

Citi Field Guide, Part 5: Bringing The Kids To A Mets Game

The Mets made their ballpark kid-friendly, with lots of activities both in the Mr. Met area in center field and also in the Coca-Cola Corner concourse. Kids can dunk a Mets employee dressed in the visiting team’s gear, play on a wiffle ball field, and toss cornhole bags in the Corner.

Sunday is by far the best day to take the kids, with a bunch of activities like face painting and a promo item for the little ones. (Arrive early for the swag.) Plus they’re usually day games, so the kids get home at a reasonable hour. Sundays include kids running the bases (the “Mr. Met Dash”), which is always a popular promotion.

 

mr. met kids club

You can find these booths at the ballpark, but you’ll already be there then.

If you’re bringing the little ones, have a look at the Mr. Met Kids Club and see if it’s worth your while. With membership your kid gets ticket vouchers, discounts on gear, and front of the line privileges on run-the-bases days…and you’ll want front of the line access for that. You can even take the kids to a Brooklyn Cyclones game with your free vouchers.

You can find discounted food items and kids meals at generic food stands, especially near the kids area in center field. Remember the bag policy; if you need to save money, bring your own bags of snacks for the kids to munch on.

Keep in mind the shade areas as well. If you’re sitting in right field and in the Coca-Cola Corner especially, bring a hat and sunscreen for the kids.

Finally, I wouldn’t take kids onto the 7 train, not because it’s dangerous but because trains get very crowded especially after a game, and it’s tough enough to keep an eye on little ones in NYC. If you can, either drive to the game and get there as early as you can, or use the LIRR.

 
Jackie Robinson Rotunda Citi Field

Wait! There’s still some stuff to see!

Citi Field Guide, Part 6: Citi Field Photo-Ops + Other Tips

If you’re a Mets fan especially, or a baseball fan in general, the Mets Hall of Fame and Museum is worth a visit. It’s got plaques of Mets greats, the 1969 and 1986 World Series trophies, a jersey worn by Tom Seaver and multiple other tributes to great Mets moments.

 

citi field guide mets hall of fame

We miss you, Tom Terrific.

It’s on the right as you enter the Jackie Robinson Rotunda gates, and you should go through as soon as you get in because it can get crowded. Conveniently, after jogging your Mets fan sentiment, the Hall drops you right into the Mets gift shop.

 

jackie robinson citi field

Jackie signs the deal with Branch Rickey’s favorite cigar manufacturer.

Despite the fact that he didn’t play for the Mets, it’s fair to recognize Jackie Robinson, since he broke the color barrier here in New York City, in the National League. The Jackie Robinson Rotunda inside the main entrance gates is indeed impressive and a fitting tribute to one of baseball’s greatest heroes. You can check out the nine values he was committed to and see beautifully arranged large scale photos of the man and his life.

Along with the Jackie Robinson Rotunda, there are some popular photo-ops at Citi Field, and I’m throwing in one most people probably don’t think of, at no extra charge.

 

citi field kurt smith

Still the Ultimate Answer.

Citi Field Photo-Ops, #1) The 42. Inside the main entrance in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda is the number 42, about six feet high reminding us all of the Ultimate Answer. This is a very popular photo-op, though, so you might want to wait until after the game to pose with this one.

 

mets game photo ops big apple

Two world class ballpark enthusiasts at the Shea Stadium home run apple.

Citi Field Photo-Ops, #2) The Shea Stadium Big Apple. The Mets brought over the home run apple from Shea Stadium; it’s on the plaza in the path from the 7 train station to the ballpark, so you can’t miss it. It’s a favorite spot for traveling fans to pose, like I did with my good friend Joe Mock of Baseball Parks here.

 

citi field guide hyundai club

Unfortunately you can’t test drive it in the concourse.

Citi Field Photo-Ops, #3) The Mets Hyundaimobile. As far as I know, this car is still inside the ballpark, just outside the Hyundai Club level. If you’re a Mets fan, you’d love driving it.

 

citi field guide ebbets field

Preserving the memories of Ebbets Field. Except it’s in Queens. And a different team plays there.

Citi Field Photo-Ops, #4) The View From The 7 Station. Citi Field is a quite impressive on the outside, and approaching it from either the 7 or LIRR gives a sense of both its size and its classic ballpark structure. You get something of a sense of what Ebbets Field was like except for the big parking lots.

 

coca cola sign citi field

Fortunately, they didn’t bring New Coke to Citi Field.

Citi Field Photo-Ops, #5) The Coca-Cola Sign. If you can, you might want to actually get some video of the Coca-Cola sign in the right field corner, especially at night…the sign changes colors, has white suds flowing through it, etc. It can be fun to watch if the Mets aren’t holding your interest.

And don’t miss this one…

 

citi field flushing location

As you can see, this modern urban ballpark blends in seamlessly with its surroundings.

Citi Field Photo-Ops, #6) Bonus tip! The View of Queens. Take a trip to the concourse behind the Coca-Cola Corner and take a look at the neighborhood this beautiful ballpark is in…muffler and auto glass shops for blocks. One of my favorite things about Citi Field is this beautiful ballpark in the heart of a hard urban community. It’s classic NYC.

Finally, I’ll concede that Citi Field does have some flaws…like some less than stellar seats and insufficient access by car…but it’s truly a beautiful ballpark to walk around in and the food selection is second to none. It’s a great place to see a game if you know what you’re doing, and it’s an ideal counterpoint to its neighbor in the Bronx. Citi Field has grown on me a lot, and it will on you too.

 

citi field guide thanks

Now you can do Citi Field right!

I hope that you’ve found this Citi Field guide to be helpful in saving money and avoiding the pitfalls…if you’d like to know more about the Mets ballpark, you can check out this much more detailed seating guide with lots of helpful tips, and this complete guide to the duly impressive food menu at Citi Field. If you’re doing a NYC baseball trip, be sure to read my guide to Yankee Stadium too!

Thanks for visiting…please support our sponsors, and I’ll see you at the Yard!

Note: This Citi Field guide contains affiliate links. If you use the links to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission at no extra cost to you. We appreciate your support!

Fenway Park Guide | Best Boston Red Sox Game Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

Here it is my baseball fan friends…your complete, incredibly useful and necessary Fenway Park guide! I’ve put together my best tips for visiting one of my favorite ballparks, and I’m sharing them with you to help you not only save money at Fenway Park, but also get the best bang for your ballpark buck. Whether you’re a frequent or a first time visitor, there’s plenty of useful information here for you.

Fenway Park, I often tell people, is not for amateurs. I learned from my first couple of games there that there are lots of pitfalls to avoid…insanely priced tickets and parking, obstructed views, distant seats, crowded trains, game day traffic, you name it. Think of anything that’s exasperating about going to a ballgame, and Fenway’s got you covered.

 

Fenway Park Guide

Baseball as it is meant to be watched.

But when you know what you’re doing, Fenway is one of the greatest experiences in baseball…an opportunity to take in the experience the way fans have for over 100 years, surrounded by beautiful green walls and red seats, in a space with location-necessitated dimensions…most notably that imposing 37-foot wall in left field.

This essential Fenway Park guide will help you avoid the pitfalls and fully enjoy a memorable Red Sox baseball experience. I’ve broken it down into parts for your easy reference:

Find Deals on Red Sox Tickets
Choosing The Best Seats
The Best Ways To Get To Fenway Park
What to Eat at Fenway Park
Fenway Park With Kids
Photo-Ops and Must-Sees

So after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started!

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fenway park tickets

You’ll need these, just saying.

Fenway Park Guide, Part 1: Finding Deals on Red Sox Tickets

There are, of course, multiple ways to get tickets to a Red Sox game…and it may take a little effort, but if you plan properly you can save a lot of money on tickets. If you really want to get detailed about it, I’ve written this much more in-depth guide to finding cheap Red Sox tickets, but for this guide I’ll keep it relatively simple.

A big part of the equation is the game you plan to see. High demand games at Fenway are any games against the Yankees, July and August weekend contests, and Opening Day. The Red Sox are aware of this, making tickets available for low demand contests first before the season starts. Low demand contests are games during the week, non-Yankees games in April and May, and September games if the Sox aren’t contending.

 

fenway park guide tickets

Ah, there’s still a few available!

So if you just want to visit Fenway, choose a midweek game in April or May…and go for a day game if you can, because you’ll likely want to be in the sun in Boston during those months. Try to choose a game against an opponent that is over 1,000 miles away and not doing well.

If you choose a low demand game, definitely go through a third party rather than through the Red Sox. I have paid a third of the face price for pretty good seats at Sox games doing this.

 

fenway park yankees games

Now you know what gift to get for lady Sox fans.

However, if you want to pay as little as possible for a July weekend game against the Yankees, going through the Red Sox website (or the box office if you can, to avoid the fees) might be your best bet.

You need to plan way ahead for this…sign up for the Red Sox ticket alert newsletter so you know exactly when tickets go on sale and get them at face price, which is probably the cheapest that you’ll find them. The newsletter will alert you to any specials, too.

The Sox also sell multi-game packs of tickets, so you can see a Yankees game if you’re willing to pay full price for a midweek game against Oakland. They’ll let you know.

 

fenway park game day tickets

It’s tough waiting in line just steps away from sausage vendors.

If you live in the Boston area or know someone who does, you can get your tickets at the box office and avoid the “convenience” fees…which are considerable at Fenway.

It’s well-known to Sox fans that the Sox always have a handful of tickets available on game day, and a line usually starts forming well before game time…and well well well before game time for Yankees games.

I know several Sox fans who use this option all the time and haven’t been turned away, so if you don’t mind the wait, it’s a good way to see a high demand game. Kind of a tradition here.

 

Fenway Park tickets box office

They actually don’t even use this. It’s just there for Yankees fans.

Again, if you’re just looking to visit Fenway and you’re flexible, choose a weekday over a weekend, and try a game against a far away team that isn’t good. These are your best contests for third party seller tickets. My friends at Gametime are my favorite resource for third party tickets…they often have the best deals and ticket guarantees, which is why I made them an affiliate.

But shop around a little bit. When comparing prices through third parties, be sure to go all the way to the checkout screen and know what you’ll really be paying.

 

scalpers at Fenway Park

So to find scalpers, don’t go to Gate C.

There are plenty of scalpers around Fenway, and they are very skilled hagglers. Usually they are legit, but check the date and opponent on your ticket, and if you see anything fishy or your gut tells you something isn’t right, don’t buy the tickets. Be willing to walk away or even wait until after the game starts…both could lower the price. In the scalp-free zone, ticket holders with extras can sell them at face price or less, so try that out first. It’s usually at Gate C.

Most importantly, do NOT buy a ticket that says “OV” on it. More about that in a bit.

I say the same thing to people about buying Red Sox tickets on Craigslist…treat them like scalpers and be careful. If you’re willing to take the risk, you might find the best deal out there. (More about buying baseball tickets on Craigslist here.)

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fenway park guide best seats

Here’s where you really see the oldness of Fenway Park.

Fenway Park Guide, Part 2: Choosing The Best Seats

When choosing a seat at Fenway, the goal is to get the best seats that are within your budget…and the smaller that budget is, the more careful you have to be to avoid a seat you won’t like.

The most expensive seats at Fenway Park are mostly behind home plate…the Dugout Box and Field Box seats on the field level, and the two tiers of club seats on the mezzanine. All of these offer very good views, cushioned seats in many cases, and usually club access where the food is better. Depending on the type of ticket you get, it may include a parking pass…whether that’s worth the price is up to you.

 

fenway park guide green monster seats

Green Monster seats at Fenway…where you pay more because you can.

Green Monster seats are also among the most expensive and are difficult to come by; this is another case where you’ll need the help of your newsletter to know when they’re going on sale. Incidentally, if it’s a good view you want, avoid the Green Monster seats…they’re more for the experience than the view, which would be the worst in most ballparks. If you’re not in the first row, you’ll lose a good portion of left field in the view.

 

right field roof deck fenway

Still close enough to hear the crack of the bat (eventually)!

This is similarly the case with the right field Ultimate Deck seats…they’re very far away and the view isn’t great, so for the price the Red Sox throw in access to a bar and tables to sit at for eating or drinking. This space is popular with ballgame socializing types, so maybe you could meet a future Red Sox fan mate here, since a ballgame 500 feet away isn’t likely to be a distraction.

 

fenway park guide loge seats

Red seats = no blocked views.

If your budget isn’t quite that expansive, the Loge Box seats are very good, and cost significantly less than the Field Box seats in front of them. The only slight problem is that Rows AA-CC are “walkway advisory” seats, meaning you’ll have people walking in front of you a lot. With MLB cracking down on people finding their seats during at-bats, this is less of a problem than it used to be.

 

left field pavilion box fenway park

Not too bad without multiple levels of suites under you.

Similarly, since the mezzanine/upper deck at Fenway isn’t that high at all (support poles are your friend!) Pavilion seats offer a great bird’s eye view at a fairly affordable price compared to most seats here.

If you want to save a few bucks more on even that, you can go for Pavilion standing room, which offers a counter and a nice view, better than most standing room here. You might even be able to snag a seat if someone leaves.

 

right field box seats fenway

Be sure to sign the foul pole!

The Right Field Box and Right Field Upper Box sections are also a decent value for the buck at Fenway. They’re down the right field line past the Field Box sections, and they’re the cheapest seats that close to the field in foul territory. The seats face the outfield, so you’ll be turning your neck, but it’s not that big a deal. If you’d like to be a step above the cheap seats, these might be the best deal for you.

So now we get into cheap seats, for those of you on a budget, and we’ll start with the Grandstands.

 

visiting fenway park grandstand seating

An intimate setting where every fan is your close friend!

The Grandstand seats are behind the field level seats, and they’re covered by the upper level. They’re wooden, small, and tight with little leg room, and of course, there’s those support poles that will likely block your view of some portion of the field (more about that in a minute). That said, they’re very inexpensive by Fenway standards, and in the middle of a hot or rainy day, you’ll appreciate the cover. It can be a good deal, but you have to work for it.

 

fenway park sweet caroline

Note the complete absence of shade.

There are a lot of Bleachers seats in the outfield, and in some cases a Bleachers seat might be preferable to a Grandstand seat (for more details on that, see my seating guide for Fenway). But there’s up to 50 rows of seats in some Bleachers sections, so many seats are very far from the field, and sitting there you could have the sun directly in your eyes in the late afternoon.

There are some advantages, though; Bleachers seats are close to the bullpens, and also close to the Big Concourse if you like better food selection. If you are going for a Bleachers seat, try to get as low as you can.

 

fenway park standing room

You probably won’t catch a foul ball back here either.

Finally, the cheapest standing room tickets basically just get you into the ballpark…and you are limited to spaces behind the concourse walkways even, so you will have a very hard time finding anything resembling a decent view. Paying whatever amount you need to for an actual seat will almost always be a better alternative.

 

baseball seating fenway park obstructed views section 32

Ah, here’s the trick…just sit in FRONT of the poles!

Avoiding obstructed views: If you’re going for a Grandstand seat, there are ways to minimize the obstructed view and not have the support pole be too annoying. I go into much more detail about that on this page, but for this Fenway Park guide I’m going to keep it simple.

If you can find a ticket in the first row that doesn’t say “OV” on it, you will likely have a great view, since the pole is usually in the first row. “OV” means Obstructed View, obviously, but it has to be really bad before the Red Sox will admit to it, so avoid “OV” tickets at any cost.

 

fenway park obstructed views grandstand

The obstructed view seat is a perfect place for your bag.

Otherwise, in most sections (the right field corner excepted), if you get something between Rows 5-10, and avoid low-numbered seats if you can, you should be okay. Again, these rules don’t apply to the sections in the right field corner; honestly, take a bleacher seat over those. It’s cheaper and the view is better.

Believe me, you can get much more scientific about this, and I can’t guarantee that you won’t have ANY view problems following this advice, but use the 5-10 rule if you can’t get the first row…something in Rows 5-10 and even seats numbered 5-10, is often the best policy for avoiding poor views. Any higher rows may start losing the view of the scoreboards to the overhang.

Click here if you’d like to know more about the dreaded obstructed view and how to avoid it.

 

 
how to get to fenway park

Once you get to this point, you’re good.

Fenway Park Guide, Part 3: How To Get To Fenway Park

If you’re a Fenway newbie, I highly recommend against driving to the ballpark, for several reasons. Traffic is extremely slow closer to game time, it’s difficult to get around Kenmore Square, and parking is scarce and extraordinarily expensive. I’ll talk about what to do if you want to drive in a bit, but for your first time, take the T.

The MBTA (called the T in Boston) runs trains on their Green Line to Fenway Park; all but the “E” train stop at Kenmore station, which is a block away from the ballpark. You can park your car much more cheaply at just about any perimeter station and get to Fenway with at most one transfer.

Easy peezy, and this is how most fans get to the ballpark…so to avoid sardine-level packed trains (and I am not joking about that), leave as early as you can. Remember, use the Kenmore station, not the Fenway station on the Green Line.

 

MBTA charlie card

Yes, what they said.

One key thing, get enough value on your trip card for the way back. A crowded station is not a place to be trying to put more money on your card, and it will take a while.

If you don’t mind a bit of a walk and would prefer a less crowded train, you can use the ill-advised E line after all and get off at the Prudential station, where many Sox fans park their car cheaply to get to Fenway. It’s just under a mile walk, but it’s not bad on a nice day.

There’s also the Lansdowne station of MBTA’s Commuter Rail, on the Framingham/Worcester Line. This station is just a fly ball from Fenway, so if you can easily catch this train it’s a nice ride, and you’ll likely have a seat. The station is in the same spot as $50+ parking lots, to give you an idea of its convenience. The Back Bay station is on this line; I’ll explain the advantage of that shortly.

 

fenway park garage

Yes, they stack cars on top of each other. You’ve been warned.

OK, so you have two viable train lines to get to Fenway, but if you still want to try driving, I’ll help you as much as I can.

As you can imagine, traffic in Kenmore Square gets super slow on game day, so it’s a given that you should arrive as early as you can. Most routes to the ballpark involve Storrow Drive, so avoid that if possible. Keep in mind that if you park close to Fenway, it’s likely going to take you a fairly long time to get out, and there will be pedestrians everywhere.

 

fanway park guide expensive parking

Yes, you read that right…

For almost any parking within a block or two…and even for some lots a half mile away…you’re going to pay at least $50-60. You can, if you’re willing to walk a bit, drop that price quite a bit, and this is a great time for me to tell you about pre-paid parking.

Here is my number one, most important tip for driving to Fenway Park…Book. Your. Parking. In. Advance. I have a favorite money-saving trick for this: book your parking at the Prudential Center or at the 100 Clarendon Street lot. You can use my friends at SpotHero for great Red Sox parking, including that garage.

It’s about a 15-20 minute walk from there to Fenway (I usually walk it); but if you don’t want to do the walk, the Back Bay Commuter Rail station is right there and it’s just a couple of bucks to get to Lansdowne station. You save quite a bit of money, ride a much less crowded train, and can get off the train right at Fenway at a spot where people paid three times as much to park.

 

red sox parking prudential center

Your helpful parking landmark!

It’s also easy to find your way back, with the very tall Pru Center visible from inside the ballpark.

There are some fairly close streets where you can park for free, especially on Sundays. More about that in my detailed guide for Fenway parking.

 

fenway park bicycle valet

Keepin’ it green at Fenway.

If you’re a green sort or just like riding a bicycle in a city where even cars barely fit on the streets, the Red Sox reward you with a free bicycle valet service. The valet stop is at 73 Brookline Avenue. You also have the Bikeshare option; Bluebikes has close to ten stations very close to the ballpark. (Not sure about the bicycle availability after the game, but I presume it would be okay given the number of stations.)

 

boston pedicab fenway park

The perfect size vehicles for Boston streets.

And finally, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the Boston Pedicabs, cyclists who pedal rickshaws from numerous destinations in the city, including the aforementioned Prudential Center. You can flag one of these guys down if you’re tired after the game and it’s a fun experience riding through Boston.
 

Never Drive To Fenway Park Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
fenway park guide sausages

Outdoor dining at its best.

Fenway Park Guide, Part 4: What To Eat at Fenway

For a while, Fenway had some interesting food selections, like the Lobster Poutine Stak, but they’ve scaled them down a bit. Still, you have some perfectly good options for Fenway Park grub…especially when you include the famous sausage vendors outside.

If you’d like the much more detailed edition of the menu, check out this guide to Fenway Park food. But for this guide, I’ll just go over some classic items and some new ones.

 

fenway frank

The Monster-sized Fenway Frank, still unequaled.

The Fenway Frank (and the much larger Monster Dog edition) is still the go-to food item at Fenway; it’s a Kayem hot dog served on that famous mushy white bread. The Monster Dog is close to a footlong, so bring an appetite for that one…well worth it.

The Red Sox close off Jersey Street before and during games, making it accessible only for ticket holders. They need to feed all these people of course, so there are several worthwhile stands selling classic Fenway stuff and some unusual items.

 

El Tiante Fenway Park

For the record, no, that’s not Luis Tiant.

Most notably, El Tiante, named for Sox star Luis Tiant, is (I think) the only spot in Fenway where you can get a Cuban sandwich and Luis Tiant’s autograph (although he’s never there when I go). Jersey Street offers most of the non-hot dog food items.

In addition to Jersey Street, the Big Concourse area beyond right field also has a wider variety of food selection than most stands. You can find unusual items here, like the Bloody Mary Burger, Grillo’s Pickles, and a “Franken Bean” hot dog.

 

Fenway park guide lobster roll

This is your favorite part of this guide, isn’t it?

Lobster rolls are another classic at Fenway; they used to be made by Yankee Lobster Company but I think Sox fans may have had enough of that. The Lobster roll is cold by design, and obviously given that it’s seafood in a ballpark it’s expensive, but the fans still get them. It’s Boston after all.

There’s always pizza at Fenway Park; currently the provider is Sal’s. Sal’s has numerous locations in New England, and in 2022 they offered a free small pizza with the purchase of a large following a Red Sox victory (at their restaurants, not Fenway). I’ll keep you posted if that changes.

 

red sox food burgers

Burgers AND fries? Sold!

Burgers and steak tips sandwiches at Fenway feature beef from Savenor’s…who was once voted Best of Boston by Boston magazine, so you know it’s good quality beef. In addition to the aforementioned Bloody Mary Burger, at the new Truly Terrace behind the Bleachers, you can get a Truly Awesome Burger, with (deep breath) Savenor’s Butter Smash Burger, melted Vermont cheddar cheese, lettuce, tomato, red onion, and Thousand Island dressing on a brioche roll. (Okay, maybe that’s not that awesome, but I like the butter smash bit.)

There were a couple of new items that I definitely want to give a mention to. One solid addition in the ballpark food realm is the Mings Bings, created by Chef Ming Tsai. Mings Bings are vegan pockets with a brown rice wrapper, filled with vegan-based cheeseburger or sausage and peppers. They’re a healthy snack that you can easily carry around and eat in a ballpark, and gluten-free to boot.

There’s also Fluffernutter Fries…sweet potato fries topped with crushed peanuts, peanut sauce, and marshmallow cream. I loved Fluffernutters as a kid and cannot believe no one has ever thought of this.

If you are looking for more adventurous food selections, Jersey Street and the Big Concourse are your best destinations.

 

fenway park guide sausage

A chicken teriyaki sandwich with Inner Beauty hot sauce. Because you.

Now then, I can’t ignore the outside sausages, and neither should you. Surrounding Fenway Park on game day are numerous sausage carts that sell hot dogs, sausages, and chicken and steak tips sandwiches. Lansdowne Street is the best spot for these, being in the path from the Kenmore station.

I talk more about these different vendors in my much more detailed Fenway Park food page, but I’ll just tell you that The Sausage Connection is my favorite…they offer a good value, tasty sandwiches, and their amazing Inner Beauty hot sauce, which is a mustard-style hot sauce that goes great on any sandwich. Visit the yellow stand and tell them Kurt sent you.

 

fenway park guide peanuts

You can bring in a much smaller bag. If you’re not hungry.

You can bring food into Fenway Park, but the Sox now only allow a small bag – 5*9*2 inches as I write this, and they will search it. (Killjoys.) You should be able to pack a sandwich from an outside vendor into a bag that size, but adding a drink with it might be tough.

Finally, there is a wealth of restaurants walking distance from the ballpark at Fenway, and some of them can even be reasonably priced. There’s a lot of good grub at Fenway Park, but don’t feel like you have to get the feedbag on at the game, especially since you might have to wait a while after the game to leave anyway.

 

 
fenway park kids

Get your picture taken with a seating chart!

Fenway Park Guide, Part 5: Bringing The Kids to Fenway

If you’re planning to bring the little ones, check out Red Sox Kid Nationthe Sox offer a free game ticket with their free membership (I presume they are still doing this as of 2023, but I’ll keep checking). The paid membership is even better…it includes a backpack, a jersey and chances to get other stuff. Well worth the price. You still have to buy a ticket for you of course, but a free ticket to the most expensive ballpark in baseball is a nice thing.

As I’ve mentioned, you should be subscribed to the Red Sox newsletter, and part of that will be promotions dedicated to kids, such as Star Wars Day.

 

Fenway park kids entrance

If they lock your kids out, you can at least take a selfie.

Fenway wasn’t always much of a kid-friendly ballpark, but it’s gotten much better with entertainment and face painting and such on Jersey Street, and in the Big Concourse there is a play area called Wally’s Clubhouse open after the 3rd inning (currently closed as I write this, but the Sox will likely re-open it). Use the Gate K entrance, it’s designed for the young ones.

The kids’ area features a virtual reality batting cage, face painting, beanbag tosses and a visit from Wally the Green Monster. They can even sign a mock-up Pesky’s Pole. There is no view of the game though, so decide for yourself if you want the kids to be aware of this.

When taking kids keep in mind their restlessness; not that kids won’t enjoy the game, but it’s tight quarters and you may have an easier time in the Pavilion or Roof Box seats. Keep a close eye on them in crowded areas, and the Big Concourse and Jersey Street are less congested if they need to walk around.

 

fan information red sox

Sometimes employees will try to score some of the swag. You can’t blame them.

First-timers at Fenway get some small gifts at the Fan Information Booth—last I checked it was a sticker, a free photograph and a welcome message on the scoreboard. And a Fenway bingo card. And you’ll want a memento of your first trip here.

You can get free diapers or sunscreen at booths at Gates D and E should you need them, and the family restrooms have changing tables. The Sox have also added nursing areas at Fenway (and NO, I don’t have photos of that); they’re also in the family restrooms. They’re not sweet lounges like in Cincinnati or Washington, but they’re there.

The Red Sox designate games where kids can run the bases after the game (my kids love this). They will tell you which games on their promotions page.

 

 
visiting fenway park jersey street

This number is called “25 Or 6 To 4”!

Fenway Park Guide, Part 6: Photo-Ops + Extra Tips For Newbies

Finally, there’s a few more things you should know about your first (or next) visit to Fenway.

As of 2022, Fenway Park is cashless, so no need to bring along a wad for the inside vendors. I’m pretty certain the independent sausage stands will still take cash, though. Incidentally, MasterCard holders get occasional deals, so at least bring your MasterCard.

Keep in mind the New England weather; there’s a very good reason that April and May Red Sox games are the cheapest. Dress very warmly, especially if you will be sitting in the shaded Grandstand, and have a place to go to warm up if you need to.

Here are some of my favorite photo-ops at Fenway:

 

green monster fenway park guide

You’re pretty much right with the world in this spot.

The Green Monster. When my wife surprised me with Red Sox tickets for my birthday, my father recommended sitting in the Right Field Box seats for that solid view of the most iconic feature of Fenway. He was right.

 

Lego big papi fenway

Very well guarded as you can see.

The Big Papi Lego Statue. David Ortiz is one of the greatest heroes in Boston sports history, so of course someone took the time to build a Lego edition of him. It’s in the main concourse.

 

lego fenway park

I would love to have the set for this. With instructions of course.

The Fenway Lego Model. This is located in the concourse in the left field corner…a Fenway Park built with Legos. Can I buy the set?

 

big league brian fenway park guide

I had to hold the camera sideways.

Big League Brian. He’s the guy on stilts wandering around Jersey Street before the game, posing and playing catch with fans. Pretty easy to find him; look for the stripes on his pants.

 

fenway park photo-ops wally

Wally likes to let his guests have the spotlight.

Wally Statue. This one’s popular with the kids, Wally even sits perfectly still for your shot.

 

fenway park guide welcome

Enjoy the game!

Well, that’s a wrap. Hopefully this detailed Fenway Park guide is of some use to you…as I’ve said, it’s well worth knowing how to avoid the pitfalls, even if the difficulties are part of what makes Fenway Park great.

If you’d like to know more, I’m happy to help! Check out my much more detailed guide to getting the best deals on Red Sox tickets, this complete guide to Fenway Park seating, the complete menu of food both inside and outside of Fenway, and my very helpful Fenway parking guide. And feel free to drop me a line and let me know what you think!

Please support my sponsors and help this website help baseball fans. Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you at the yard!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Get more knowledge below from your favorite Fenway Park Expert!

 

Fenway Park Parking Guide – Best Boston Red Sox Parking

Posted by Kurt Smith

Even though I’m known for recommending that you take the T to Fenway, I’m still here to help if you want to drive and park. This Fenway Park parking guide will help you find an affordable spot, get to the ballpark easily and spare yourself a lot of headaches. You should definitely know what you’re doing, so read this carefully and commit it to memory.

And if you’re one of those folks that loves to beat the man and find free street parking at Fenway Park, this will help you with that too.

(Taking a trip to see the Red Sox? Check out my complete Fenway Park guide here!)

Here’s the breakdown of what you should know:

Driving to Fenway Park
Pre-Paid Red Sox Parking
Parking Close to Fenway
Cheaper Parking at Fenway
Free Street Parking
A Few More Fenway Park Parking Tips

 

fenway park parking guide

You can do better than this. Stick with me.

But first, an extremely valuable and applicable bit of advice from our sponsor:
 

Never Drive To Fenway Park Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
driving to Fenway park

Wally sez: “Where the H do you park around here?”

Fenway Park Parking, Part 1: Driving to Fenway Park

The closest interstate to Fenway is I-90 (Massachusetts Turnpike) running east-west north of the park; I-93 runs north-south east of the park.

The Red Sox provide directions on their website, with warnings that not only does traffic back up an hour before game time, it tends to back up at Brookline Avenue, Beacon Street and Commonwealth Avenue, Storrow Drive, and at Kenmore Square where Fenway is located. All these points are north and west.

Be sure to understand the distinction between road signs that say “Fenway Park”, as opposed to “Fenway”—the latter will take you to the actual Fenway neighborhood rather than the ballpark in Kenmore Square.

 

red sox game storrow drive

“Luke, no! It’s a trap!!”

Since all of the Red Sox directions to Fenway involve Storrow Drive, try to find a way to avoid it. You can take the Prudential exit off of the Pike, use Huntington Avenue west and turn right on Massachusetts Avenue. From there a left will bring you into Kenmore Square. Or you can just use the easy-exit Prudential Center or 100 Clarendon lots.

The hard part, actually, is after the game. Leaving the ballpark, streets that you used to get in will change direction, and if you park close to Kenmore Square you will have to contend with thousands of pedestrians. This is another reason I suggest parking further away, and if you don’t want to do the walk, read on.

 

 
fenway park parking prepaid

You want to avoid this.

Fenway Park Parking, Part 2: Pre-Paid Red Sox Parking – Yes, Do This!!

There is a fair amount of parking in the area of Fenway Park, but you might not want to pay over $50 for something that isn’t as close or isn’t as easy to get out of as you might like.

Even if you don’t care how much you pay to park…an attitude local lot owners count on, believe me…I strongly recommend that you reserve a spot beforehand. It’s difficult enough trying to find an affordable lot; doing so in Kenmore Square traffic on game day will drive you insane.

With a prepaid app like SpotHero, people can reserve spots ahead of time for a Red Sox game. Anything from large outfits like Pilgrim to people’s driveways can be included.

 

car wash red sox

I don’t know if they park your car in the middle of the car wash, but it doesn’t hurt to check.

You simply enter the date of the game, select from available spots, and your prepaid app will send you a printable reservation or a bar code on your phone for a guaranteed spot. Easy peezy. There are recommendations from people on different spots and they’ll even let you know if you can tailgate (which isn’t very common in Boston, but just saying).

Even if you are okay paying more for a closer spot, with pre-paid parking you can get something close to the highway, choose something that isn’t too exorbitant, read about who double parks or stacks cars, and choose a lot that works best for you. Plug the address into your GPS, and your day at Fenway just got a million times easier.

But definitely Book. Your. Parking. Beforehand.

 

 
red sox game parking

“Yeah, that’s mine in the back there. I’ll wait.”

Fenway Park Parking, Part 3: Parking Near The Ballpark

There are about 6,000 parking spaces within a 15-minute walk from Fenway Park. Parking is so rough at Fenway that some lots advertise “no blocking”. For a weekday game, with the area full of commuters, your chances of finding a spot decrease even more dramatically (and even the Red Sox are more emphatic that you should use the T on weekdays).

If you want to be close and don’t care about the traffic leaving, you can reserve spots in the lots on Lansdowne or Ipswich Street or Brookline Avenue for a highway robbery price.

If you’ve found someone crazy enough to drive a busload of friends to the game, bus parking is available in Lot B, near PlantPub (where Boston Beer Works used to be). For handicapped parking, the Sox list Jersey Street between Van Ness Street and Boylston Street, Ipswich Street near Gate B, and Overland Street next to Brookline Avenue. Convenient, but you will be waiting a long time to leave.

The Red Sox do a nice thing by providing a list of lots and garages on their website with prices, availability and addresses of nearby lots, but most of them don’t offer parking for under $40 on game days, even in lots that are a fair distance from the ballpark.

 

fenway park parking shell station

People will pay more for something close to the Red Sox font.

Distance from the ballpark does not always equal lower prices, by the way; in my visits I’ve seen the Shell station on Boylston charge almost twice as much as a Sunoco across the street, and I’ve also seen lots almost a half mile away from the ballpark charging $60. Don’t be intimidated if you see a high-priced lot further away.

Again, I can’t stress this enough. Book your parking in advance.

In many of the small lots (think 60 spaces or less), you could be double and triple parked, which can add to the headache of leaving after the game. Grab a bite nearby…there are plenty of spots in Fenwayville…and wait for the crowd to thin out. Or you can park at the Symphony garage on Westland Avenue to avoid this…it’s more expensive, but they valet park your car for you.

 

 
cheap fenway park parking

Hopefully this lot isn’t an hour walk away. (I’m joking, it’s not.)

Fenway Park Parking, Part 4: Cheaper Parking for Fenway Park

Here are some of the less expensive parking options for parking at Fenway and why I recommend them. They are a bit farther away, but several are close to T stations.

 

baseball parking 100 clarendon street

So secret is this spot, I’m giving you the address!

100 Clarendon Street. This one is my favorite; I’ve used this garage a few times and have always been very happy with it. The Sox’s official lot is right off of I-90 on Clarendon Street and has 2,000 spaces; it’s close to the interstate but it’s a good hike from the park, over a mile.

So long as you have your ticket stub, the lot will only charge you a third of the going rate. You can book ahead on your favorite app for a very low price by Fenway Park parking standards, and have plenty left over for an extra Fenway Frank.

If you don’t mind the walk (and I never do, it’s actually a nice walk through town), this is your affordable option with a very easy out onto I-90.

 

back bay t station

This sign is visible from the 100 Clarendon lot entrance.

If you want to avoid the walk, it’s near the Back Bay T Station, and you can use Commuter Rail to get to Lansdowne Station just steps from the ballpark IF you time your arrival right. (This might be tougher on weekends with less frequent service.)

If it’s too long a wait, it’s also not far from Copley Station, for an easy if crowded Green Line train ride to Kenmore.

Even with the train ride cost for 2-3 people, you’re still way ahead

 

parking at fenway park prudential center

It might be a buck or two more when you read this…and it’s actually probably the third best deal in town.

Prudential Center. The shops at the Pru Center have a lot that charges a bit more than Pilgrim (it’s $20 as I write this) but still much less than lots closer to Fenway; you do have to have a ticket stub. They claim to be Boston’s largest parking garage, so spot availability should be less of a problem here (and your car won’t be stacked on top of another one). Plenty of good pregame eats much cheaper than ballpark prices in the food court and in the area.

The Pru Center is also a bit of a hike (it’s in the path of the walk from 100 Clarendon but not much closer), about a mile away, but it’s very convenient to I-90 after the game. If you are too tired to do it coming back, you can take a Green Line train to Copley and transfer to an E train back to Prudential (or just walk it, it’s short), or use the Commuter Rail from Lansdowne to Back Bay.

 

red sox parking prudential center

Your easy landmark after the game.

You can see the Pru Center building inside the ballpark, beyond the right field scoreboard, so you know exactly which direction to walk in when the game’s over.

Hynes Auditorium Garage. Pilgrim Parking (50 Dalton Street) across from the Prudential Center charges a third of what most lots charge on weekends (it’s available on weekends only). This along with the Pru Center is a good spot to find Boston Pedicabs…you can read about them here.

This is a great choice for an even shorter walk; Google Maps calls it at just 13 minutes.

Symphony Garage (41 Westland Avenue). The Symphony Garage at the corner of Westland and Massachusetts Avenue is about a 15-minute walk, but it’s a bit cheaper, an easier out, and they’ll valet park your car for you so you’re not stacked behind or under other cars.

 

fenway park parking deaconness garage

Is a Deaconess a female Deacon?

Beth Israel Deaconess (330 Brookline Avenue). This lot charges about half of what most lots closer to Fenway cost, and it’s an easy straight walk up Brookline Avenue.

Longwood Medical Center (375 Longwood Avenue). The garage for the local hospital is about a quarter mile away, and is one of the cheapest lots around if you don’t mind the walk, which is about as far as the Pru Center. You can take a Green Line D to or from Longwood station to skip the walk.

Boston University (766 Commonwealth Avenue). This lot is about half the price of most Fenway lots; it’s about a 20-minute walk, but it’s also close to the BU East T station on the Green Line if you’re not quite up to the hike after the game.

Museum of Fine Arts (465 Huntington Avenue). The Museum of Fine Arts is about a ten-minute walk from the ballpark, and they offer a nice deal on weekdays…$17 as of this writing if you arrive after 5:30 PM. I have read that this isn’t in the best part of Boston, however.

 

pilgrim parking fenway park

I finally found a place to P at Fenway!

As far as parking meters, the local government has passed ordinances limiting the amount of street parking that can be had for Sox games, or at least charging a lot more for it. The new meter prices on Beacon Street, for example, aren’t quite what lots charge, but they’re no longer a steal or even worth the effort.

So that should be enough to help you find a deal and a short walk to Fenway Park. When we come back, I’ll name some spots where people have found free street parking at Fenway Park.

But first, this quick word from our sponsor:

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fenway park parking getting towed

Just so you know, Lansdowne Street next to Fenway isn’t a free spot. Not even if you have a fancy car and think you’re important.

Fenway Park Parking, Part 5: Free Street Parking at Fenway Park

Yes, you can park for free at Fenway Park; there are even some spaces that aren’t much further away than lots that go for $50. But be aware of certain things…street parking is at your own risk. If you get a ticket, the city will ensure that you wish you paid for parking elsewhere. I am not guaranteeing any of these spots; they are places I’ve found in my forum searches and visits to the ballpark.

There are still some side streets that are a bargain or even free. One more disclaimer: I wrote this in 2018, and as you can imagine this stuff changes, but hopefully I’m giving you enough to have alternatives if your wallet is light.

 

red sox parking ipswich street

Is this where I can find Ipswich clams?

Ipswich Street. Near Lansdowne Street there is a back street portion of Ipswich that is a residents-only spot, but the resident parking is enforced from 6:00 PM on, so this should be a free spot for day games. I saw several cars without permits parked there for a game. This is practically right around the corner from the ballpark, and just steps away from a lot that is $50 as I write this.

Gardner Museum. About six blocks south of the park, the Isabella Gardner Museum sits across from Simmons College. Supposedly there is some Sunday street parking on Evans Way and Avenue Louis Pasteur here. This isn’t one of the better parts of Boston though, so this might be a day game choice.

 

fenway park street parking brookline avenue

A straight walk to the ballpark!

Brookline Avenue/Chapel Street. West and south of Fenway Park there are metered spots along Brookline Avenue that become free after 6:00 PM, and a bit west is Chapel Street and the metered Longwood T lot. These are a steal if you land one, costing you only about $3-4 to feed the meter until 6:00 PM or for free on Sundays and holidays. For your efforts there are lots of eateries on Brookline to grab some takeout to bring in.

Burlington Avenue. Burlington is a side street from Brookline Avenue; there is reportedly free street parking here but you’ve got to be early. It’s a great spot if you land one though, and just a 5-minute walk.

Lansdowne MBTA Station. Just in front of the Commuter Rail station at Fenway I’ve read there is space for about a dozen cars, and there’s no parking restriction…for the moment. Just don’t block the European Car Doctors garage entrance.

Boston University/Bay State Road. There are some metered spots on Bay State Road on the Storrow Drive side near the Boston U. dorms, and on Commonwealth Avenue south of it. From Bay State it’s about a quarter mile walk. BU is buying up locations with spots, so this should be a last resort.

 

red sox parking back bay

Well, I’m kind of a resident for today…

Back Bay Side Streets. On Sundays meters are inactive on the side streets of Commonwealth Avenue, east of the ballpark in the Back Bay area. Hereford and Gloucester Streets aren’t terribly far from Fenway.

There you go…some options for beating the man and parking for free at Fenway Park. Good luck and be careful.

 

 
boston pedicab fenway park

These guys are useful…tip them well!

Fenway Park Parking, Part 6: A Few More Parking Tips

There are a lot of good reasons not to park too close to the ballpark; insane parking prices, long waits to get in and out, and Kenmore Square traffic on game day. Keep in mind that with many of the lots I’ve suggested, you can use a subway or commuter rail train to get to the ballpark and still come out ahead.

Boston Pedicabs is another viable and fun option from many spots including the Pru Center area; you get a nice ride on a rickshaw through the city and an easy exit once you do get to the car. You won’t necessarily save money, but it’s still easier on the psyche.

Meters on Jersey Street become priority spaces on game nights, so you won’t save any money there.

Ultimately, it’s usually just easier to use an MBTA subway or commuter rail train to get to a Red Sox game. But if you plan ahead, driving and parking doesn’t have to be so bad. You can save a lot of money and aggravation if you’re willing to walk just a little bit. Again, reserve a spot before the game, and get there as early as you can.

 

fenway park guide parking

Lots more where this came from!

Want to know more about the famous ballpark in Boston? Check out my complete Fenway Park guide…with everything you need to know for your next Red Sox game, including getting tickets, choosing a seat, and what to eat. Fenway Park isn’t for amateurs…be prepared!

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Yankee Stadium Guide | New York Yankees Game Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning a visit to Yankee Stadium, or if you’d like to know more about saving money and other tips, Ballpark E-Guides is here to help. This is your complete Yankee Stadium guide – covering how to get tickets, choose a seat, get to the stadium, and what to eat…and best of all, ways to save money on all of it!

If you’re serious about this and would like even more details, I can help you with that too…I’ve written this helpful guide for Yankee Stadium seating, details on the many ways to get there, a complete and very helpful primer on parking, and a long list of available food items. Oh, and of course you’ll want to save money on tickets. But this page will cover all the basics you need to know.

 

yankee stadium guide save money

One ground ball, one blooper, one flare a week…or one ticket…and you’re in Yankee Stadium.

I’ve broken this down into chapters for easy reference:

Getting Yankees Tickets
Choosing The Best Seats
Best Ways To Get To Yankee Stadium
What to Eat at Yankee Stadium
Yankee Stadium With Kids
Photo-Ops and Must-Sees

So now after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started!

Gametime has your cheap Yankees tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

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yankee stadium guide tickets

“Get your Yankees barcodes here!!”

Yankee Stadium Guide, Part 1: How To Get Yankees Tickets

I’ve listed a few tips for saving money on tickets here, but if you really want to go all out, check out my complete guide to finding cheap Yankees tickets!

The Yankees are among the toughest tickets in baseball most every year. They usually average over 35,000 a game, and are always near the tops in attendance even in lean years. Cheaper seats especially move very quickly, so plan ahead. High value games include games against the Red Sox, Mets and Phillies, Opening Day, Old Timer’s games, and weekend contests in the summer draw quite well too.

For high value games, you’re best off getting tickets early through the Yankees, via their website or the box office. The Yankees have an excellent seating map that actually gives the locations of available seats, which is terrific for getting an aisle seat or seats in front of each other. They will even let you select a price range for tickets.

The Yankees no longer accept print-at-home tickets, so when you order from the website you have to do it well enough in advance to have them mailed to you, pick them up at will call, or you can download the tickets using the MLB Ballpark app on your smartphone and scan them.

You can, of course, buy tickets at the box office and avoid the convenience fees, but I recommend against doing this on game day…there is a not insignificant price increase on game day, and lines could well be long.

For low demand games, such as midweek contests in April or May against bad teams, the Yankees offer some pretty fair deals on tickets for MasterCard holders, so get a MasterCard if you don’t have one. If you’re visiting New York for a Mets game, get a Citi MasterCard, because that will help you save money at Citi Field as well.

 

yankees tickets stubhub

StubHub briefly had an outpost at Yankee Stadium. It was promising for about ten minutes.

But for low demand games, you should definitely shop around third party sites, like StubHub and others. As you’ve seen, I have a favorite third party seller (and affiliate) in Gametime; they often have the best deals, and they have a buyer’s guarantee as well.

Remember when shopping third parties to go all the way to checkout to compare prices, and check the total price. There could be a big difference (another reason I like Gametime).

There are plenty of scalpers roaming around the Stadium; especially in Macombs Dam Park across the street or near the train station on 161st. Some of them have been known to hang out in Stan’s Sports Bar nearby. For high demand games especially, be sure of some basic things when you look at the ticket…check the date of the game and opponent. If you can wait until after the game starts, prices drop quite a bit.

I talk more about buying baseball tickets on Craigslist here, but the short version is to use the same diligence you do when scalping. There is a small chance you could get scammed.

 

cheap yankees tickets newsletter

Just in case you didn’t know the web address.

Tightwad Tips – Saving Money on Yankees Tickets

Before you pay face price for tickets through the team, take a look at specials that the Yankees offer first. Some very good bargains to be had…

Cheap Yankees Tickets, Tip #1) Use The Team Newsletter. You should subscribe to any team newsletter if you would like to see a game, but the Yankees newsletter especially is full of terrific offers.

The team offers half-price tickets, discounts for kids and seniors, and even some $5.01 (sponsored by Levi’s, get it?) tickets for low demand games. Remember the MasterCard though. Always pay attention to the newsletter before paying face price; you can definitely find some deals there.
 

cheap yankees tickets yankees universe

A key benefit of fan club membership: ushers won’t pretend they can’t see you.

Cheap Yankees Tickets, Tip #2) Yankees Universe. The Yankees have several levels of Yankees Universe fan club membership, with varying prices, but they all include tickets…often for good seats…to a game that make it well worth the cost. The MVP level membership includes those padded field level seats, and the membership price is much less than the face price of the tickets would be.

You get extra stuff with membership too, like a separate entrance to use (which you’ll appreciate, believe me), gear and bobbleheads, and deals on available premium tickets.

 

cheap yankees tickets pinstripe pass

The Yankees often celebrate the last year they sold $10 tickets.

Cheap Yankees Tickets, Tip #3) The Pinstripe Pass. If all you want is to get into the stadium and socialize, the Pinstripe Pass is for you; it’s an inexpensive ticket and includes a free drink…which at Stadium drink prices, makes the ticket almost free.

It’s a standing room ticket, but if you need a place to sit, the party decks have some barstool seating, and the ushers aren’t too strict if you manage to find a spot in the upper Grandstand.

 

 
yankee stadium seating chart

The more blue the sections in the map, the more the fans in that section care.

Yankee Stadium Guide, Part 2: Choosing The Best Seat

Where you sit at Yankee Stadium depends on your taste and budget, of course. I have gone into much more detail here about the various levels of seating at Yankee Stadium, but for this overall guide, I’ll keep it somewhat simple.

There are four tiers of seats at Yankee Stadium; the Field Level has comfortably padded seats throughout and generally go for triple digits in price. To get inside the moat for the Legends seats behind home plate, if you have to ask, you probably can’t afford it. Lots of amenities come with those, including high end grub, which is why you never see people sitting in them.

 

yankee stadium main level seats

Just slightly above the really expensive seats!

The Main Level is the tier above the Field Level; these are generally very good seats that are almost as close to the action and much cheaper. Behind home plate these are club seats, which are higher in price but include entry into one of the fancy clubs and complimentary popcorn (whoopee!).

The next tier is clubs and suites, so the Terrace Level and the Grandstand Level in the upper deck are pretty high up and Grandstand seats especially might not be for the acrophobic. Terrace seats cost significantly more than Grandstand seats but are closer to the action; again, behind home plate the Terrace Level is Club seats.

The Grandstand is probably the best value for penny pinchers. The seats are high up and you may need binoculars in the outer reaches, but there’s good deals to be had on seats here, especially for low demand games. If you are up near the top, you get to see the frieze up close and you’ll be protect from the sun, which can be really welcome in the summer.

 

bleachers yankee stadium shade

Yeah, it’s hot, that’s why no one is sitting there yet.

Finally, the Bleachers at Yankee Stadium were brought over from the old Stadium; but here they are placed behind the much more expensive Field Level seats and the bullpens. They’re the cheapest tickets other than the Pinstripe Pass, with good reason…they’re hard metal and backless and can be very hot. The right field bleachers are home of the Bleacher Creatures; they’re generally not a place for kids or people wearing opposing team’s gear.

Yankee Stadium actually has several levels of standing room…you can learn more about that here, but one piece of advice: avoid Terrace Level standing room at all costs. It’s behind the handicapped seating and offers terrible views.

In all cases, seating is most expensive behind home plate and decreases quite a bit as you get towards the outfield…and outfield seats can lose the view of the scoreboard, if that matters to you.

The sun sets on the third base side, so keep this in mind in both weather extremes; there’s much more heat in the first base side. For night games, it can get blinding in right field.

That’s the basics…again, for more detailed knowledge, check out my Yankee Stadium seating page.

 

 
best way to get to yankee stadium metro-north

Seriously, just let someone else drive.

Yankee Stadium Guide, Part 3: The Best Ways to Get To Yankee Stadium

If you’ve never been to New York City before, there’s one thing you should know: it takes real skill to drive a car here. The best way to get to Yankee Stadium in most cases is via public transit, although driving a car to the stadium isn’t as terrible as it could be. If you do choose to drive and park, here’s a much more detailed parking guide (including free street parking!), but I’ll cover that more in a bit here.

So anyway, Yankee Stadium is very well served by the MTA. Three MTA subway lines—the B, D, and 4—take riders to Yankee Stadium from Manhattan and Brooklyn. They all stop at the 161st St./Yankee Stadium Station, which is right at the main entrance of the ballpark.

All of them get the job done just fine, but I prefer the 4 for a few reasons:

 

best way to get to yankee stadium 4 train

Unlike from the B or D, you know exactly where to go from here!

1) The View. The 4 becomes elevated in the Bronx, as opposed to the B and D which remain subway trains. From the 4 platform you can see the Stadium come into view, which is as it should be.

2) Less Confusion. The B and D lines don’t always stop at the Stadium; both lines run the same route but stop at Yankee Stadium only at certain times of day.

I think I have this figured out, but I’m never sure: the B goes to Yankee Stadium during rush hour on weekdays, and the D goes there at all other times. At any time you can use one of them, but I’m never sure which one…maybe look for fans wearing jerseys and follow them.

 

yankee stadium mta

See, we’re leaving already!

3) Speed. The 4 line has more stops but is an express train most of the time, including when you will likely to be headed to the game and need it most. From Grand Central to 161st is 13 stops, but on an express train it is only five. Not so the B or D.

4) Great Pizza. Here’s a bonus tip for pizza lovers. The 4 and 6 trains share the same line (Lexington Avenue), and using the 4 after a day game allows you to hop off, and get on the 6 to Little Italy and Lombardi’s Pizza. (I’m not a one-trick pony!)

One last thing; if you’re coming an hour and a half before game time or less, any train you use will start to get packed with fans. If you can, try to hop on somewhere south of Grand Central for a better chance of landing a seat.

 

yankee stadium guide metro-north

As with the 4, it’s easy to find the Stadium from the Metro-North station.

In addition to the MTA subways, there’s also the aptly named 153rd Street/Yankee Stadium Metro-North train station just a few steps away from the stadium; this station is served by Metro-North’s Hudson, Harlem, and New Haven lines, and it’s just two stops from Grand Central Station.

Metro-North runs game day service directly to the Stadium on the Hudson Line, and there is a shuttle train that runs from both Grand Central Terminal and the Harlem 125th St. stations in midtown Manhattan, which takes just 16 minutes from midtown.

Unlike with the B-D-4 subways, you’re far more likely to find a seat with Metro-North, and a more comfortable one at that. It’s a bit more expensive than the subway, but it’s well worth it if you have the means. Tickets are cheaper when bought in advance.

One thing, don’t dilly-dally after the game, because the last post-game train leaves 45 minutes after the last out, and it does take a few minutes to walk there.

 

yankee stadium river avenue

Just saying, the people on the train above these cars are getting there faster.

OK, so do you still want to drive and park with all of these convenient trains to use? No problem, I’ve got your back.

Yankee Stadium is actually pretty easily accessible from I-87 considering its location. Obviously traffic gets worse on game days, but if you’re early enough you should have little problem getting to your spot before game time.

I use Google Maps to route me through traffic, but there are some alternate routes you can use…for brevity I’ll direct you to my Yankee Stadium parking page to see those. (I even indexed it for you!)

Did I mention booking your parking beforehand? I am NOT kidding on this one…definitely reserve your spot before you go. The Yankees have a link on their website to their garages.
 

Never Drive To Yankee Stadium Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

Yankee stadium bacon on a stick

Try not to get distracted by bacon on a stick…oh, who am I kidding.

Yankee Stadium Guide, Part 4: What To Eat and Drink

There’s quite a selection of food at Yankee Stadium, and the Yankees do introduce cool new stuff every season, but there’s also some constants that stick around. Again, much more details in this Yankee Stadium food post, but let’s briefly cover things here. First I’ll talk about some classic mainstays, then I’ll mention some new things:

 

Yankee stadium guide hot dogs

Nothing makes food look tastier than radioactive green neon!

The Yankees still offer Nathan’s hot dogs, which you can’t blame them for; they’re the only hot dogs people will willingly eat 70-something of in an hour. Incidentally, Nathan’s fries are no slouch either, so you could do worse than just a dog and fries at a Yankees game.

 

yankee stadium guide sandwiches

There’s just something about beef in NYC.

Lobel’s sandwiches are more expensive than you’d expect even for a ballpark, but they’re made with premium beef that you can actually watch being cut in front of you. The Lobel’s sandwiches are a mainstay here and one of my favorites.

 

yankee stadium garlic fries

The scouts call this one a “can’t miss” prospect.

The garlic fries are very popular here; they’re covered with parmesan cheese, oregano and drizzled with olive oil. I’ve tried these and they’re indeed awesome, but I wouldn’t get them if you’re on a date unless you’re sharing.

Here are some recent additions to the menu at Yankee Stadium:

 

kings hawaiian yankees

It’s the rolls. Chicks dig the rolls.

The Kings Hawaiian folks have brought their amazing bread to Yankee Stadium; offerings featuring this stuff include (as of 2022) a sweet and smoky chicken sandwich and a Kanak Attack burger.

 

mighty quinn's BBQ Yankee stadium

Ballparks must have BBQ, because Boog Powell.

Mighty Quinn’s BBQ has an outpost at Yankee Stadium; their brisket is smoked for 20 hours (hopefully in a row), and they offer pulled pork, chicken wings, you get it. Great for your BBQ fix at a game.

 

yankee stadium jersey mike''s

No, this Jersey Mike is not Mike Trout.

Jersey Mike’s cheesesteaks are still available at Yankee Stadium to my knowledge. I have a Jersey Mike’s near me where I live, and I am a fan…and it’s no small thing to make a standout cheesesteak in South Jersey. You should be fine with this.

I’ve asked the Yankees for permission to use the photo since I don’t have one, but they’ve added Bobby Flay’s burgers to the menu…and since he is not only a NYC chef but also a Food Network guy, I trust his stuff is probably pretty good. Especially the Nacho burger and Bacon Crunch burger.

 

hard rock cafe yankee stadium

Well worth a visit to see the signatures.

Finally, there are two restaurants attached to Yankee Stadium (not counting the clubs); there’s a Hard Rock Cafe and the ever popular NYY Steak. The Hard Rock offers typical if limited Hard Rock fare, and the NYY Steak has filet mignon, New York strip, etc. at prices that are probably lower than you’d expect for a New York City steakhouse.

You can also bring your own food into Yankee Stadium last I checked. I talk more about some options you have with that here…you can save a ton of money and get decent grub for the game this way.

There’s a few things for you to chew on, but I’m barely scratching the surface of what to eat in this Yankee Stadium guide…if you’d like a much more detailed version of what’s on the menu, check out my Yankee Stadium food guide here.

 

 
penny machine yankee stadium

Cheap souvenirs for the kids even!

Yankee Stadium Guide, Part 5: Visiting With Kids

Visiting Yankee Stadium with kids is easier than it once was; there are the aforementioned cheap Yankees tickets options and more things to do for the young ones these days. If you’re making a day of a Yankees game with the family, here are a few things you should know…

 

yankee stadium with kids clubhouse

Featuring the Yankees Shrink-a-tron, which reduces ushers to 1/10th their actual size!

Yankee Stadium With Kids, Tip #1: The Kids Clubhouse. It’s not as big and fun as some ballparks’ kids sections, but the Yankees did finally add a spot with a lot of soft surfaces and games and slides for the little ones. Kids can throw pitches, run bases, and put their faces in photos. The kids area is in right field in the upper level, and you can usually find cheap tickets for nearby sections.

In a recent visit I took my kids and this was their favorite part of the venture (they’re too young yet to appreciate a well-executed sacrifice). There’s also a nursing area in the same spot. Not a bad view of the Bronx from there, if you like looking at the Bronx.

 

yankee stadium outside gift shop

Much cheaper stuff in this and other stores; it’s a good reason to park close.

Yankee Stadium With Kids, Tip #2: Park Close And Arrive Early. Yankee Stadium is shoehorned into a very congested area, and it’s the very urban part of New York City. Trains going by are loud, and as game time approaches it gets very crowded.

It’s definitely not cheap to park close to the stadium, but if you don’t have the option of using Metro-North or the MTA, you won’t want to be too far away, especially if you’re not familiar with the area.

You can let the little ones play in Macombs Dam Park for a while to burn off some energy before the gates open, and if you use the River Avenue garage, you’ll be close to souvenir shops that are much cheaper than inside.

 

Yankee stadium guide kids

OK, so it’s not Dollywood, but give the Yankees credit for the effort.

Yankee Stadium With Kids, Tip #3: Take Advantage of Specials. The Yankees do make some tickets affordable for families. There are discounted tickets for kids on weekends, and Yankees Universe memberships for kids that include tickets and fast track entry into the Stadium. If you want to take the kids to just one game, I highly recommend looking into Universe memberships especially. It can save you quite a bit of cash.
 

 
yankees museum

I love these models. They make architectural firms very rich.

Yankee Stadium Guide, Part 6: Photo-Ops, Museums, and Other Tips

Of course you’ll enjoy the ballgame, but there are some Yankee Stadium photo ops you should take the time to visit, which is another great reason to arrive early—forgive me if they’re fairly obvious.

 

Yankee Stadium photo op monument park

Always my Pop’s favorite player, even though he hated the Yankees.

Yankee Stadium Photo Ops, #1: Monument Park. Get to Yankee Stadium early, or use a gate close to center field (I think Gate 8 is closest), and make Monument Park in center field your first stop. Monument Park is where the busts of the greatest Yankees are found, with tributes to their careers, along with pinstriped retired numbers. The big bust of Boss George Steinbrenner was added overlooking all of them, which I think is kind of comical.

Again, get here early though, because it fills with visitors very quickly, and the line may be so long that you might not make it in before it closes 45 minutes before game time.

 

Yankee stadium photo ops yankees museum

Mickey Mantle said you could smell liquor on Don Larsen’s breath that day.

Yankee Stadium Photo Ops, #2: The Yankees Museum. The excellent Yankees Museum is located near Gate 6, up a ramp to the Main Level. It features artifacts all through the team’s great history, dedicating them by the stars or each era, e.g. “The Derek Jeter Era” of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

You’ll see a very old flyer advertising “See Babe Ruth In Action”, World Series trophies through the years, Thurman Munson’s locker, and a long glass casing of baseballs signed by Yankees from all eras. In the center of the room are two statues, depicting Don Larsen throwing the final pitch of his World Series perfect game to Yogi Berra. Well worth a visit for any fan of baseball history.

The Yankees Museum is open throughout the game, so you can visit it if the climate is too rough or the Yankees aren’t having a great day. The game is broadcast in the room. No flash photography.

 

yankee stadium photo ops great hall

Photos several times larger than the people looking on.

Yankee Stadium Photo Ops, #3: The Great Hall. As if Monument Park and the Yankees Museum wasn’t enough, the Great Hall serves as another reminder of all of the players you either loved or hated depending on your world view.

The Great Hall is where two of the main entrances to the Stadium are, so it gets crowded before the game, but it is spacious enough to accommodate a typical Yankee Stadium crowd. You can look around and see larger than life photos of Billy Martin, Goose Gossage, Reggie Jackson and many other Yankee greats.

The Great Hall is actually best viewed from above, in front of the entrance to NYY Steak, which is where the above photo was shot. You can overlook and people watch from this vantage point, without anyone bumping into you.

 

Anything else you need to know? No? Well great…I hope that this Yankee Stadium guide has been a great help to you in planning your next game. I have added much more detailed posts below if you’re interested in finding out more.

Thanks for reading. Be sure to drop me a line and let me know if you enjoyed it, and please support Ballpark E-Guides sponsors!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

 

Ultimate Yankee Stadium Parking Guide: Cheap, Pre-Paid + Free Parking.

Posted by Kurt Smith

Driving and parking at Yankee Stadium isn’t usually the best option (read my much more detailed post about that here, or my basic Stadium tips here), but I understand why you might not prefer to ride on a crowded train. So just for you, I have put together this extensive guide to Yankee Stadium parking.

 

macombs dam bridge

Don’t get to this point without having read this post.

I’ve included alternate driving routes, easy outs toward your destination, and advantages and disadvantages of each spot, including proximity to bring your own sandwich shops!

Whether you’re a first time visitor or a regular, there’s valuable information here for you to help you save money and make your life easier. Here’s a table of contents for you so you can skip anything that doesn’t apply:

Alternate Driving Routes to Yankee Stadium
Official Yankees Game Parking, You Know, From The Yankees
Yankee Stadium Satellite Parking Lots (Including Cheaper Ones)
Prepaid Yankee Stadium Parking!
Free Street Parking at Yankee Stadium
Yankee Stadium Tailgating
Handicapped Parking at Yankee Stadium

(If you need more Yankee Stadium help, I’ve got the info on how to choose a great seat, the extensive Stadium food menu, and how to save money on Yankees tickets!)

Gametime has your cheap Yankees tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

 
alternate route yankee stadium

Yes, Geo is short for George. In fact that was his little known nickname.

Alternate Driving Routes to Yankee Stadium

Most routes to Yankee Stadium use I-87, also called the Major Deegan Expressway. Needless to say, traffic gets heavy on game days. You can also approach the Stadium from I-95, aka the Cross Bronx Expressway. The Yankees have gotten lazy with directions and now they just send you to Google Maps to figure it out.

If you arrive early enough (as in at least two hours early) traffic and parking isn’t bad at all, but after the game it can be rough exiting if you don’t pick the ideal spot.

If you don’t have Google Maps handy for any reason, here’s some alternate routes:

 

macombs-dam-bridge

Note the absence of heavy ballgame traffic!

Alternate Route #1: If you’re coming via the George Washington Bridge (from NJ) and want to avoid the Deegan traffic, try using the Jerome Avenue exit from I-95, or taking the Harlem River Drive south in Manhattan and using the Macombs Dam Bridge.

Alternate Route #2: You can also try using a different entrance into Manhattan from NJ (like the Lincoln or Holland Tunnels) and using the Henry Hudson Parkway on the West Side.

Similarly, coming back you can use the Macombs Dam Bridge back into Manhattan. This route avoids much of I-87 and its congestion.

 

deegan expressway yankee stadium

Yes, it’s actually spelled “Triborough”. Do you know how much funding it takes to add “ugh” on a road sign?

Alternate Route #3: After the game, if you’re heading south on I-87, try using the Grand Concourse south and meeting up with I-87 near the Triborough Bridge. Good for getting to Queens or Brooklyn. Parking a few blocks south makes exiting very easy if you drive south away from the ballpark.

Alternate Route #4: If you’re heading north after the game, you can use the Grand Concourse rather than the Deegan to get to I-95, or use it to the Moshulu Parkway to get to I-87 north. Might be a little easier with post-game traffic.

 

 
yankee stadium parking map

Well this is really helpful AFTER you’ve parked…

Official Yankees Game Parking, You Know, From The Yankees

The Yankees do have a fairly helpful parking map, check out a bigger version here.

Most parking lots near the Stadium charge a stiff fee for parking during the regular season and even more for playoffs–and not even New Yorkers pay it, so there’s usually spaces available.

That said, you can (and should) book Yankees’ lots beforehand on the Quik Park Garages website, especially since some lots don’t accept cash, but it isn’t any cheaper that way. Even official Yankees lots can be a bit of a hike, so look at the map and choose one ahead of time.

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yankee stadium parking river avenue garage

Hmmm, tough call, but I think I’ll exit to Yankee Stadium.

If you’re using a Yankees lot, the River Avenue garage is the most expensive but also the most convenient; it’s right across the street and very close to cool souvenir shops and some eateries. It’s a couple bucks extra, but it’s worth it for the convenience especially for families.

The Gerard Avenue Lot is also nearby and may cost a tad less, but it’s not as close to the bring your own eateries on 161st.

The 164th Street Garage is also right there on the north side of the Stadium, and it’s closer to less congested gates like Gate 2 where you can get into the Stadium away from the B-D-4 crowd.

 

Ruppert Garage Yankee Stadium

Thanks for the advice about parking my own car, but I wasn’t planning on parking someone else’s anyway.

The East 161st Street Garage and Ruppert Plaza Garages are nice and convenient; they’re close to the Stadium, somewhat separated from the hustle and bustle at the train station, and allow for a quick and easy exit over the Macombs Dam Bridge or onto the Major Deegan.

The Harlem River area lots are a few bucks cheaper and an easier out onto the Deegan, and there should be plenty of people heading towards the Metro-North station nearby so you’ll feel safe. It’s a few extra minutes’ walk, but that helps traffic clear out.

 

yankee stadium parking metro north station

Yes, Babe Ruth played on that field. The lighting wasn’t as good then.

The 153rd Street Garage and Lot are both across Heritage Park field, close to the Metro-North station, so it’s an easy and safe walk (past lots of scalpers, incidentally). Once you’re this far away, though, you can probably book a cheaper garage …stay tuned.

If the 151st Street North and 151st Street South lots are all that’s available from the Yankees, look for something better. Remember Yankee Stadium is on 161st…so these lots are ten blocks away, further than you’ll likely want to walk, at least for the price.

One thing to remember though…AAA will provide free roadside service if you’re broke down in one of the Yankees’ lots. Should you have such trouble, head to Gate 6 or Gate 2 and find a Guest Services Booth.

Now, onto parking lots not operated by the Yankees…but first, a valuable and applicable bit of advice from our sponsor, SpotHero!

Never Drive To Yankee Stadium Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
yankee stadium parking lots

A makeshift sign on a vine-covered fence? What’s not to trust?

Yankee Stadium Satellite Parking Lots

There are ample and somewhat cheaper satellite parking lots at Yankee Stadium. Most satellite lots are safe and can be half the price of closer Yankees lots, but it is still the Bronx, and you may be a little uneasy walking too far at night. You can book most of these ahead of time with SpotHero (and I highly recommend doing so).

Here are a couple of my favorites…

 

yankee stadium parking bronx terminal market

A Yankees game with a day at Chuck E. Cheese just might make my life complete.

The Bronx Terminal garage is about a half mile south and about half the cost of Yankees lots; for day games you probably won’t mind the walk. Again, it could make you wary at night, but there should be plenty of people heading towards nearby lots. The Bronx Terminal Market has some cool eateries and shops, but it can be a slow exit if the market is still open.

MPG Parking operates several Yankee Stadium parking garages…there’s one at 810 River Avenue, which is nice and convenient, just a block or so away, and last I checked you could book this on a parking app for cheaper than some further official Yankees lots.

There is a lot as 86 East 158th garage next door, about which I’ve read this: “Drivers like this being one of the closest available lots but also note the inevitable congestion before and after the game.” Probably true for 810 River Avenue as well. BUT! These two garages are right there at Stan’s Sports Bar, a favorite of Yankees fans. Please don’t drink and drive, at least not in that order.

 

river avenue parking yankee stadium

They could charge more for parking if they moved the trash bags and let people drive in.

North of the Stadium a few blocks on River Avenue, parking gets cheaper, and since it’s under the 4 train tracks it’s easy to find your way to the Stadium and back.

If you’re uncomfortable walking it at night, you can choose an inexpensive spot near the 167th Street Station and take a train (B, D, and 4 all work) one stop back. The 1185 River Avenue Garage from Park Right is a good spot for this, and it’s an easy exit onto I-95 (aka the Cross Bronx Expressway, for you city slickers).

Concourse Village Parking

You could take advantage of the half hour special, if you just took some pictures of the Stadium and left. (Photo courtesy of ParkWhiz.)

East of the ballpark past the Grand Concourse are also some cheaper lots, but I wouldn’t use these unless you’re familiar with the area and it’s an easier out for you. It’s much easier to get lost there both on foot and driving, and it’s a further walk than you would think. But if you think you can handle it, try 771 Concourse Village West…it’s cheap and not terribly far.

You could drive into Manhattan and find a cheaper place to park and get on the 4 train, which might be advantageous depending on your starting point. It will probably be cheaper and not far from a train that can get you there.

 

 
Yankees parking

Pro tip! Tell them you’re here for a “general event”!

Prepaid Yankee Stadium Parking!

If you’re driving to Yankee Stadium, your life will be a lot (pun intended) easier if you book your spot ahead of time.

In case I haven’t made it clear yet in this post, Yankee Stadium parking is best planned ahead. You definitely do not want to just grab the first spot you find, and possibly pay more for something that isn’t as close or isn’t as easy to get out of as you might like.

With a pre-paid app like SpotHero (my favorite for their selection and helpful information), you can enter the date of the game, select from plenty of available spots, and the app will send you a printable reservation for a guaranteed spot…or a bar code you can put on your phone using their excellent app. Many of the garages are covered, attended and have valet service, and they’ll even let you know if you can tailgate. (Assume probably not though.)

 

 
free parking yankee stadium

If you’re looking for free double parking at Yankee Stadium, you’re really pushing it.

Free Street Parking at Yankee Stadium

So you want to park for free on the street at Yankee Stadium? I love the way you think my friend.

The area around Yankee Stadium is residential, and there are cars parked along nearby streets in nearly every direction, so if you’re able to get there very early, (and if you’re a parallel parking machine like me), you might be able to find something, especially in more residential areas east of the ballpark.

You will see cars parked on Jerome Avenue, Gerard Avenue and Walton Avenue, and the side streets off of 161st Street and the Grand Concourse. I actually saw several spaces on the Grand Concourse and didn’t see any restrictions there, and that allows for filling up your goody bag on 161st too.

I’ve also read that east of the Major Deegan Expressway, there are free street spots near the police precinct (which would probably be as safe as any spot).

 

grand concourse bronx street parking

I found a spot for you, grab it now though.

I don’t know if anyone’s been ticketed for this (one gentleman parking on Jerome Avenue told me he does it all the time), but as always, street parking is at your own risk. Sunday would be the best day to try it…there doesn’t seem to be any restrictions according to the signs, but you’d need to get there early to snag one. They fill up fast.

 
gerard avenue lot

Wouldn’t it be easier to list what you CAN do in this lot?

Yankee Stadium Tailgating

I’ve seen tailgating in a lot northeast of the Stadium, but not anywhere else. Honestly, while some people partake, there isn’t much of a tailgating scene. Miller Park, or even Citi Field, it’s not.

The Quik Park people say tailgating is allowed, but with no alcohol or open flames, which is kind of counterintuitive. Nor are you allowed to save spots…this is NYC and parking is always at a premium.

Your best deal is to park in a lot or garage near the train station, grab a sandwich and drinks at one of the delis on 161st, and grub tough on that.

I’ve also read in some forums that the NYPD is generally lenient on drinking in plastic cups at most lots, so long as you don’t cause any trouble. But basically it’s just not a tailgating kind of place. Most people do their pre-game partying at Stan’s, The Yankee Tavern, Billy’s Sports Bar, or one of the other nearby taverns here.

 

 
Yankee Stadium Handicapped parking

Gate 8 makes an excellent dropoff point, offering a full 35 seconds before you get towed.

Handicapped Parking at Yankee Stadium

The Yankees don’t say much about handicapped parking on their website, even in their Guests with Disabilities Guide. But they do have handicapped spaces in their garages, and I would highly recommend using the River Avenue Garage for the shortest trek to the Stadium, especially with the crowds that come out of the place.

Here’s another thing you should probably know…handicapped tags from other states aren’t valid in New York City, so if you’re outside of NY, try getting in touch with the Yankees Disabled Services at (718) 579-4510 and ask what they can do for you.

The Yankees also suggest dropping off guests with disabilities, so ask them about that too. It could save you a few bucks on parking.

There you are my friends…you should never have a problem finding your ideal Yankee Stadium parking spot again.

I’m here to help…so if you need more great and money-saving Yankee Stadium tips, be sure to check out this complete guide to Yankee Stadium! (And thanks for supporting my sponsors and this website!)

Note: this post contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, the website owner earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!

 

Wrigley Field Guide | Best Chicago Cubs Game Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

Here it is my friend…your completely useful, completely informative, and completely entertaining Wrigley Field guide – with all the info you need for your next Cubs game (or any other event) at the Friendly Confines!

I’ve written other helpful stuff about Wrigley, from the impressive Wrigley Field food menu, the best ways to get to a Cubs game, to this helpful guide to Wrigley Field parking, and a detailed guide to Wrigley Field seating. And if you’re serious about saving money on tickets, this post is for you.

But this Wrigley Field guide covers all of the most important stuff. With lots of nice pictures. Please support our sponsors using the links below.

I’ve broken this down into chunks for you…

Finding Cheap Cubs Tickets
Choosing A Seat At Wrigley Field
The Best And Other Ways To Get To Wrigley Field
Wrigley Field Food
Bringing The Kids
Other Stuff

Gametime has your cheap Cubs tickets…with a lowest price guarantee, panoramic seat view photos, and great last minute deals…even after the game starts!

gametime affiliate program mlb tickets(See why Ballpark E-Guides loves Gametime here!)

 
welcome to wrigley field guide sign

Did you bring your Cubs parka?

Wrigley Field Guide, Part 1: Cheap Cubs Tickets

Cheap Cubs tickets is something of a relative phrase. But that’s all the more reason to read this useful Wrigley Field guide.

You can, with some effort, save a lot of a money on Cubs tickets…by being aware of all of your ticket buying avenues, choosing the right contest, and paying attention to things like the Cubs ticket alert newsletter. (If you haven’t already, subscribe to that now.) I will be putting together a full primer about finding cheap Cubs tickets soon, but here’s some basic help.

I’ll start with how the newsletter can help you. For high demand games, you are best off planning ahead and paying face value for tickets if you can. Your newsletter will (for free!) inform you of when tickets go on sale, including pre-sales. This is an opportunity to get tickets for high demand games at face price, which will likely be the cheapest price.

If you live in Chicago or know someone who does, get your tickets at the box office and avoid the considerable online fees.

 

 
wrigley field guide cubs tickets

OK, so I haven’t been to Wrigley since Anthony Rizzo was a Cub! Does that make me a bad person??? (Don’t answer that.)

High demand games are July and August weekend games, and games against the White Sox, Cardinals or Yankees. The easiest games are April weeknights, and when your behind is stuck to your frozen seat you’ll know why.

So if you want cheap Cubs tickets, and you have a choice, choose a weekday game over a weekend, and try for something in May (or September if the Cubs aren’t contending). If a weekend is your only choice, try for a Friday or Sunday.

You’ll need the MLB Ballpark app if you don’t get your tickets in person. The Cubs don’t allow printed tickets, because of their concern about fraud (whatever). You need the app anyway, for this reason: If you go the third party route, StubHub isn’t a bad choice, but search around, because other agencies might be offering better deals.

I always include Gametime in my searches. (And they are also an affiliate.)

Gametime, like StubHub, shows you available tickets from online sellers, and you can list them by price, and even choose from elite sellers. For low demand games especially, you can often find tickets for significantly less than face price, so check with Gametime first.

 

wrigley field guide ticket agencies

Gazebo + Bike Racks = Legit!

If you decide to try the many agencies near the ballpark, take a seating diagram with you so you can see where your potential seats are. They are very skilled hagglers, these guys…as are the scalpers…so wait until close to game time to get a better deal.

There are lots of scalpers here, but honestly, unless you have sick haggling skills like my buddy Andrew Van Cleve (who once lived near Wrigley Field), I would choose another route.

Here’s a key tip: Most of the agencies near Wrigley have their own websites, so if you’re using StubHub in your search for tickets, try comparing the price of your ticket to an equivalent ticket on the agency website. I’ve read that some agencies will list their tickets on both outlets, but it will be cheaper on their own site, and you should be able to pick up the tickets at the game.

And one last killer tip: bleacher seats during the season are general admission, so if you need more than one, try searching for some combination of the total you need for a better deal…e.g. if you need five, try searching for three singles and a pair. You might save quite a few bucks this way.

Don’t wait till you get to the ballpark to get your Chicago Cubs gear…
Order your caps, jerseys, and more now at MLBShop.com and save!

Click here to order your Cubs gear today!

wrigley field guide choosing a seat at wrigley

I guess it kinda doesn’t matter when you’re at Wrigley. But we’ll discuss anyway.

Wrigley Field Guide, Part 2: Choosing The Best Seat

If you really want the nuts and bolts of how to choose a great seat at Wrigley (and it’s worth the trouble, especially if you’re a first timer), check out my extremely detailed Wrigley Field Seating guide.

But for the purposes of this simpler Wrigley Field guide, I’ll break it down by budget:

Friends of The Ricketts Budget: If money isn’t an issue, the Cubs have added a bunch of high end seats as part of the recent renovation; these include most of the closer seats between the dugouts. The visitors’ dugout is on the first base side, if you’re seeing your team at Wrigley.

These seats include all kinds of amenities like access to the swanky new clubs, so if you can afford a ticket at this price, you don’t need me to help you save money at Wrigley.

Large Budget: If you have triple digits to drop on Cubs pasteboards, the Bullpen Box, Club Box and Field Box seats are the closer lower level seats, and for low demand games you can find much better prices. Seats in the infield cost significantly more, as they do on the upper level, so if you’d rather be low than behind home plate, go for the outer Club or Field Box seats.

Avoid the first few rows of Field Box seats; there’s a walkway between Club and Field Box sections, and the foot traffic can be annoying.

 

bartman seat

This is the view from the Bartman seat. Do you think you wouldn’t have gone for the foul ball?

If you’re looking for the Steve Bartman seat, go to Section 3 and ask an usher…they can always point you right to it. (Wikipedia is no help with this.)

Medium Budget: For the folks who still prefer a craft beer to wine and cheese, the Terrace and Upper Box seats are within your range. Both have their advantages, but they’re very different. Choose the Upper Box for April or September games; the Terrace sections are almost entirely covered and get little sun, and that matters here.

As I’ve said, Upper Box seats are a great value, even at the current price; the upper deck at Wrigley is as close to the action as at any ballpark.

Small Budget: If you’re going for cheap seats at Wrigley Field, you can start with the Upper Reserved sections, especially the ones in the outfield; but a small step above them in price are both the Bleachers and the Terrace Reserved seats, both of which are much better.

If you do go with the upper level, be aware that there are only nine rows, so if you get Row 9 you will be at the very top of Wrigley Field. This isn’t such a bad thing, but if you struggle with steep steps you won’t like it. Stick with Terrace Reserved if that’s a problem for you.

 

upper level shade wrigley

Shade. It matters here.

With Upper and Terrace Reserved seats, you will very likely be covered by a roof. Being in the shade in Chicago can get chilly at any time; I’ve shivered there in late June. Just be prepared; put on an extra layer of clothing or two, or sit in the uncovered bleachers.

I talk more about the Wrigley Field bleachers here; but remember a few simple things: bleachers are general admission, so get there very early (I’m talking three hours before the gates open for high demand games). The seats are also metal and backless; bring a cushion if you’ve got a sensitive behind.

The bleachers feature seriously dedicated Cubs fans, some of whom probably drink more than they should. It might not be the best place for kids or fans wearing opposing teams gear. If you catch a visiting home run ball, throw it back. It’s not worth what you might endure if you don’t.

 

wrigley field support poles

Here’s the trick…just get the seat next to the support pole!

Avoiding Obstructed Views: With Terrace and Upper Reserved, you also have obstructed views from support poles. I’ve written more about that here; but if you want to keep it simple, avoid low numbered seats and low numbered rows in Upper Reserved; in the Terrace try to stay between rows 10-15. (Or get the “Preferred” seats with little to no obstruction; worth a couple of extra bucks.)

One last bit about seating: the sun sets on the third base side, so the shade comes early there. For chillier evenings, the right field seats that aren’t under a roof will be warmer. Again, this is Chicago, and you should be mindful of this.

The bleachers aren’t covered at all, and the Cubs offer sunscreen dispensers there.

 

wrigley field guide getting there

We’re here! Okay, where do we park?

How To Get To Wrigley Field

I’ll cover the basics of getting to the Friendly Confines here, but I cover this topic in much more detail in this post, well worth a read!

Most Wrigley goers, including the esteemed author of this respectable Wrigley Field guide, will tell you that the easiest way to get to Wrigley Field is by using the CTA Red Line. It’s cheap, it drops you right at the ballpark at Addison station, it runs 24/7, and there’s even a bunch of places to fill up your goody bag (yes, you can bring food into Wrigley Field).

If you use the Red Line, here’s a couple of tips: stand on the ends of the platform where the cars are less crowded; and try the station before Addison after the game if you want a seat (e.g. use the Sheridan station if you’re heading towards downtown).

In addition to the Red Line, the CTA has several other rail routes you can use to avoid standing on a packed train.

 

best way to get to Wrigley field blue line

Not the same Addison station where Wrigley is. Don’t walk it from here.

You can use the Blue Line to the Addison Station (it’s not the same station as the Red Line Addison, by the way) and the #152 bus, which also drops you at the ballpark, or use the Brown Line…which takes you a couple of blocks from the ballpark at the Belmont station, on a much less crowded train. Much more pleasant ride, this, through some attractive parts of Chicago…I’ve used it and thought it was preferable to the Red Line given the choice. The Brown Line doesn’t run 24/7 however, so check the schedule.

Metra Rail can take you from most of the suburbs of Chicago to downtown, but you’ll still probably be using the Red Line to get to Wrigley.

If trains aren’t your thing, you have a few alternatives, some of which are equally inexpensive and almost as convenient.

 

wrigley field parking express bus

No, you can’t leave your car there for the weekend.

First, you should know about the free Wrigley Field bus that the Cubs run for night and weekend games, from the remote lot at 3900 North Rockwell Street as of this writing (check the Cubs website on this, it moves from time to time). Free parking and free bus? U can’t touch that. Remember though, free attracts a lot of people, and this bus is always crowded.

 

how to save money at the ballpark wrigley express

Definitely beats the Wrigley parking price.

Then there’s the Pace Wrigley Field Express, another public transit route to Wrigley. The Pace buses run from two locations in the suburbs, and drop you right at the ballpark…and much more cheaply than paying for gas, tolls and parking. I’ve used the Pace Express to get to a White Sox game and it was great…just a few bucks and free parking, and lots of fans to talk baseball with.

Note: As I write this, Pace doesn’t have the staff to run the Wrigley Field Express, but they’re working on it and I’m sure it will return at some point.

Finally, if you do decide to drive and park, you can either use the aforementioned free remote lot, or use the lots near the ballpark, some of which are owned by the Cubs.

Remember though, driving and parking is more challenging. If you are driving to Wrigley Field, I very strongly recommend that you book a spot beforehand.

 

wrigley field parking green lot

It may be hard work to guard this sign, but someone’s got to do it.

You can also read my much more detailed guide for Wrigley Field parking, including traffic tips, other ways to park for free, and a bit about the very cool Reggies Rock Bus.

Wrigley is a popular Uber destination, and Lyft has Wrigley listed in its “discount zones”. A shared ride from Wrigley after the game can still be expensive though; you may want to walk a couple of blocks away from the crowded streets of Wrigleyville first.

And finally, as you know, this Wrigley Field guide goes the extra mile…if you want to avoid all this and ride a bicycle to Wrigley, there’s actually a free bicycle valet near the Addison CTA station, and the Cubs will look after your bike free of charge. There’s also Chicago’s Divvy Bikeshare shared bicycle service; they have two stations very close to Wrigley.

You’re now a expert on how to get to Wrigley Field, and that’s no small thing.

Never Drive To Wrigley Field Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
wrigley field guide hot dogs

I should really leave this to professionals.

Wrigley Field Food: A Taste of Chicago

The Cubs have definitely stepped up the Wrigley Field food game; the link you just passed is a much more detailed primer on all things food at Wrigley these days (and it’s kind of funny too).

Chicago as a city worships three of the best American foodstuffs: hot dogs, pizza, and beefy sandwiches. At Wrigley, all three are represented pretty well.

Let’s start with hot dogs. You have ample choices for encased meat at Wrigley; my favorite is the Chicago Dogs stand…a simple but hefty dog that you can adorn with the Chicago dog necessities: chopped tomatoes, sport peppers, mustard, sauerkraut and neon green relish. And grilled onions, for an extra touch.

But if you’re in the bleachers…and this is a very good reason to be…you have the option of Hot Doug’s, a former Chicago-based stand that sells dogs with unusual toppings and named after Cubs greats, like the “Champ Summers”: a spicy Polish sausage with Goose Island beer mustard and crispy fried onions. They rotate the dog types for every homestand; Hot Doug’s is very popular.