Free Shuttles to American Family Field | Milwaukee Brewers

Ballpark Parking


Free Shuttles to American Family Field | Milwaukee Brewers

Posted by Kurt Smith

Milwaukee is a town full of crazed Brewers fans, and every game day is a celebration. In addition to the insane tailgating, dozens of taverns and bars offer free shuttle service to American Family Field for Brewers games. (Call it Miller Park if you want, but it’s an insurance place now.)

A Brewers shuttle offers multiple advantages. Baseball fans can park for free, enjoy great food offerings or drinks without paying ballpark prices, and avoid sitting in post-game traffic. If you’re staying at a hotel or near a bar with a shuttle, it’s a great way to avoid drinking and driving afterwards too.

So as a public service, I’ve compiled this complete list of establishments that will give you a ride to the Brewers game, or any major events at the retractable roof wonder. I’ve included some info about each one. Here is also a helpful map with their locations, so you can make a decision based on where you want to be.

Here’s the breakdown:

Blue Mound Road + Nearby Establishments
Downtown Milwaukee
West Milwaukee + West Allis
Wauwatosa + West Wauwatosa
From A Bit Farther Away
Hotel Shuttles

So after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started:

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free shuttle to american family field kelly's bleachers

Don’t worry, they’ll find someone to drive too.

American Family Field Shuttles: Blue Mound Road + Nearby

Blue Mound Road is almost walking distance to American Family Field, so these joints are not far from the ballpark. There is usually free street parking near these places, and some of them have their own lots.

Balistreri’s Bluemound Inn (6501 West Blue Mound Road). Balistreri’s is an Italian lunch and dinner restaurant; they were once voted “Best Late Night Food” by Milwaukee Magazine. They have Friday fish frys and highly rated pizza. They don’t say anything about their shuttle on their website, but they’re on everyone’s list and they do have a large private parking lot.

Brewski’s Sports Pub (304 North 76th Street). Brewski’s, according to their Facebook page, offers craft beer, cocktails, and a dog-friendly patio. I doubt you can leave your dog there when you go to the game though. It’s basically a sports bar with a menu featuring nachos, totchos, Buffalo chicken wontons, wings, etc. They also have fish frys on Fridays. Their shuttles run starting two hours before game time, and they sometimes offer drink specials for shuttle users.

Dugout 54 (5328 West Blue Mound Road). Dugout 54 was formerly Derry Hegarty’s, and you can still see the name in signage at the place. The Dugout has all of 32 beer tap lines with multiple craft beers, but they also offer table seating for families. The menu includes burgers and sandwiches, wings with numerous sauces, and a “pretty sizeable pretzel”. Incidentally these are the same folks who run Kelly’s Bleachers…more on Kelly’s in a minute.

 

Milwaukee brewers shuttles J&B blue ribbon

Are you welcoming me or Jagermeister? (Both!)

J&B’s Sports Bar & Blue Ribbon Taproom (5230 West Blue Mound Road). J&B’s Blue Ribbon took over the popular Long Wong’s tavern, and they’ve done a fine job remodeling, including billiards tables and a taproom. They call themselves the home of Milwaukee’s best chicken strips, in case your kids like that sort of thing. They also have pizza, wings, burgers, and of course, Friday Fish Frys.

Kelly’s Bleachers (5218 West Blue Mound Road). Kelly’s Bleachers has all sorts of fun stuff going on…music bingo, beer pong tournament Fridays, and most importantly, Happy Hour discounts. Their menu’s signature items are the Reuben rolls, the “Best Tater Tots Ever” (like anyone can even know that), and a Western burger. They serve a limited menu to meet the demand on game day, but I’m sure they have the good stuff.

Kelly’s website, for some reason, is really awful…it looks like it hasn’t been updated since the early days of the Internet. Don’t let that sway you though, they’re cool folks.

Magoo’s on the Mound (5841 West Blue Mound Road). Magoo’s features burgers, bar appetizers like the famous Wisconsin cheese curds, a “Bavarian Beast” soft pretzel, and that Friday fish fry of course. The beer on tap selection is decent, and their special include Taco Tuesdays and Burger Thursdays. Pool, darts, bags, lots to do.

Yes, it’s named after that Mr. Magoo from the cartoons, and you’re dating yourself if you recognize him. Magoo’s was formerly Steve’s on Bluemound, in case anyone recommends Steve’s to you.

McGinn’s (5901 West Blue Mound Road). McGinn’s calls itself an “All-Star Sports Bar”. Their nightly specials include Thursday wing night and a Steak Special on Wednesdays. McGinn’s Happy Hours include $3 domestic tap and domestic bottles (at least that’s what their Facebook header says, but it is 2024), which is a pretty good deal. I presume that includes game nights. They also have Sunday brunches, great for day games.

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milwaukee steak house american family field shuttle

Perhaps the chef got tired of pronouncing “Coerpers”.

Milwaukee Steakhouse (6024 West Blue Mound Road). The Milwaukee Steakhouse doesn’t mess around with their steaks. As they say, they only offer the best cuts of USDA Choice Black Angus Beef (their capitalization, not mine). Get your steak with garlic, peppercorn, fried onions, or even bearnaise style. They also have signature martinis. Needless to say, this is fine dining, so I wouldn’t expect pub fare here.

O’Brien’s Irish American Pub (4928 West Vliet Street). O’Brien’s actually has their own hydroponic garden, so they can grow their own fresh ingredients. Now that’s thinking of your customers. The menu (with fresh ingredients!) features wings, nachos, wraps, sandwiches, pizza and much more. And of course, they have lots of beers on tap and two Brewers shuttles. O’Brien’s even features a “birthday club”, with perks well worth signing up for.

Rounding Third (6317 West Blue Mound Road). Rounding Third offers up wings in a variety of flavors (I’ve tried the Jamaican Jerk dry rub wings and they’re very good). They also have a Milwaukee cheesesteak, half pound Angus burgers, stone fired pizza, and of course that Friday fish fry. Rounding Third’s prices seem a tad lower than most joints, and they have beer specials, although their beer selection isn’t as varied as others.

 

saz's state house restaurant milwaukee brewers shuttle

Is it me or does the Saz’s building look like a surprised face?

Saz’s State House Restaurant (5539 West State Street). Saz’s bills itself as a first rate restaurant and sports bar, and their menu reflects that…fancy apps like low country shrimp, onion straw baskets, and candied bacon. More importantly, this is a BBQ spot, with ribs, walleye, chicken and waffles, and (wait for it) cornbread chicken pot pie. Not done yet…fancy burgers too, and a gluten free menu. A bit pricier than other joints, but undoubtedly worth it.

They even provide some extra information about their Brewers shuttle. Drink specials on game days. Love that.

Spitfires on State (5018 West State Street). Spitfires is aptly named…if you’re a wing person, this is the place for you. Their wing sauce flavors include ginger sesame, Thai peanut, and blueberry BBQ (check out the full selection…it’s impressive). But they have other stuff too, like burgers, apps (wonton mozz stix!), and sandwiches at reasonable prices. The wide selection of beer and cocktails is also reasonable too, if their website menu is to be believed.

 

 
city lights brewi9ng american family field shuttles

No, the shuttle doesn’t run on beer. That would be pretty cool though.

American Family Field Shuttles: Downtown Milwaukee

These establishments are located in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, good if you’re staying there or making a day of Milwaukee with, say, the Harley-Davidson Museum. Check this helpful map to see more attractions nearby.

City Lights Brewing (2200 West Mount Vernon Avenue). Okay, an actual craft brewery, now we’re living right. City Lights has won multiple awards for beer excellence, including from the Great American Beer Festival. Their beer offerings include even a coconut porter, and they describe the flavors on their site. Oh, and they have food too, even if it’s a limited menu. Burgers, apps, and of course the obligatory Friday fish fry. (Milwaukee makes it easy to be a Catholic.) And their shuttle is nicely decorated.

City Tours MKE (1130 North 9th Street). Okay, so this one isn’t a free ride…but it’s technically a shuttle so it counts. City Tours Milwaukee includes a “Milwaukee Ultimate Tailgate Tour”, where for a set price they’ll take your group to the game in their electric vehicle, fire up the coals, and set up the tables and stuff for you so you can all tailgate like pros. You have to bring your own food and booze, but that’s small potatoes when someone else drives and cleans up!

Fat Daddy’s (120 West National Avenue). The first words you see on Fat Daddy’s website is “Milwaukee’s Most Organized Volleyball”. Great for Brewers fans that are fed up with disorganized volleyball games. But seriously, outdoor volleyball tournaments on sand here, so that’s unique.

Fat Daddy’s has a limited menu of pizza and snacks, but their list of beers on tap and cocktails is lengthy. Daily drink specials here too. You can ride to the game in the “Fatmobile” and talk with fans about how well organized the volleyball was.

 

jack's american pub Milwaukee Brewers shuttles

Spirits, good times, and a ride to a baseball game. It doesn’t get more American than Jack’s.

Jack’s American Pub (1323 East Brady Street). Have you ever watched a game on a 200” TV? At Jack’s, you can, while enjoying steak fries, Santa Fe rolls, award-winning wings with “gun powder”, or a jalapeno mac and cheese burger. There’s other enticing stuff on the menu too, and several high end beers on tap and in cans. They have multiple shuttles, so you shouldn’t have to wait long for one.

Jack’s (along with some other taverns) actually has tailgate parties at the ballpark too, so they’re all in for Brewers fans. Oh, and brunch for Sunday afternoon games.

Milwaukee Brat House (1013 North King Drive). The Brat House bills itself as a “professional drinking establishment”, so it’s safe if you’re serious about a good time on game day. They actually have “a whole fleet of shuttles”, so they’re clearly here to help.

As the name suggests, they offer “Milwaukee’s Best Bratwurst”. You can try the sampler of bratwurst, Polish, Italian and Hungarian sausage for yourself. Or get your sausage in a gyro, a German-style sandwich, stuffed with honey mustard, etc. They have daily food and drink specials and an impressive selection of brews. The Brat House does tailgates as well.

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O’Lydia’s (338 South First Street). The O’Lydia’s building was built in the 1800s, but the O’Lydia’s people truly saw the potential. There’s a four season patio and 13 large flat screen TVs. O’Lydia’s has some interesting stuff on their menu, including a Reuben mac, Nashville hot chicken mac, and a triple “B” burger.

O’Lydia’s a late night menu, weekend brunch, the obligatory Friday fish fry, and good specials like Thursday Burger Night. They don’t say much about drinks, so I would come here more for Irish pub grub than for serious craft brew tasting.

Oscar’s Pub & Grill (1712 West Pierce Street). Oscar’s website was blocked by my antivirus, but don’t take that personally…my antivirus blocks anything with capital letters on it. Anyway, they’re the first I’ve seen here to mention Bloody Marys, which are popular in Milwaukee. Oscar’s actually garnishes Bloody Marys with mozzarella and bacon, which should be obvious. They also boast about fresh cut fries, and (wait for it) a Friday fish fry.

So if you like burgers and Bloody Marys, you could do worse than Oscar’s.

 

steny's tavern american family field shuttles

Milwaukee’s #1 Sports Bar (?)

Steny’s Tavern (800 South Second Street). Steny’s calls itself Milwaukee’s #1 Sports Bar, which is a pretty bold statement. But they definitely don’t mess around…get your wings brined, fried, sauced and/or baked, and with sauces that include butter garlic parmesan, Carolina gold and lemon pepper. Lots of other great stuff on the menu too, like specialty pizzas, shareable apps platters, double burgers, and salads.

Steny’s has a very impressive craft beer and drinks list, as the #1 sports bar in Milwaukee should. They shuttle fans to every Brewers game. Don’t forget to get the hand stamp though.

Who’s on Third (1007 North King Drive). Who’s On Third also claims to be Milwaukee’s #1 sports bar. They were ranked in the Top 19 in America by Business Insider, so they’re not alone in liking their establishment. The menu features spicy mac and cheese, a nice selection of salads, half pound burgers and sandwiches, and chef’s gumbo. They also have a late night menu of apps if you’re hungry after the game, and the drinks menu features a lot of fancy cocktails. Might be a good place to impress a date.

Wurstbar MKE (1239 East Brady Street). Instead of deciding between two sports bars that call themselves #1, you could go to the Wurstbar in Milwaukee (snort). Wurstbar MKE is on Brady Street, which they call a lively entertainment district. Fair enough. They’re one of the eateries that do tailgates as well.

Their menu features neat apps like crab Rangoon dip and mini corn dogs, and they have several wursts as you would expect…German style, jalapeno popper, and “Miltown”, which was featured on A&E’s Best In Chow. Wurstbar has a Sunday brunch with breakfast items too. They have multiple shuttles, so in theory you shouldn’t be waiting long.

 

 
aris sports bar milwaukee brewers shuttle

You can tell just by the font that you can probably get a decent gyro here.

American Family Field Shuttles: West Milwaukee + West Allis

Aris Sports Bar (1657 South 108th Street, West Allis). The Aris Sports Bar is part of the Pallas restaurant, so you don’t get confused. They have separate menus, but you can get burgers, ribs, steaks, and Greek specialties like souvlaki and gyros at the sports bar. For breakfast on Sundays you can get Greek breakfast burritos. All good. If you’d like a fancier meal, you can go to the Pallas. It’s not far.

The Aris has a BBQ menu too, with sandwiches and platters of pork, smoked turkey and sausage. Good place for a nice meal and a ride.

Braun’s Power House (7100 West National Avenue, West Allis). Braun’s has bar grub and breakfasts, and their prices are a tad more reasonable than most. Their specials include Build A Burger Mondays, starting at just $3! Better yet, 32 oz. beers for just five bucks, at least according to their Facebook header. Apps include powerhouse nachos, loaded waffle fries, and bacon-wrapped water chestnuts. True. They also have boneless wings with multiple sauces and dry rubs, smash burgers, and that ubiquitous Milwaukee Friday fish fry.

Braun’s is a good spot if you’re going cheap, which is probably a factor in your taking a shuttle in the first place, right?

Flapper’s Bar (7527 West Becher Street, West Allis). Flapper’s doesn’t tell the public much about its bar, except that it’s a “fun kinda joint”, which might be good enough. They do offer free pool (as in billiards, I assume) and drink specials until 6:00 PM some nights. You can get baked or deep fried cod, chicken fajita quesadillas, or wonton wrapped mozzarella logs. There are a lot of pics of food on their FB page, so you could have a look at that.

 

liquid johnny's American family field shuttles

Where it’s all about the liquids.

Liquid Johnny’s (540 South 76th Street, West Allis). Liquid Johnny’s pronounces itself “The Best Fish Fry In Town”, a bold claim indeed, and they have a page on their menu dedicated to it. They have other stuff too, of course…like ”frickles”, wings with a variety of dipping sauces, burgers and sandwiches. The beer list isn’t too shabby…multiple premium beers on tap and in bottles, and they have some hard seltzers too.

Liquid Johnny’s has some neat specials…the Burger of The Month as I write this is the “Almost Elvis Burger”. It’s topped with peanut butter, bacon and cheddar. Eat like the King.

Lucky’s Ice House (4238 West Orchard Avenue, West Milwaukee). Lucky’s, like many places, brags on their Friday Fish Fry too. But I’m not complaining about pics of fried perch and tater tots. Lucky’s menu also features apps like “haystack onions”, wraps, sandwiches, and burgers. The “Who Hot Burger” looks good if you’re into spicy. There’s also salads for healthier sorts.

Lucky’s adds a gratuity to parties of six or more. Something to be aware of if you are many.

National Pizza Pub and Grille (Best Western) (5501 West National Avenue). The National Pizza Pub and Grille is part of the Best Western Milwaukee West, making it easy for guests to eat and get to the game. They have a lot of specialty pizzas, like Buffalo chicken, Mexican fiesta, and Reuben (!). It’s not just pizza though, they also have steaks, ribs and fish, as well as multiple burgers and sandwiches. Their apps include Reuben rolls and pulled pork bites. And wings. They actually have a chef here.

This place is pretty reasonable, and with the varied menu it should be good for families. And of course, super convenient if you’re staying at the Best Western.

Paulie’s Pub & Eatery (8031 West Greenfield Avenue, West Allis). Forget Milwaukee…Paulie’s calls itself the “best pub and eatery in Southeastern Wisconsin!” Stretch your horizons! Paulie’s features live music and entertainment, 18 beers on tap, and a location near the state park, so that does bolster the case a bit.

The menu includes wings with…let me see here…12 sauces and seasonings. There’s nachos with beef, chicken or pork, pizzas, and double burgers with multiple toppings. There’s also specialty sandwiches like the Ultimate Grilled Cheese. And a Friday fish fry, as required if you’re gonna call yourself the best.

 

 
Jacksons blue ribbon pub milwaukee brewers shuttles

You can’t beat a plate of macho nachos outside.

American Family Field Shuttles: Wauwatosa + West Wauwatosa

Camp Bar Wauwatosa (6600 West North Avenue). The Camp Bar offers an interesting twist…it’s designed like a log cabin lodge, with a fireplace, moose head in the wall, etc. They have an impressive selection of beers and microbrews, and signature drinks include the “Camp Bar Side Car” and a 22 oz. Bloody Mary. They have a small selection of food…pizzas and apps like tots and Buffalo chicken bites. Great place to go for atmosphere, and in Milwaukee a fireplace can always come in handy.

Jackson’s Blue Ribbon Pub (11302 West Blue Mound Road). The Jackson’s folks are modest. They claim to be “known for our lively and inviting atmosphere, excellent quality food and great service.” Sounds good to me. The menu includes Macho Nachos, wings with nine seasoning/sauce selections, brisket sandwiches, Reubens, and pizza. They seem to have a better selection of wines than most, and a decent beer selection.

Jackson’s is also closest of all of the shuttle bars to the County Zoo, if you’re making a day of that.

McBob’s Pub & Grill (4919 West North Avenue). Who’s “McBob”? It’s owner Christine McRoberts, who has made the place a staple in Milwaukee. They share a customer’s claim that “McBob’s has simply the absolute best corned beef this side of heaven”. The menu is definitely Irish pub fare: Scotch eggs, Irish spring rolls, Reubens, Irish meatloaf and corned beef hash are all here. They have typically American burgers, nachos, and sandwiches too. McBob’s has some nice specials…Happy Hours most days, with $3 tap beer and a $5 limited app menu.

McBob’s does Friday fish frys too, and they’re gluten-free even.

 

 
redbar saucy swine BBQ american family field shuttles

So, why do you call this place the “Redbar”?

American Family Field Shuttles: From A Bit Farther Away

Credit these taverns for literally going the extra mile:

Fin N Feather (4060 West Loomis Road). Fin N Feather has lengthy Happy Hours…like noon to 6:00 PM on Fridays. Other than free billiards though, they don’t specify what’s cheaper, but hey, free pool is good. They don’t say much about the menu on their Facebook page, other than Luige’s pizza with typical toppings. The reviewers seem to agree that the value for drinks here is pretty good, so it might be a good thrifty place to try.

Friends on Forest Home (5614 West Forest Home Avenue, Greenfield). Maybe not the most electric name for a sports bar, but it’s what we have in Greenfield. The shuttle is only for Friday and Saturday home games, so keep that in mind. I can’t find much about their menu, but reviewers praise the food and drink prices. There’s also a lot of activities going on with them, so you can follow their Facebook page to see if anything entices you to visit Greenfield.

Milwaukee Brat House (4022 North Oakland Avenue, Shorewood). This is the “other” location of the aforementioned Brat House; they have a shuttle too but it may take a little longer. The menu is similar; there’s a jalapeno popper mac and cheese brat that looks amazing and lots of other sausages. Signature burgers and chicken sandwiches, fish fry Fridays, and some decent Happy Hour specials. This one does tailgates too.

Again, their specialty is definitely sausages, and if you’re into brats it’s probably the place to be.

Redbar (2245 East Street Francis Avenue, St Francis). Redbar is part of the Saucy Swine restaurant, but the Redbar itself has a dine-in menu. The Saucy Swine is a popular BBQ joint with the locals, with six house sauces, especially since there aren’t many Brewers shuttles in this part of town. Some very unusual apps here, like Korean fried Brussels sprouts, pork belly bites, and bacon cheese bombs. Try the “Queben” sandwich.

 

 
ambassador hotel milwaukee brewers shuttles

Who’s the real Ambassador?

American Family Field Shuttles: Hotels

I have to imagine there are other hotels in Milwaukee with complimentary shuttle service, but here’s the roster of hotels I found that mention the Brewers:

Ambassador Hotel (2308 West Wisconsin Avenue). The Ambassador is easy to find with the cool old-fashioned sign on the roof. They boast of the largest hotel rooms in the area, extreme high speed internet, and Apple TV in each room. There’s actually three places to eat here, for whatever your mood, or you could just walk to a McDonald’s or Taco Bell if you’ve spent too much on the hotel room.

The Ambassador is a nice departure from typical hotel chains (although it is Wyndham), and while it’s not cheap, it’s not out of this world expensive. Incidentally, they extend free parking and shuttle service to anyone who dines there, so no need to stay the night.

Best Western Milwaukee West (5501 West National Avenue, West Milwaukee). As described earlier, the Best Western is where you can find the National Pizza Pub and Grille, so they have an eatery with your Brewers ride. Like most Best Westerns, this one is reasonable, and it’s actually pretty close to the ballpark. They say it’s walking distance…it’s about a mile, so judge that for yourself.

The rooms have cable TV (STOP THE CAR!!!), can have kitchenettes, and include a free breakfast. (It’s the typical hotel breakfast, which for free isn’t bad.) There’s also an indoor pool, fun for the kids. And a pizza joint.

 

Brewhouse inn and suites American family field shuttles

“I’ll have a craft brew, a clean room, and a place to park please.”

Brewhouse Inn & Suites (1215 North 10th Street). The Brewhouse Inn & Suites is actually the site of the original Pabst Blue Ribbon Brewery. It’s now a hotel…but the best part is you can get craft brews there. Nice rooms, too…kitchenettes, brick walls and large windows. Stays include a complimentary buffet breakfast, but there is a fee for parking.

The Brewhouse has their own restaurant (On Tap), with pub grub like beer-brined wings, specialty pizzas and a Blue Ribbon Burger. They have over 40 craft beers and signature cocktails. Game day specials too. Definitely worth a look if you’re visiting Milwaukee, enjoy good beer, and are planning a Brewers game.

Hampton Inn & Suites Milwaukee West (8201 West Greenfield Avenue, West Allis). Hampton says that “American Family Field ballgames are five minutes from our door via free shuttle.” So it’s clearly a selling point. Hampton Inns are generally pretty nice places, and this one includes a free hot breakfast, an indoor pool, EV charging, free parking, and even room service.

They don’t actually have a restaurant on the site (I don’t think), but there’s quite a few eateries right here, including Big Deal Burgers & Custard, Peace & Love Sourdough, McDonald’s (!), and the aforementioned Paulie’s Pub with their own shuttle. Win-win!

Sonesta Milwaukee West Wauwatosa (10499 West Innovation Drive, Wauwatosa). The Sonesta is actually a pet-friendly hotel, although I’m not sure what you’d do with your dog during the game. They also go above and beyond just a shuttle to games…the Sonesta offers a Brewers package, which includes a bucket of beer, complimentary transportation to the game, and a “ballpark buffet”…I’m not sure what that includes.

Sonesta has an indoor pool and hot tub, and free parking. It seems geared to business travelers, but hey, Brewers fans mean business. Their “Innovation” restaurant is closed as I write this, but Ally’s Power House Café is very close if a meal is in your plans.

 

Milwaukee brewers free shuttles to american family field

Because Red wants you to get to the ballgame safely.

Whew! Well there you have it fans; your complete list of shuttle options for Milwaukee Brewers home games. In case it matters to you, the Brewers offer a downloadable map of drop-off points at the ballpark; you can find that here.

Thanks for reading…I know I went long here! But plenty more where that came from. Check out more American Family Field tips here, including this useful post on parking at Brewers games, some helpful tailgating tips, and some info when you’re bringing the kids!

Note: this post contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!

Prepaid Baseball Game Parking With SpotHero

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’ve read my ballpark tips for a while, you know that I will always recommend whether to use your car or public transit to a game. But if you’re driving and parking at or near the ballpark, you should always have a plan. You do NOT want to be driving around Baltimore or Boston looking for a decent and affordable spot. (I speak from experience!)

Using SpotHero makes the process simple, and even fun if you do it right!

baseball parking spothero

Sitting in ungodly slow traffic with a full bladder in Toronto or Washington can make for a memorable ballgame experience for the wrong reasons. You could also, of course, seriously overpay for parking if you go without a plan (see: Fenway Park).

So while I offer a lot of advice here, it does come down to booking in advance. This is especially the case if the ballpark is in the heart of the city, as many of the newer ones are. If most fans going to the game use public transit because of traffic and costs, SpotHero is your best bet for parking.

 

fenway park parking guide

You can do better than this. Stick with me.

What I love about SpotHero is that I can choose well ahead of time where I’d like to park, and I choose my spot based on a number of factors.

In Baltimore, for example, I find a garage near the Inner Harbor for a nice waterfront walk before or after the game.

In Pittsburgh, I find a spot near the other side of the Clemente Bridge, for a stunning approach to the ballpark.

In Boston, I get a spot near the Prudential Center…it’s a long walk, but I can also use Commuter Rail (or a Boston Pedicab!) and get off a fly ball away from the ballpark…at a lot where people paid five times as much as I did to park.

In Atlanta, I just want to be able to find my car after the game.

 

Ruppert Garage Yankee Stadium

And of course, you get the bonus of parking your own car. No one likes to park someone else’s at the game.

You can choose your spot based on the easiest exit, be near other city attractions or eateries, or simply go cheap.

Here’s a favorite trick of mine in several cities: if you’re making a day of visiting the city with your baseball, you can land a spot near a public transit station that will take you to the game and back (or the other way around). In some places, you can park close to the ballpark before the event rate kicks in, and enjoy a day in the city before the game. I’ve done this numerous times and saved a bundle.

SpotHero provides other details too, including if your car will be under elevated train tracks and may get oil spilled on it. (That’s a thing in Chicago. True.) Each spot description shows a star based review, whether you have in/out privileges, and even a photo of the lot or garage entrance so you know what it looks like, which is very helpful in a big city.

 

parking near rogers centre green p 40 york

This is a pretty sweet evening rate for baseball parking. Even in Canadian dollars.

Order the spot, get the address, put it in your map app, and go. Show your barcode at the entrance and you’re in. Easy peezy.

As some of you know, I used to be a fan of ParkWhiz. They aren’t bad, but I’ve definitely found that SpotHero offers a larger selection and is better for baseball game parking. When I found myself using SpotHero instead of ParkWhiz based on that, I switched my affiliation, and now SpotHero is the Official Prepaid Parking of Ballpark E-Guides!

(Again, that’s not really a thing, but it sounds good.)

 

camden yards parking orioles lots

So many choices. Who wants to think about it on game day?

In a downtown city ballpark especially, try SpotHero for your ballgame parking. Or any prepaid parking, for that matter.

And please use this link to tell ‘em Ballpark E-Guides sent you!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tips | Chicago White Sox

Posted by Kurt Smith

Planning to go to a Chicago White Sox baseball game? Here are my best Guaranteed Rate Field parking tips – including alternate routes, tavern shuttles, and of course, money saving advice!

Guaranteed Rate Field, unlike its neighbor Wrigley Field to the north, offers ample enough parking that getting there by car is generally easy enough, and in some cases preferable to getting there by CTA train or other means. (I’ll discuss those in a future post.)

I’ve covered a lot here, so I’m breaking it down for you:

Alternate Routes to Guaranteed Rate Field
Chicago White Sox Parking Lots
Chicago White Sox Tailgating
Other Parking Lots + Street Parking
White Sox Tavern Shuttles

 

guaranteed rate field parking tips chicago white sox

I know, there are so many. Not to worry, I’ll help you pick a spot!

Okay, ready? Let’s get started after this quick word from our sponsor:

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alternate routes to white sox guaranteed rate field

Visualize yourself using the right exit!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #1: Alternate Routes to White Sox Games. Guaranteed Rate is located at Exit 55 (35th Street exit) off Interstate 90/94, also called the Dan Ryan Expressway. It is visible from the highway, and the parking lots at the ballpark are right there after exiting.

The Dan Ryan was once ranked by a heavy traffic research company as the second worst bottleneck of traffic in America. But the positive of such problems is that generous and busy Internet users post alternate routes, which can still be used today for high attendance games.

I haven’t tried these routes myself, but they might be worth a look if you don’t want to get caught up in the herd:

 

I-57 to white sox game alternate route

If you end up in Indiana, you’ve gone too far.

Going north on I-57 from the south: Exit at Halstead Street just before the merge with I-90/94. Turn left to go north on Halstead, then turn left on 95th St. (U.S. Route 12/20) and then right on Ashland Avenue. Follow Ashland all the way to 35th St., and then turn right towards the ballpark.

Going north on I-90/94 from south of the city: Instead of using exit 55A onto South LaSalle St., use exit 55B to S. LaSalle, and then make a left onto Pershing Road. From there you can make a right onto South Princeton Avenue towards the ballpark.

This route backwards, incidentally, can make for an easier exit. (I mean following the steps in reverse, not actually driving backwards.)

 

Alternate routes to chicago white sox games

They put a ramp there for you and everything. Chicago’s got your back!

Coming from the south using I-90 or I-94: Use the Stony Island Avenue exit (it’s closer to the park from I-90). Go north on Stony Island Avenue, following the signs to Lake Shore Drive (Stony Island turns into South Cornell Avenue and East 57th Street).

Head north on Lake Shore Drive (U.S. Route 41) to 31st Street, and make a left and head west on 31st. After passing under I-90/94, turn left on Wentworth and head south on Wentworth till you get to the ballpark.

 

alternate routes to guaranteed rate field events

Follow the smart people to the White Sox game!

Coming from southwest on I-55 (Stevenson Expressway) North: Use the South Ashland Avenue exit and make a right onto S. Ashland. Take S. Ashland to 35th St. and turn left towards the ballpark.

Coming from the west on I-290 (Eisenhower Expressway): Use the Ashland Avenue exit; head south on Ashland and make a left on 35th.

 

how to get to guaranteed rate field from O'Hare Airport

OK so the signs need some straightening, but you get the idea.

From the northwest/O’Hare: Use I-90 and merge with I-90/94 east, use the Roosevelt Road exit, and head west on Roosevelt to Halstead. Make a left on Halstead and head south until reaching 35th St. Turn left on 35th towards the ballpark.

Again, I would only use these if the I-90/94 Dan Ryan traffic is particularly bad. The Dan Ryan is supposedly much better since the construction period. In many cases, you can just use Halstead St. or Ashland Avenue if you’re looking for a back road.

 

illinois tollbooth

If you’re from metropolitan Chicago, you know.

One more thing about driving to Guaranteed Rate Field: coming from outside metropolitan Chicago, be sure to have an EZPass or IPass. Illinois rivals New Jersey in toll roads (and that’s saying something). If you don’t have a toll pass, just go to the Illinois Tollway website and look up your license plate.
 

 
chicago white sox official parking tips

Get a view of the city, and keep an eye on your car!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #2: White Sox Parking. The White Sox have a large amount of available parking in their official lots close to the ballpark, approximately 7,000 parking spaces. It’s usually enough, especially since plenty of fans use public transportation to go to games. You can view their parking info here.

As of 2023, the parking price is $27 when pre-paid, and $30 at the gate; for Sunday games that drops to $17 and $20 respectively. All of the Sox lots cost the same, so no need to waste time circling the park. The Sox sell their advance parking through ParkWhiz, and there’s a fee included, so there isn’t any savings buying in advance, but you’ll have a better spot.

Season ticket and multi-game plan members can buy their parking in advance at a cheaper price (about $5 less a game), and you might find a cheaper pass on eBay. The coupons require parking in a certain lot, so you can check the Sox website if you land one to see where to use it.

 

guaranteed rate field white sox parking

They don’t take cash anymore, but that’s not why I haven’t gone to a game since.

The signs directing drivers to the parking areas are color-coded for pre-paid coupons. The pre-paid red lots A, B, and C are north of the ballpark and are far more accessible to and from the Interstate; green lots F and L are west and south of the ballpark take longer to exit. You should probably get a pre-paid pass, just to be in a better spot.

If you haven’t bought a parking pass, keep in mind you’ll be parking in Lots F or L south of the ballpark, so plan your entrance accordingly. Also, don’t bother with cash…it’s credit cards or debit parking only on the day of game nowadays. I’ve read they’ll take cash, but the attendants won’t be happy about it.

The Sox open their lots two hours before first pitch on game days. If you’re early enough you don’t need to worry about pre-purchasing a spot, except for Opening Day or a Cubs game, but it’s only a buck or two more to do it.

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white sox overflow parking game days IIT

The Green Line station offers a fine view of additional parking.

If parking does fill up, which is rare, the Sox will provide shuttle service from The McCormick Place Garage C (29th Street and Fort Dearborn Drive), and at IIT east of the ballpark.

Lot A is now designated for rideshare service and bus parking; it stays open an hour after the game ends.

If you break down in the lot after the game, you can go to a Guest Relations booth or find a parking lot supervisor, and they’ll usually arrange for towing your car if needed.

Finally, if the game is postponed, you can use the parking coupon for a future game. Details on the back of the coupon.

 

chicago white sox parking tips

The parking lot is even closer than the train station!

Honestly, even though it’s pricey by major league baseball standards, my best advice for White Sox game parking is to buy a pre-paid pass and park in one of the official lots. Arrive early if you can to avoid the bottlenecks. If you want to save money and are including a meal with your game, try one of the tavern shuttles below.

And of course, remember you can book your parking anywhere in Chicago in advance with the pros at SpotHero.

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chicago white sox tailgating guaranteed rate field parking

“And at game time, the score is still zed-zed!”

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #3: White Sox Tailgating. The Sox encourage tailgating, even to the point of offering picnic tables and space for private tailgating parties. Should you gather a group for a party, the Sox give discounts for tickets and will even throw in some parking passes. No kegs, large grills, DJs, or loud music unfortunately. Remember to park your bus in Lot A.

The tailgating scene at the South Side is popular in White Sox fandom. It’s not quite at the level of American Family Field 90 miles north in Milwaukee, but often there will be bands playing, bag-throwing games or folks giving out freebies. Tailgating stops when the game starts and is not allowed after the game—and nor is bringing alcohol outside of the lot.

 

white sox tailgating party

Featuring ivy on the fence for that Chicago baseball experience!

There are restrooms near the main entrance of the park or in the ChiSox Bar & Grill restaurant that you can use, and there are receptacles in most lots to dump your hot coals.

If you’d like to reserve a tailgating spot from the White Sox for your baseball party, you can do that here. The nice part of that is that you can show up three hours before game time instead of two, so no need to slam those beers down on the clock.

Since the Sox reserve tailgating spaces in Lots B and E, that’s the place to wander around if you want to have a brew and sausage with tailgating Sox faithful.

 

 
guaranteed rate field parking satellite

And if you’re a VIP, we won’t park you in!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #4: Street Parking and Other Lots. You won’t have an easy time finding nearby street parking at the ballpark. Since the neighborhood has been condo-fied, street ordinances have been put in place to protect the locals’ parking spots. Parking without a residential parking permit in the wrong spot will get you a very stiff fine and a towing.

West of the park in the Halstead St. area are meters that only need to be fed until 6:00 PM, but you could have some difficulty finding these, and unless you live in the area, you may not be comfortable leaving your car there.

 

35th street red hots white sox parking

I had a very nice conversation with this lovely lady. Chicago folks are really cool.

Some residents and businesses west of the park on 35th, like the 35th Street Red Hots people, will sell you their parking spots, but you probably won’t find any real bargains—the main attraction is the easy exit after the game, so they claim. Not sure how, since you’re further from the interstate, but maybe it’s because it takes a while to empty those large White Sox lots.

 

white sox parking grandstand sports 35th street

What better way to sell White Sox gear than to offer game day parking?

The Grandstand store west of the ballpark on 35th has a lot across the street, and you’re close to a great Chicago sports team store with cool gear there if that interests you. I’m guessing stuff there is cheaper than at the ballpark.

I’ve read in forums that you can park for free on side streets off of 35th; just east of the Dan Ryan near IIT and the Green Line stop. That is where the neighborhood has reportedly improved, but it’s the south side of Chicago, so that one is up to you.

 

chicago white sox game parking chinatown

With the new pitch clock, you can make it back in three hours!

Try Chinatown… There is a parking lot near the Cermak-Chinatown Station of the CTA Red Line north of the park; parking there for ten hours is cheaper than at the ballpark and it’s a one-stop trip on the Red Line (it’s a long walk, about 15 blocks, I wouldn’t do it at night).

On weekdays you might be able to find cheap metered parking in the area, and even with the extra few bucks for the Red Line, it’s still a good deal.

There is even some free street parking in Chinatown (I’ve seen cars parked on Wentworth Street), if you have time to look around near the station a bit and get lucky. But if you see a sign that says “Don’t Park Here”, obey it.

 

chinatown chicago guaranteed rate field parking

Dumplings make great ballpark food.

There are also many places where you can grab a bite or fill up your goody bag in Chinatown; remember you can bring your own food into the ballpark.

For that matter, you could book a cheaper spot anywhere near the Red Line or Green Line if you’re comfortable with an area in Chicago, or want to be somewhere in the city after the game. Both lines have a station near the ballpark.

 

 
buffalo wings and rings white sox shuttle

Wings, beer, a free ride and a free shuttle to the White Sox game…and they even sponsor this comfortable Chicago street bench!

Guaranteed Rate Field Parking Tip #5: White Sox Game Shuttles. So, where do you go if you don’t want to pay the parking fees? There are actually dining establishments in the area that will take you to the park:

 

buffalo wings and rings white sox shuttle bus

The shuttle bus beats walking!

Buffalo Wings and Rings on South Halstead St. west of the park runs a shuttle an hour before the game and will pick you up for 30 minutes after the game. They have free valet parking and parking in the back if there is space available, and there is also metered parking nearby on Halstead.

It’s ideal if you love beer and wings. Wings come in a large variety of flavors, including sweet Thai chili, lemon pepper, and (I’m not making this up) blueberry chipotle BBQ. Blueberry chipotle BBQ wings, beer and free parking…what could go better with White Sox baseball!

 

connies pizza white sox shuttle

You can even help them deliver a few pizzas on the way.

Connie’s Pizza The Bridgeport location of Connie’s Pizza offers free parking in their lot, and if you dine in their restaurant, they’ll give you a ride in their free shuttle bus. The bus runs for an hour before and after games.

Their pizza is no slouch of course…as I write this, it’s #322 of 10,820 Chicago restaurants on TripAdvisor, putting Connie’s in the something percentile which is pretty good in this town. It’s true deep dish pizza, and combined with a White Sox game is a full Chicago experience.

Connie’s also offers game day specials, so enjoy a beer or two before the game, especially since you won’t have to drive.

 

ricobene's white sox shuttle

With helpful instructions right there on the sign!

Note: I contacted the Ricobene’s folks and they’re not offering shuttle service to White Sox games at the moment. Nuts. But I’m leaving this here in case things change. You can tell them I sent you!

Ricobene’s The Ricobene’s restaurant on West 26th St. has a free shuttle to Sox games for patrons; they draw pretty good crowds on Sox game nights not just for the shuttle but for the food; the hefty breaded steak sandwich and pizzas are especially popular. Check out the Yelp reviews…this place is revered.

Ricobene’s has ample parking with a lot under I-90 and there’s some street parking nearby, and reportedly they’re very good about accommodating anyone who needs a lift to the game, even for leaving the game early.

 

reggies rock bus chicago white sox

You can’t not want to ride in the Reggies Rock Bus. (photo courtesy of Reggies Live)

Reggies Live on South State St. is a good hike away from the park but will take patrons to and from Sox games on their own very cool-looking “Reggies Rock Bus”. It’s just a block away from the Chinatown station on the Red Line or the Cermak-McCormick Place station on the Green Line. You can use those if you don’t want to wait or if you miss the bus after the game.

There is some metered parking on State St., but it is difficult to find, and there is a cover to get in, so this is best for folks interested in a show or a party after the game. That said, lots of folks will tell you Reggies is worth it.

Reggie’s occasionally even throws in a package that includes free bleacher ticket to the game and a BBQ with the ride, so it can make for a pretty cool and economical Chicago evening. You can hang out in the music club or on a rooftop deck (there’s even a retro record store), and the wings here are mighty popular.

A meal and a ride to the ballgame is great, but these things tend to be shaky…I would check with any of these establishments before making them part of your game plan, even though I’m sharing these four because they seem to be consistent.

 

Chicago white sox parking tips guaranteed rate field

“And then when the game’s over, we’ll be the first ones out! We’re Griswolds!”

There you go my friends, all of my best tips for Chicago White Sox game parking. Hope you found it useful…stay tuned, I’ll soon be offering other ways to get to games at the new Comiskey Park.

Thanks for reading, and if you need more Guaranteed Rate Field game tips, click here! Check out this great post for choosing a seat, and see some great food options here.

(And click here for some great tips for Chicago Cubs home games!)

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Tropicana Field Parking Guide | Tampa Bay Rays

Posted by Kurt Smith

Here it is Rays fans and Tampa Bay visitors…your complete Tropicana Field parking guide for your next Rays baseball game! I’m here to help you find the best Rays parking…whether you’re looking to be close to the ballpark, save some money, enjoy a pre- or post-game party, or even take advantage of the useful shuttles to the Trop.

I’m even throwing in some alternate routes, to help you with the much-maligned traffic problem in Tampa Bay.

You actually have a lot of options, so I’m breaking this down:

Alternate Routes to Tropicana Field
Tampa Bay Rays Parking
Ferg’s Parking For Rays Games
Satellite Tropicana Field Parking Lots + Garages
Free And Cheap Street Parking
The Baseball Shuttle and Pier Parking
The SunRunner
The Brew Bus
The Cross-Bay Ferry

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Alternate routes to tampa bay rays games

All roads lead right…to congestion.

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #1) Alternate Routes to Rays Games. Driving to the Trop is simple enough in theory. The Trop is easily accessible by I-275 at exits 21 and 23B (I-175 and I-375 also feed into the ballpark area), and the big white dome is visible for miles. The Rays have a nice little parking map on their website with some helpful info.

That said, traffic can be a major issue on weeknights, especially for folks coming from Tampa or Orlando. This is one of the bigger knocks on the location of the ballpark…and one oft-cited reason for chronic low attendance despite a perennially good team.

Coming from east of the bay, I highly suggest leaving early, before rush hour if you can. Having driven on I-4 (the route of Disney-destined tourists), I’d far rather pay the toll for a lesser-used route. If you don’t have one, it’s definitely a good idea to get a SunPass to avoid sitting at tollbooths (EZPass works fine if you’re not a Floridian).

 

alternate routes to Tropicana Field

Don’t believe the hype…there’s alternatives!

Here are some suggestions for avoiding traffic that I’ve read. I haven’t tried these, so don’t hold me to them, but they might help.

Coming from the north, you can get off I-275 at 22nd Avenue and make a right onto 16th Street; this could route you past I-275 backups, and the Trop itself is on 16th Street South.

Coming from south Tampa, using Gandy Boulevard (CR-600 or U.S. 92) over the Gandy Bridge to 4th Street (also U.S. 92) is reportedly a bit easier than using I-275 and the Howard Frankland Bridge over Tampa Bay. It doesn’t look easier on a map, but people say traffic really moves.

Coming from areas south of St. Petersburg, like Bradenton, etc., drivers have to use I-275 over the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, which costs a small toll. From the south you can exit I-275 at 26th Avenue, make a right onto 26th, and then a left onto 16th towards the ballpark. Or you could use the 31st Street exit and make a right onto 5th Street.

If traffic is particularly bad, you can use the 54th Street exit, make a left onto 31st and a right onto 26th.

Here’s Tropicana Field on Google Maps to help you visualize all of this.

 

 
Tropicana Field Parking Guide Tampa Bay Rays

See it? You can just make it out through the trees.

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #2) Tampa Bay Rays Parking. There are about 7,000 spaces directly at the Trop. The Rays sell prepaid parking passes on their website, but you probably won’t need it for most games if you’re here an hour or more before game time, especially on a weeknight. Like with tickets, parking for premium games (Yankees, Red Sox, World Series, etc.) is more expensive.

“Premier” lots 1 and 5, with easy access in and out, are a few bucks more than the other lots, and these are lots that people usually prepay for (and they will tell you it’s worth the few extra bucks). The Rays don’t accept cash payment for parking anymore, so borrow someone’s credit card.

The Rays offer wheelchair and accessible parking spaces in Lots 1 and 7. They are very well laid out and close to the center field and home plate entrances. They also have a drop-off area at the corner of 4th Avenue and 16th Street, near the home plate entrance (which is not the rotunda, btw).

Tailgating is permitted in the Rays general parking lots, and there are port-a-potties available for relief. It’s nowhere near Milwaukee as far as the scene, but a few folks set up grills and eat and drink beforehand. On occasion there is entertainment outside.

 

 
ferg's sports bar rays parking

I’m here for the good times…AND the convenient parking!

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #3) Ferg’s Sports Bar. Outside of the Rays parking lots there is some parking at Ferg’s, the popular post-game hangout that is close enough to the Trop to make the parking price a relative bargain. It’s literally right there at the ballpark…it’s actually closer than some of the Rays’ official lots. They even have tunnel access from the venue to the ballpark, great for those stormy Florida days.

Ferg’s will occasionally give discount coupons for their tavern to folks that park there. Perfect if you were including some time at Ferg’s in your plans, as many Rays fans do…they’ve got craft beers, burgers and wings, and 90-something TV sets.

Ferg’s is a big and popular place with a great location, and if you’re into sports bars and pre- or post-game libations you’ll love it. Even if you’re not doing a party, Ferg’s might be the best value for Tropicana Field parking.

 

 
tropicana field parking st. petersburg lots johns hopkins middle school

You don’t need a middle school education to park within view of Tropicana Field!

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #4) City Lots. If you don’t mind walking a bit in downtown St. Petersburg for a cheaper option, there are an additional 4,000 spaces in nearby street lots. East of the ballpark along 1st Avenue, or north of the Trop along 16th Street, there are several St. Petersburg-approved lots that can be much cheaper than the Rays lots on game nights.

Keep in mind that the Rays’ lots east of the ballpark are fairly large, so if you choose one of these it could be at least a 5-10 minute walk to get to the rotunda entrance. Several fans online have recommended the Johns Hopkins Middle School parking lot southwest of the Trop. It’s among the cheaper options and just a half mile walk.

You can look for the signs with a blue P; this means the lot is city-approved. Most lots charge about half or what the Trop charges, so if there are less than three of you this is a better deal. No tailgating though.

 

 
street parking for tampa bay rays games

It might be cool to have Elvis tow your car, but I doubt it would be worth the price.

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #5) Street Parking. Near the shuttle stop at the Pier, or north of the ballpark on Central Avenue, you might find some metered parking that is deactivated for the evening, but unless you see something that says it is, don’t try a metered spot either here or near the Trop.

Most meters only have enough time for two hours and run until 11:00 PM. I’ve read differing accounts on how tough St. Petersburg is on street parking regulations; just pay a few bucks for a lot if you’re not certain. Garages at the waterfront are cheap and a better option, as I’ll discuss in a moment.

According to the St. Pete Times, there is some free street parking on 3rd Avenue South between 4th and 8th Streets. They admit it’s at least a five-block walk, but the exercise can’t hurt. There’s also reportedly free street parking on 2nd Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets.

 

tampa bay rays parking pedestrian overpass

With a helpful police officer to direct you across the street afterward.

On the south side of the Trop is a handicapped accessible pedestrian overpass that was built to enable people living in the Campbell Park area to cross I-175 to get to Rays games. There are two parking lots in the park there (not sure what they cost if anything), and it’s fairly close to the ballpark with a nice view crossing a highway. I might not do it at night (I’ve read it isn’t the best of areas), but it could be pleasant for day games.

If you’re taking a bus with a group, the city will let you park for free on 4th Avenue South, between 9th and 10th Streets.

As far as other free parking options, I’ve read some tips in the Reddit world. Suggestions include north of the ballpark on Burlington Avenue, between 14th and 15th Streets (this is a hike), and some of the side streets close to the pier (this is an even longer hike, but check out the shuttles bit coming). Honestly it’s probably not going to be worth the trouble here.

 

 
tampa bay rays baseball shuttle

“Have mercy…been waitin’ for the baseball shuttle all day…”

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #6) Baseball Shuttle. For all home games now, even games that have a post-game concert, the Rays and St. Petersburg offer a free Baseball Shuttle (also called the Baseball Looper Trolley) that runs from 2nd St. between Central and First Avenues (under the pedestrian bridge), and from 16th Street just south of 3rd Avenue to the ballpark.

The shuttle starts picking up passengers 90 minutes before the game, and runs for one hour after the game, with service approximately every 5-10 minutes. It will also continue to run after a post-game concert.

I’ve used the baseball shuttle with a family of four, and I’m a big fan. Nothing like very cheap parking and much less congestion. You might be waiting a bit after the game, but otherwise it’s well worth it.

 

st. petersburg downtown looper

The schedule sign is kind of tough to read driving by it. I’d pull over for a good look.

If the Baseball Shuttle isn’t running (the policy changes from season to season for which games it’s available), the PSTA Central Avenue Trolley bus runs from the pier and along Central Avenue, with a couple of stops near the Trop.

This can be used on Friday and Saturday nights for a tiny fee, and there is inexpensive parking near the Pier, but check the schedule to make sure you can get back on time. If you’re out of the ballpark by 10:30 or so you should be fine, although extra innings might be a problem.

The shuttles are nice because you have dining and entertainment options downtown before or after the game; but again, check the schedule.

Incidentally, several PSTA bus routes stop at 1st Avenue and 2nd Street north of the shuttle; might not be bad for a weekend game if the PSTA schedule permits.

There are several major lots near the Baseball Shuttle pickup location:

 

al lang field topricana field parking

Real progress is naming a minor league ballpark after an actual person!

Rays Shuttle Parking: Al Lang Stadium. Al Lang Stadium (formerly Progress Energy Park) has a fair amount of inexpensive parking right at the Pier, and it’s a short walk to the Shuttle stop. You can usually park all day for a small fee at Al Lang, so if you want to include a visit to the Salvador Dali museum across the street it’s very convenient.

 

Tropicana field parking sundial garage

“Duck!”

Rays Shuttle Parking: Sundial Parking Garage. The Sundial is for the entertainment complex located on the corner of 2nd St. and 2nd Avenue North. It is at the shuttle stop, and the walkway to get to it is well lit at night. The easiest entrance to this lot is traveling south on 2nd St.

According to the nice lady I contacted from the Pier, the event rate doesn’t apply to Rays games because of the distance, but it does kick in for outings at the Pier. Something to be mindful of, although the event rate isn’t usually too high. If there isn’t anything going on, parking is cheap.

 

Tampa bay rays parking south core garage

You don’t need to have a car as small as a Smart car, but I wouldn’t try parking a FedEx truck here.

Rays Shuttle Parking: South Core Garage. The South Core Garage is located right off of 1st Avenue South, a block away from the pier. This is also close to the shuttle and inexpensive; as with the Sundial garage, the event rate kicks in for local events but not ballgames.

Generally the South Core Garage fills up on Opening Day, so have a backup plan if you need it; most of the time the overflow goes to the Sundial.

 

 
st. petersburg sunrunner rays games

Showing team spirit no less! (photo courtesy of PSTA)

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #7) The SunRunner. PSTA (Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority) has added a nice new service that makes getting to Rays games a bit easier. The SunRunner is an eco-friendly bus that uses designated lanes to bypass traffic. Even better, at the moment it’s free (that may change after 2023). It stops on the north side of Tropicana Field.

The SunRunner’s route extends from St. Pete Beach to near the Pier and Cross Bay Ferry. It also stops near the Albert Whitted Airport if you’re flying in for a game. It is a pretty long route, so there’s plenty places to park along it. Plan ahead and park near a good restaurant or attraction (there are plenty of them).

There’s two advantages to using the SunRunner. The first is that with separate lanes for its route, it avoids ballgame traffic that your car can’t. The second is that you can save on parking, without adding to your walk. Brilliant!

The PSTA folks tout “free on-street parking” as one of your options using the SunRunner. I’m sure that’s true, but if you don’t know the area you can use a public lot or garage near the route. It should be easy to find something cheap.

The SunRunner runs until midnight. You should be easily able to make it back, especially with ballgames being faster these days. Buses run every 30 minutes after 8:00 PM.

 

I haven’t yet found an easy solution for avoiding traffic and wasting gas going to a Rays game. There’s not much as far as public transportation from outside St. Petersburg. But here are some options if you’re across the bay (and if you share this annoyance with other fans in the area):

 

 
Brew bus tours to rays games

And of course, you feel smart riding on this bus. (photo courtesy of Brew Bus Tours)

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #8) The Brew Bus. The Brew Bus people are based in several Florida cities. Their focus is providing transportation to folks that want to tour breweries in South Florida or Tampa Bay, but they offer shuttle service to Tropicana Field for select regular season games.

They’ll take you from Cigar City Brewing in Tampa (you can park there for free) to Ferg’s across the street from the Trop and back afterward. They throw your game ticket and a couple of beers in the package too. Good craft beers too, not the generic stuff. So this is extra cool, especially to avoid navigating through the traffic and finding a spot.

The price is reasonable for everything included, and the Brew Bus people are popular with locals. You may decide you’d like to do a brewery tour with them sometime.

The bus leaves to go back 20 minutes after the game, so be sure to be back by then.

 

 
pier parking tropicana field

Being so close to the pier opens up options!

Tropicana Field Parking, Tip #9) The Cross-Bay Ferry. OK, maybe it isn’t a parking tip, but just putting this out there.

The Cross-Bay Ferry runs from the Tampa Convention Center and drops riders off near the St. Petersburg Pier. Presumably from there you could use the Baseball Shuttle or the SunRunner to get to the ballpark. You should be able to find parking near the Convention Center easily enough, although I don’t know if it would be free.

Unfortunately the ferry doesn’t run late enough to make it viable for weeknight games, and on weekends traffic isn’t that bad from Tampa anyway. It might be nice for a romantic outing or something, but it won’t save you any traffic headaches or money.

 

tropicana field parking tips

Baseball. Parking. The two just go together.

There you go baseball fans…your exhaustive user-friendly guide to parking at Tropicana Field! I hope you’ve found this useful for all your future Tampa Bay Rays games, and I gave you some options you might not have known about. Remember, getting to the ballpark is half the fun!

Click here for some more Tropicana Field tips…and thanks for reading. Please support Ballpark E-Guides sponsors, and keep this website rolling!

Planning a trip to Tampa Bay to see the Rays? Save a bunch of money on hotels, flights and rental cars…book your trip with my friends at Hotwire! (It’s still Kurt’s favorite!)

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Progressive Field Parking Guide | Cleveland Guardians

Posted by Kurt Smith

You need a plan when you’re attending a Guardians game…I’m here to help, with this detailed and useful Progressive Field parking guide! This page is full of great Cleveland Guardians game parking tips, whether you’re looking to save money, be close to the ballpark, get an easier out after the game, or enjoy a meal and drink with your baseball.

(Need more Progressive Field help? Check out this guide to finding a great seat, and this post about the amazing food selection at the home of the Guardians!

 

progressive field parking guide cleveland guardians

Well this is helpful…I guess I’ll take a picture and use that next time.

There’s a wide variety of options, so I’ve broken it down (but read it all if you can, great tips here!):

Progressive Field Parking Tips

Alternate Routes To Cleveland Guardians Games
General Parking Notes
Gateway East Garage
East 9th Street Parking Lots
Nearby Restaurant Parking
Tower City Garage
Other Third Party Lots
Free and Cheap Street Parking
Shuttles to Progressive Field

Ready? Okay great…but first, this highly applicable bit of advice from our sponsor: book your Guardians game parking passes in advance with SpotHero!

Never drive to Progressive Field without a plan…

Book your parking spot now with my friends at SpotHero!

 
 
 
 

 

 
alternate routes to guardians ballpark

You want to be where all of these cars aren’t.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #1) Alternate Routes to Progressive Field. I love the GPS apps you can use to get places these days, but they often underestimate how long it takes to get through city traffic, so I’m offering some alternate routes to the ballpark here.

Progressive Field is easy enough to get to from I-90 and I-71 (which are the same road near the ballpark) from the southwest, and on I-77 from the southeast. However, there isn’t a super-sized parking facility located at the ballpark, so you don’t necessarily want to just put “Progressive Field” in your GPS.

Auto and pedestrian traffic can get heavy, and the Guardians suggest avoiding the streets bordering the ballpark close to game time (and I second that).

Since Progressive Field is located at several interstate exits and most people will be using those, you can try approaching the ballpark from the north or west.

 

progressive field parking guide alternate routes

There’s lots of roads you can use. In fact, use them all and practice!

From I-77, for example, you can use the East 14th St. exit and stay on East 14th to Prospect Avenue, and then make a left onto Prospect and nearby slightly cheaper parking. From I-90 there is now an East 9th Street exit, but you can also use the East 22nd Street exit, and head north on East 22nd to Prospect.

Most people use East 9th, and there isn’t much in the way of parking on the west side of the park (Ontario Street) until you get near Tower City. If you can find a way to approach the ballpark from the north or east using the Shoreway (Ohio Route 2 from I-90 east of the ballpark, and U.S. 6/20 west of the park), you may have an easier time of it, especially with construction going on.

 

rocket mortgage field house guardians parking

Oh yeah, did I mention there could be another thing people are coming to see?

You should definitely be aware if there is a Cavaliers home game. The Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse is just a few feet away from Progressive Field, and decent parking becomes scarcer when both teams are playing or if there is another event going on. If the Cavs are home that night, you should either get there very early, or consider using RTA rail.

Leaving the ballpark, unless you’re parked right off of the Interstate, it might be easier to head north on East 9th and then make a right onto Superior Avenue to get to I-90. From I-90 you can easily access I-77 and I-71.

The city has removed the direct entrance to I-77 from E. 9th (you’ll thank them); you can now hop on the interstate from Orange Avenue and you can detour onto Broadway Avenue if Orange is too congested.

Here’s the Google map of the Progressive Field area to help you visualize all of this.

 

 
progressive field parking for cleveland guardians games

Getting to this point is pretty much the easy part.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #2) General Parking Notes. There isn’t a lot of area parking that’s run by the team, but there are numerous lots in the downtown Cleveland area that work fine for a ballgame.

The Guardians claim that there is enough entertainment complex parking to accommodate a simultaneous Guardians and Cavaliers sellout. The key phrase there is “in the area”—that could mean you’ll be walking a little bit; and expect a price hike if the Cavs are in the playoffs. (Again, if both teams are playing, I suggest using rapid transit if you can.)

Parking prices for most Guardians games ranges from $10 to $50 as of this writing. It isn’t difficult to find a decent spot at a good price, so long as you don’t grab the first thing you see, especially coming from I-77. Prices will increase in many lots if the Yankees or another high-value opponent is in town.

For a weekday game, you should arrive earlier and use the Gateway East lot, since most of the other lots will be filled with commuters. You can (and should) book a parking space ahead of time for an easier entrance, either through the Guardians or my friends at SpotHero.

Here’s the lowdown on popular parking options:

 

 
cleveland guardians parking gateway east garage

Having windows at the stairways is an underrated parking garage feature.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #3) Gateway East Garage. The closest thing to a main Guardians garage is the Gateway East garage, which is among the largest and most convenient, abutting Progressive Field on Larry Doby Way (formerly Eagle Avenue).

If you’re not overly concerned about the price, and it’s reasonable, this is as good a spot as any and not too far from the highways. The price is usually consistent regardless of opponent or what’s happening in the area, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t arrive earlier (and buy a pass beforehand) when an event is going on at Rocket Mortgage Field House, or on fireworks nights. The lower levels are reserved for employees of both venues, so you’ll be using the upper levels, but there is an elevator.

Very important note! In 2023, with construction in the downtown area, the Guardians have warned that there is a limited number of spaces in the Gateway East garage. When buying game tickets through the team, if there are spaces available, they will offer passes to you. If you’d like to park here, definitely get the pass!

All things considered, the Gateway East garage is probably the best parking spot at Progressive Field, especially if you’re a newbie.

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progressive field parking guide east 9th cleveland guardians

With a helpful picture of the ballpark on the sign!

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #4) East 9th Street Lots. If you want to be close to the ballpark and interstates, and don’t care about the price, the best bet is the lot on the corner of East 9th St. and Carnegie Avenue (G49 on Google Maps), or at the Hilton Garden Inn across the street. Both are across the street from the ballpark and exit easily onto I-90 or I-77. You will pay more for this privilege, however, at least as much as any other lot.

The parking lot at the Cross Country Mortgage building at the corner of East 9th and Bolivar might be slightly cheaper, and you can’t beat the convenience of being this close to the center field entrance and the amazing food selection in the ballpark.

There are a couple of lots just north of Bolivar on E. 9th, and they’re close too, but these will charge about as much as the closer lots to the interstate. You can go a couple blocks further north on E. 9th and usually find cheaper lots. After the game you can use the aforementioned route to I-90 via Superior Ave; Superior is U.S. 6/322 from E. 9th.

 

 
thirsty parrot cleveland guardians parking

Just hand over your cash to that guy sitting in the car there.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #5) Nearby Restaurants. There are several restaurants a short walk from Progressive Field with event parking spots nearby. These are higher in price than the Gateway East garage, but they are very convenient to the ballpark and these joints are known for being fun places to celebrate a Guardians victory. Both charge less earlier in the day, but they’ll kick you out or make you pay the event rate once the time comes.

Here’s a few links to restaurants near Progressive Field that have nearby lots, and their specialties (I’ve included the address of the parking lot, not the restaurant):

Thirsty Parrot (lot at 811 Bolivar Road) – Pre- and post-game parties, limited menu of burgers, sandwiches, and appetizers.

Headliner Bar & Eatery (lot at 501 Huron Road East) – Restaurant for the Hotel Indigo, high end tavern and dining.

Flannery’s Pub (lot at 2065 East 3rd Street) – Craft beers, handcrafted cocktails, burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Mabel’s BBQ is also close to this lot – Cleveland style BBQ (with Bertman’s mustard as a BBQ sauce ingredient), brisket, sandwiches and sides, beer and cocktails.

 

harry buffalo progressive field parking

Someone say hairy buffalo? Now I’m hungry!

Harry Buffalo (lot at 2118 East 4th Street) – Burgers, sandwiches, pizza, wings, tacos, and appetizers, and weekday specials. Primo African Quisine is also near this lot – Grilled lamb and seafood entrees, traditional African dishes, sandwiches and appetizers, craft beers and fancy drinks.

Clevelander Bar & Grill (lot at 750 Huron Road East) – Burgers, sandwiches, wings, and appetizers; beer and drinks.

Those are a few for you, but there’s plenty of bars and eateries in the area north of the ballpark; you can use these addresses when booking your parking on SpotHero.

 

 
tower city cleveland guardians parking

The parking garage is just a bonus.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #6) Tower City Garage. The Tower City center parking garage is a fair amount of walking from the ballpark, but the nice thing is that the walkway is indoors all the way from the Tower complex to the Cavs’ arena. The garage is located off of Huron Road.

Parking is cheaper here than nearby lots, it’s often good for all day, and you can spend some time in the Tower City shopping center. It’s also easier to get to the interstates after the game, especially since the crowd will be mostly cleared out by the time you get to the garage. Since the RTA public transit station is at Tower City, you’ll see plenty of baseball fans walking there after the game.

The other benefit of parking here is that there are a lot of eateries in Tower City; you can grab a cheaper bite or fill up your goody bag with less expensive food for the game. The Tower City garage is probably your best option for cheap parking at a Guardians game.

 

 
p[rogressive field parking st maron church

Even saints eventually end their shift.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #7) Other Lots. Carnegie Avenue has several convenient lots that are fairly reasonable. The Wolstein Center further east (home of Cleveland State University sports) has an affordable lot and is an easy exit onto I-90 from East 21st. This is about a 15-minute walk on a busy street, so it should be fine at night; just check that there isn’t an event happening there.

On Carnegie Avenue east of the ballpark is the St. Maron Catholic Church, which allows parking in its covered lot for non-Sunday games. The location is great, and it’s also an easy exit onto the highway. And what could be safer than having Jesus watch over your car? I’ve also mentioned the Hilton Garden Inn lot, which in some cases can be half the price of lots across the street. You can usually book these on SpotHero.

 

cleveland guardians parking halle garage

You literally can’t even be a tall person in this garage.

The Halle Garage on Huron Avenue is cheaper and a 5-minute walk, but it does get some poor reviews for its lack of space inside. There are other lots on East 14th St.; if you don’t mind passing by a cemetery at night. With the new ramp on East 14th, these should be an easier exit onto I-77.

North and east of the ballpark on St. Clair Avenue are close to a dozen lots that you can book very cheaply. These are about a mile from the ballpark though, and not in a great area. I would avoid these for a night game especially, even though they’re cheap.

 

progressive field parking guide unsafe spots

When they tell you what to do in the event of a break-in, it’s probably not a great spot.

Some of the lots in the Prospect/Bolivar/East 14th St. area, are also in less safe areas of downtown. I’ve read some reviews from folks whose cars were broken into, and you will frequently see orange signs imploring you to “put your junk in your trunk” (which I would think is obvious anywhere).

The lots are usually cheap, but if cheap means more to you than convenience, I would go for the lots east of the ballpark on Carnegie Avenue.

 

cleveland guardians parking jacks casino

Don’t buy into this. They still charge for parking.

The JACK Casino at Public Square charges for parking on game days; it’s not a good option and not any cheaper for the distance. The lot is open 24/7, if you’d like to enjoy some slots before or after the game. Parking is free for members or folks who play enough to earn points for it, but it will probably cost you more than it’s worth. I’ve read that it can be very slow exiting after games as well.

Ultimately remember that the most used highway ramps are from East 9th Street and Carnegie Avenue. Use any parking spot closer to another exit for an easier out.

 

 
cheap free street parking progressive field cleveland guardians

The trick is to just act like you do it all the time.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #8) Cheap Or Free Street Parking. You won’t find any place to park for free nearby on East 9th St. close to game time, but there are spots on side streets where you can park on the street at certain times.

On Prospect Avenue near the watering holes are metered spots which become free after 6:00 PM, so you can feed the meter cheaply until then. Many meters are inactive on weekends and holidays, so you could land a free spot for a weekend game if you’re early. The city bans a lot of street parking before playoff and high demand games.

Carnegie Avenue east of the ballpark also has parking on the street for free on evenings and weekends, and it’s a great spot, but you will need some good timing to land one of these for a ballgame.

 

downtown cleveland parking meter rates

I wish they would make up their minds.

On Huron Road East near Tower City there is parking that is free after 6:00; if you can’t find anything there, try the numbered streets like East 6th, north of the ballpark, or Chester Avenue off of East 9th. You can find some street parking on East 2nd Street for night games.

As always with street parking, be careful that you’re parking on the right side of the street, and that the regulations are clear on any applicable sign. If it’s confusing, it’s probably designed to be. And put your junk in your trunk.

 

 
flat iron cafe guardians shuttle

This is the way to go to a baseball game.

Progressive Field Parking, Tip #9) Guardians Game Shuttles. Ballpark E-Guides always goes the extra mile, so I’m adding a couple shuttle options you can use to save some cash. I highly recommend the first for a pre-game meal and drink:

Flat Iron Café The Flatty, as regulars call it, is an Irish pub located on Center Street near U.S. 6-20; they have a shuttle that I believe runs for all of the Guardians home games. Parking is free on the street after 6:00 PM and on weekends, or you can use a very inexpensive lot across the street. To use the shuttle, you have to spend a small amount in the restaurant.

The menu is Irish pub fare, burgers, sandwiches, wings, and appetizers like giant onion rings, fish and chips and potato skins. Good variety and prices are reasonable, and there’s beer of course. It draws a larger crowd on game nights; some Guardians fans use the shuttle regularly.

For the most part people who share opinions online think very highly of the Flatty. The location also makes it a much easier exit after the game, especially heading west.

As of this moment the Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Fatty Wagon isn’t running, but that may change. Drop a line if you hear anything.

 

RTA trolley cleveland guardians

Because a smile doesn’t cost anything!

RTA Trolleys RTA has two free downtown trolleys—the E-Line and B-Line—that have stops at Tower City; they are free to ride but are available only during the day on weekdays.

If you can score some free parking near a trolley stop on a weekday, it’s a nice deal, but again, this is only for weekday games, of which there aren’t many. The Guardians and the city do often suggest the use of trolleys for Opening Day, though, should you be lucky enough to attend. Not a bad idea considering that most nearby lots will be full and expensive.

 

cleveland guardians game parking

If you can’t find the ballpark from here, I don’t know what to tell you.

There you have it my friends…your complete and handy guide for parking at Progressive Field to see your Cleveland Guardians. I hope this was helpful to you…and be sure to read my Progressive Field guide for lots more great Guardians baseball game tips!

Oh…and be sure to Follow Ballpark E-Guides on Facebook for more great tips for your next ballpark visit!

Thanks for reading, and please support our sponsors!

Planning a trip to Cleveland? Save a bunch of money on hotels, flights and rental cars…book your trip with my friends at Hotwire! (It’s still Kurt’s favorite!)

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Click here to start booking your trip to Cleveland and Progressive Field today!

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5 Milwaukee Brewers Parking Tips | American Family Field

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning a trip to a Milwaukee Brewers home game, or even if you’re a regular at American Family Field, here are some essential Brewers parking tips. There’s some valuable info here you should know…most importantly, that American Family Field is a very big tailgating destination. (More about that here.)

Here are five helpful tips for parking for Brewers game days, after a quick word from our sponsor:

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american family field parking tips milwaukee brewers

Try to get here before all of these nice people do.

American Family Field Parking Tip #1) Arrive as early as you can. All of the lots open three hours prior to the game. You’ll see a long line of cars waiting for the parking gates to open, as Brewers fans itch to fire up the grill. One reason to get there early, other than joining the party, is to keep from sitting in your car for too long.

The American Family Field parking lots have over 12,000 spaces. For most games, you shouldn’t have a problem landing a parking spot. But if you want a decent spot, less walking and a lesser wait, you will need to get there about three hours or more prior to game time. For prime games like Opening Day or against the Chicago Cubs, you’ll need to get there sooner than that.

 

helfaer field american family field brewers

And because you’re early, you can get a good seat!

There’s things to do, outside of drinking beer, grilling sausages or throwing frisbees, to keep yourself or the kids busy before the first pitch. If you’re a baseball history buff, see the statues for Hank Aaron, Robin Yount, Bud Selig, and Bob Uecker. In Brewers Lot 1, the Brewers marked the spot where Hank Aaron’s 755th home run landed. There’s also a memorial to three workers who lost their lives in the 1999 crane collapse during the ballpark’s construction.

Helfaer Field is a baseball field near the main entrance of the ballpark, on the footprint of old County Stadium. There’s usually activity going on you can watch, and a kids playground nearby. Or obviously you can join the tailgating party. It beats sitting in your car waiting for the long line.

 

milwaukee brewers preferred parking

Parking at the Hot Corner? Heck yes!

American Family Field Parking Tip #2) Book your parking in advance (and spring for preferred parking lots). The Brewers have a colorful parking map on their website. Their parking lots are named after Brewers greats like Yount, Molitor, Thomas and others.

Milwaukee Brewers parking is relatively inexpensive by baseball standards, although it is pricier for weekend and Marquee games. For a few extra dollars, you can get a preferred spot. As of 2023, general parking rates range from $13 to $40. Preferred parking passes especially are significantly cheaper when you order in advance.

Most of the Preferred lots are just off of I-94, and surround Helfaer Field and the home plate entrance. They also include the Miller and Gantner lots off of 44th Street. Preferred parking is closer to the ballpark, with easier access to I-94 afterward. Most fans will tell you it’s worth the few extra bucks.

The Molitor lot is usually an easier exit than the Yount or Uecker lots. Use the Aaron or Thomas lot to be close to the home plate gate.

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Order your caps, jerseys, and more now at MLBShop.com and save!

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milwaukee brewers parking american family field

Welcome to the grand parking lots!

If you’re not in a preferred lot, you’ll likely have to walk on a pedestrian bridge to cross either the Menomonee River or I-94, and it’s a fair bit of walking. There’s nothing wrong with the scenery though—at the foot of the bridge crossing I-94 are blocks of Brewers history, and crossing the Menomonee passes by the Sausage Haus and tailgate pavilions.

Like the Uecker seats inside the ballpark, there’s also a Uecker Lot. It’s in the southeast corner of the cheaper lots, and it is probably the furthest from the park. If you have mobility troubles, you can use a shuttle service that the Brewers provide; call their Guest Relations hotline.

For groups on a bus or RV, the American Family Lot just south of the ballpark is dedicated for bus parking. It costs a chunk of change, but again, you can order parking in advance at a significant discount. The oversized vehicles lot does not have tailgating grids, but people still party there.

 

Milwaukee brewers motorcycle parking

The home of Harley-Davidson has to have a motorcycle parking lot at their ballpark.

If you need accessible parking spaces, they’re in the preferred lots close to the home plate entrance. Motorcyclists can park in the Cooper lot near Helfaer Field.

Finally, while there is free parking on streets around the American Family Field area, it’s a ways from the ballpark. For free street parking at Brewers games, your best bet is probably north of the ballpark on Blue Mound Road, or the side streets off of Blue Mound.

If you don’t want to do the walk, you can use one of the tavern shuttle services, like from Kelly’s Bleachers. (You can read about a few of those here.)

 

American family field alternate routes

This is a lot of info to digest in a few seconds. Best to plan ahead.

American Family Field Parking Tip #3) Use the right route. American Family Field is so essential Milwaukee that it has its very own interchange, exit 308B directly off of I-94, called Stadium Way/Brewers Boulevard (formerly Miller Park Way). Stadium Way is only called such near the ballpark; north of I-94 it is U.S. Route 41, and if you go far enough south it becomes 43rd Street.

The roads circling the lots are Selig Drive to the north and Frederick Miller Way to the south; these driveways are accessible from several other roads in the area. Some of the connecting roads are one-way, inward before and outward after the game.

The Brewers provide directions on their website from each locality, from Green Bay to Chicago. They all end with getting to I-94 and exiting at the ballpark. Which is fine, but know that most everyone drives to American Family Field, and most of them use I-94. As I’ve said, if you’re not early enough, you could run into some traffic backups.

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american family field alternate route

Because life rewards those on the road less traveled.

Skip this bit if you use Google Maps or another GPS and know where you’re going…but here’s a few alternate routes if you’re behind schedule:

– Coming from west on I-94, get off one exit early at 308A. (The exit is on the left side of the highway.) At the end of the ramp, turn right on Gen. Mitchell/Parkway Drive, which ends at Frederick Miller Way and the west lots.

– Coming from west or east, U.S. Route 18 runs parallel to I-94 north of the park; it is Blue Mound Road on the west side before it merges with Wisconsin Avenue to the east. From Blue Mound just west of Brewers Way, you can turn onto N. Story Parkway and then make a left onto Yount Drive. From Yount Drive you can quickly enter the less expensive Molitor lot, or take it to Selig Drive and the north preferred lots. Very few people use Yount Drive to get to the preferred lots, so you should have little waiting time.

You can also use General Mitchell Boulevard from Blue Mound, which ends at Fred Miller Way as described above.

– From the south or Mitchell Airport, try I-894/I-43 (the Airport Freeway) and exit at Loomis Road/WI-36 north. Turn left onto Loomis and make an immediate left onto 43rd St. 43rd becomes Stadium Way with not too much traffic.

– Coming from points east (including I-43), use Canal Street, which runs parallel to I-94. Canal Street leads directly to the ballpark (often with less traffic than I-94), where it turns into Fred Miller Way at the cheaper lots entrance. This is often an easier exit too.

– From the north on I-41, you can bypass the I-94 interchange and instead use I-43 south of the ballpark; from there you can exit at 43rd St./Stadium Way; you can enter via the easier-to-exit south lots.

One more thing: construction is frequent in Wisconsin. Pay attention to alerts if you can on the Wisconsin Department of Transportation website or @BernieBrewer.

 

Milwaukee brewers parking tailgating

They don’t mess around in Milwaukee.

American Family Field Parking Tip #4) Bring your tailgating supplies. You’ll want to participate in the tailgating. Smelling all of the sausages cooking will make you ravenous.

I’ve written a separate post about the amazing tailgating scene and what you should know, but this is just a reminder to bring supplies. People in discussion forums asking about Brewers games are told to get a disposable grill, charcoal and some Johnsonville, Usinger’s or Klement’s brats.

If you aren’t a tailgating pro (don’t worry; you’ll be surrounded by them), there are several places to find minimal survival equipment.

There is a Metcalfe’s Market on State Street north of the park that is a popular place to get brats. You can stop by Cousins Subs on Wisconsin Avenue or George Webb on Greenfield Avenue for sandwiches. There are a few more takeout joints south of the ballpark on Stadium Way/43rd Street.

The Milwaukee Public Market is a five minute drive away, and features lots of great stuff from local vendors. You can park there for free for a half hour if you can pick up your stuff fast.

Coming from Chicago on I-94, there is a Mars Cheese Castle tourist type of store in Kenosha that has any kind of links, cheese and snacks you need. Love that place…lots of great eats.

 

american family field parking tips

You have to let the racing sausages go by. Just saying.

American Family Field Parking Tip #5) Keep your eyes open when leaving. The tailgating party often continues after the game, as the lots gradually empty. People do sometimes leave grills (and other unmentionable stuff) out in the parking lot. On your way out it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for both people and equipment. The Brewers clear the lot an hour after the game.

Should your car fail to start after the game or if you lock your keys in it, MT Towing & Recovery will do their best to help you out free of charge, although you’ll have to spring for towing or repairs. Contact a police officer or Brewers Guest Relations (414-902-4900).

 

Milwaukee brewers guest relations

Ain’t nothing wrong with Guest Relations. Guest Relations is a beautiful thing.

Finally, if you’ve had a few too many and shouldn’t drive home, you can call the Brewers’ Guest Relations. They’ll order a cab ride for you if they see the need. Whether they’ll let you leave their car in the lot, you’d have to ask them. It is against Brewers policy, but they might allow it if you ask nicely and get your car out of there before the next game.

There you go my friends; hopefully that helps you in your next trip…remember, when it comes to attending Brewers games, preparation is everything!

 

Need More American Family Field – Milwaukee Brewers Game Tips?

If you need more help for your next visit to the home of the Milwaukee Brewers, check out my tips for newbies here, some helpful info on choosing a seat here and here, and some party areas and shuttles to the game.

Thanks for reading and supporting our sponsors, and feel free to drop me a line with any questions!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

How To Get To Yankee Stadium – Best Visitor’s Guide

Posted by Kurt Smith

New York City being the nub of world activity that it is, there are plenty of ways to get to Yankee Stadium, all with their advantages and disadvantages. If you’re a newbie, the MTA subway or Metro-North railroad is the easiest and best way to get to Yankee Stadium. Taking your car can be done, but driving a car in NYC is not for the faint of heart, and you won’t like parking prices.

So I’ll start with your public transit options, but I’ll cover everything else too. (Need more Yankee Stadium help? Learn how to choose a great seat, what to eat at the game, and some tips for newbies on this site!)

There’s a lot of valuable info here, so I’m breaking it down for you:

From Manhattan, Brooklyn + NYC Boroughs: MTA Subway
From Northern NYC Suburbs and Connecticut: Metro-North Rail
Connecting From Long Island: LIRR
Connecting From New Jersey: NJ Transit Rail + Bus
Arriving By Car + Parking
From Other NYC Boroughs, Part 2: MTA Bus
From Other Cities: Amtrak + Megabus
Using Taxicab, Uber + Rideshares (And Why You Shouldn’t)
Arriving By Bicycle
Ways To Save Money Getting To Yankee Stadium

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how to get to yankee stadium MTA subway metro-north

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How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Manhattan and NYC Boroughs, Part 1: MTA Subway.

The MTA (Metropolitan Transit Authority) B and D trains on the west side of Manhattan, and the 4 train on the east side, all stop right at the Yankees – East 161st Street Station, at the Hard Rock Cafe entrance. All three train lines extend through Manhattan and Brooklyn, and connect with the rest of the extensive NYC subway system. Coming from Manhattan, the Bronx is always an “Uptown” train.

You should not have to transfer more than once from anywhere in the city, and most transfers are within the subway station and free. Trains get very crowded on game days, adding more fans with each stop, so your chances of having a seat on the ride improve if you get on further south of Grand Central or Times Square.

B trains only operate on weekdays and stop at Yankee Stadium during rush hour. D trains will stop at Yankee Stadium on weekends, but do not stop at the Stadium during rush hour (I have read accounts that it does on game nights, but the MTA doesn’t publicize this).

Here’s a trick for you: going to the game from Manhattan, if you use the express D instead of the B, you can get off at Tremont Avenue and then take a B or a D back–either will stop at Yankee Stadium. You’ll probably have a seat on the ride, and it actually could be a little quicker. (This also works if the D zooms by the Stadium.)

 

lexington avenue line yankees game

“See that building over there? That’s it.”

The 4 (Lexington Avenue Line) is an express until the late evening when it stops everywhere, so if the game ends late plan for a long trip back, but the 4 always stops at Yankee Stadium. I prefer the 4 for another very good reason…it emerges from underground just before the Yankee Stadium station, so you get a sweet view of the ballpark. I’ll walk a few blocks to get to a 4 for that.

After the game, there WILL be a large crowd waiting for trains. You may have to wait a couple of trains to get on one, but there’s no need to wait for an express train. Also, definitely get your added value MetroCard in advance, and avoid the lines buying tickets after the game.

New York’s subway system is perfectly safe everywhere, so long as you use basic common sense. There are always plenty of riders, and if you get lost, which is not hard to do, you can always ask someone. Trains run 24/7/365.

 

 
Metro North Train Coming

Featuring fans actually sitting down on the way to the game!

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Northern Suburbs and Connecticut: The Metro-North Railroad.

To celebrate the opening of the new Stadium, MTA built a Metro-North railroad stop a short walk from the venue, with game day service on rail lines that extend into the northern suburbs and Connecticut. The Hudson, Harlem and New Haven lines all stop at Yankee Stadium – East 153rd Street Station on game days.

Most Metro-North stations have free or inexpensive parking, especially on weekends, but not all of them do. Some of them, like Tarrytown, will charge on game days. (Tip: You can book parking near a station with SpotHero!)

Metro-North runs game day service from directly to the Stadium on the Hudson Line, and there is a shuttle train that runs from both Grand Central Terminal and the Harlem 125th St. stations in Manhattan. It’s a quick 16 minute ride from midtown, and these are far less crowded trains than the MTA lines.

Much like the LIRR to Citi Field, Metro-North a MUCH more pleasant ride than the subway, and it’s well worth the few extra bucks. The Hudson Line is particularly popular for its Hudson River scenery on the way to the city.

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metro north railroad how to get to yankee stadium

Unfortunately you do still need tickets.

A peak time travel ticket is required between 4:00 and 8:00 PM, but traveling on the New Haven or Harlem lines you can buy an off-peak travel ticket while transferring to the shuttle. Tickets are cheaper when bought in advance.

Extra trains run after the game, so no need to worry about extra innings, but don’t dilly-dally too much. The last post-game train leaves 45 minutes after the last out.

The MTA website contains more detailed info, such as where connecting services are and which train is the last to leave. They call the game day trains “Yankee Clippers”.

So those are the main rail routes to get to Yankee Stadium; here’s a bit about some connecting services:

 

 
How to get to yankee stadium from long island lirr

Even the Mets will point you to how to get to Yankee Stadium!

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Long Island: Long Island Railroad.

From Long Island, most all lines of the LIRR eventually connect to Penn Station or Grand Central Station. From Grand Central you can use Metro-North or a 4 train.

From Penn it’s a short walk to 34th Street-Herald Square and a B or D train to Yankee Stadium. You can also use an A or C train from Penn and transfer to the B/D at 59th (from the A, you can switch at 145th for a quicker ride), or take the 2 to 149th St./Grand Concourse, and transfer there to a 4.

It’s usually better to use the Herald Square, since the 4 will be crowded by 149th, and 149th isn’t the prettiest of stations from what I’ve read.

As with the Metro-North Railroad, LIRR tickets are cheaper bought in advance than on board.

 

 
How to get to yankee stadium from new jersey

If there’s one thing New Jersey excels at, it’s helping you get out of New Jersey!

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From New Jersey: NJ Transit.

From New Jersey, riders can get to Yankee Stadium using the NJ Transit trains to Penn Station, where you can follow the Long Island Railroad directions just described. Coming back, the last train leaves Penn Station at about 1:00 AM.

NJ Transit also circulates several buses from suburbs and park-and-ride stations to the Port Authority Terminal, where an A or C train can be taken to the B/D at 59th Street. The North Bergen and other park-and-rides are packages with parking and the round trip ride included, and it’s considerably cheaper than actually driving into the city, especially for one or two people. There are several budget hotels nearby for out-of-town visitors.

Buses should run late enough to get you back, but check the schedules. I barely made the last bus one night coming from an extra-inning Mets game.

 

 
Ruppert Garage Yankee Stadium

The real PITA of driving to Yankee Stadium is that you have to park your own car.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, By Car + Parking:

The only interstate highway that borders Yankee Stadium is I-87, also called the Major Deegan Expressway. Most routes to the Stadium use the Deegan; traffic obviously gets worse on game days. Access to the Stadium can be at Exits 3-4 northbound and 5-7 southbound; unless you’re very early you’ll likely slow to a crawl no matter which exit you use.

The Yankees provide directions from all of the boroughs, Westchester, Long Island, New Jersey and Connecticut on their website. If you arrive early enough, traffic and parking isn’t too bad at all, but after the game it can be rough exiting.

There’s a lot you should know about driving to the Stadium, especially where to park…so if you’re trying this, check out my extensive Yankee Stadium parking guide, with alternate routes, pluses and minuses of various spots, and even some free street parking you can use.

But my #1 piece of advice, as always, is to book your parking lot beforehand, and my friends at SpotHero are a big help. (My #2 piece of advice…arrive as early as you can, preferably at least two hours before the first pitch.)

Never Drive To Yankee Stadium Without A Plan…

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how to get to yankee stadium by bus

Keep in mind that the bus driver won’t be using any shortcuts.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Manhattan + Other Boroughs, Part 2: MTA Bus.

NYC buses are considerably slower than trains and aren’t the most pleasant of rides. The only reason I can think of to ride the bus is if you want a view of the city. But I’m adding this just in case.

The MTA Bx6 and Bx13 routes drop riders off directly on the corner of 161st and River Avenue, right at the front door of Yankee Stadium. The Bx1 and Bx2 from stop at 161st and the Grand Concourse near the ballpark, as does the express BxM4 from Midtown.

The Bx6 runs all day and all night, but after 1:00 AM there is about an hour wait between buses. The Bx13 picks up fans after the game until about 1:00 AM, so you should be safe. Use a MetroCard or exact change to ride an MTA bus. You can find the routes for the buses on MTA’s website.

There are also express buses that run from other boroughs to Manhattan, where you can use a subway train to the game:

From Brooklyn, the X28, X29, BM2, and BM3 run to Grand Central Station where you grab a 4 or a Metro-North train.

From Queens, the QM1, QM1A, QM2, QM2A and QM4 buses run on 34th Street in Manhattan to several locations where you can get on a B, D, or 4 train.

Again, the routes and schedules are on MTA’s website. Bus to subway transfers are free.

 

 
amtrak to nyc baseball

Okay, let’s not get carried away here. No one’s paying $1,200 a ticket to ride on Amtrak.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium, From Other Cities: Amtrak + Megabus.

If you’re using Amtrak to get to a Yankees game, there are a bunch of services that stop at Penn Station; from there you can get on the B or D to Yankee Stadium.

Amtrak isn’t the cheapest way to get to the game, but it’s not a bad option for, say, visiting Orioles fans who want to get back to Baltimore without staying overnight. That ride is under three hours most times, which isn’t bad at all, especially knowing you can avoid I-95 traffic and NYC congestion.

 

megabus NYC

Well, when they are in service, they’re pretty good. Just saying.

If you’re saving cash, Megabus is a low cost bus service that drop riders off in a couple of locations in midtown Manhattan. They run buses from several nearby major metropolises, including from Boston and Philadelphia. If you book the ride early enough (as in several months ahead of time) you can ride from Philadelphia or Boston to New York for $1, but even the regular fare is still a big savings over gas, tolls and parking.

Megabus drops you off in midtown Manhattan; from there it’s probably a two train subway ride depending on where you are…the destination address changes from time to time. As I write this it’s close to the 34th Street-Hudson Yards Station…from there you can take the 7 to Grand Central and then get on the 4. (By the way, it’s a single train ride to Citi Field from there.)

Megabus has saved me a ton of cash (I once went from NYC to Boston and back for $2.50 round trip) and they’re comfortable as buses go.

 

 
how to get to yankee stadium taxi uber lyft

Safely, sure. Quickly, I wouldn’t bet on it even with someone else driving.

How To Get To Yankee Stadium: Taxicab + Ride Sharing.

Taking a cab in New York City is expensive and an ill-advised method of getting to or from Yankee Stadium, but if you need one after the game, you can head to Gate 2 or Gate 4 where there is a car service dispatch. You’ll need it. I saw a few drivers in front of Babe Ruth Plaza, but they took off when I tried to take their picture, so they may not be allowed to hang out there.

If you’re arriving in a cab or Lyft or Uber vehicle, it’s a good idea to ask your driver to drop you off on Jerome Avenue on the opposite side of the Stadium from the B-D-4 madness. There is an Uber pickup area at Jerome and Anderson Avenues.

Word of warning about using a rideshare or taxi, and why I don’t recommend it. While you might be okay without spending an arm and a leg coming to the game, with everyone leaving afterwards there is a LOT of congestion. Getting a ride not only might take a while, but it will cost you mucho dinero leaving the game through the traffic. There’s much easier and cheaper ways to get to Yankee Stadium…as I’ve demonstrated here!

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how to get to yankee stadium bicycle

No, this isn’t the guy you pay to watch your bike. At least I don’t think he is. But he isn’t likely to steal it either.

Unusual Ways To Get To Yankee Stadium: By Bicycle.

The New York City Department of Transportation has a bicycling map of New York City available, or you can get one in any local bicycle store. You shouldn’t have any problem locking up your bike, since the Yankees have enough bicycle racks for 160 bikes. Whether you trust leaving your bicycle here is up to you…most people say if you have a solid lock it will be fine. I have read accounts from people who offer a few bucks to bouncers at Stan’s Sports Bar to watch their bike.

The Bronx isn’t the best of neighborhoods, so if you do this for a night game, you should probably take the subway back afterwards; use the first or last car on the train and be prepared to wait for a few cars before one has the space.

I’ve seen some bicycle paths along the Grand Concourse and such, but closing in on game time crowds around the Stadium get pretty large, so you may end up hopping off as you get closer.

 

 
how to save money at yankee stadium getting there

At Ballpark E-Guides, we don’t do $50 parking.

Some Ways To Save Money Getting To Yankee Stadium

Thanks for sticking with me this far! Here’s a few Tightwad Tips to help you save money getting to the ballpark:

$ – All MTA services feature discounts for seniors, disabled, active duty military and children; three kids under 44 inches tall can ride free with an adult. If you’re in NYC for a few days, a 7-Day Pass will pay for itself in 12 rides (easily done).

$ – The LIRR and Metro-North offer a weekend deal called the CityTicket, for travel at a discounted rate within the city limits. Makes it only slightly more expensive to travel on a much nicer and quicker train coming from, say, Queens.

$ – If you can swing it, try to use the LIRR or Metro-North during off-peak hours (before 4:00 PM on weeknights), where the fare is significantly less.

$ – There are multiple discounts on the NJ Transit website for military members, senior citizens, children of a certain age, etc., so check it out and see if you qualify. Two kids with an adult can ride free on weekends.

Again, if you’re coming by car and looking to save money, consult my Ultimate Yankee Stadium Parking Guide…lots of useful tips there!

 

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And now, you can race me to Yankee Stadium!

So there you go baseball fans…everything you need to know about how to get to Yankee Stadium. If you need more Yankee Stadium help, I’ve got you covered…check out this detailed guide for finding the best seats, the full details about Yankee Stadium food, and even some tips for bringing food into the ballpark. Helpful stuff before you get your Yankees tickets!

Or just check out my complete Yankee Stadium guide here, and if you’re on a baseball trip to NYC, be sure to read my very helpful guide for Citi Field too!

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5 Best Comerica Park Parking Tips | Detroit Tigers

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning a trip to District Detroit for a Tigers game, and need help picking out the best Comerica Park parking spot for your budget and taste, I’m here to help. There is ample parking in the area for baseball games, including official parking areas, off-site garages, and even street parking, but you should have a plan.

So then, as your unofficial Comerica Park parking guide, I’m offering five useful suggestions for parking at Detroit Tigers games. But first, a quick bit of advice from our sponsor…if you’d like to look further beyond my suggestions here, see below to order a parking pass with my friends at SpotHero!

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Comerica Park Parking Lots + Garages – 5 Suggestions:

comerica park parking detroit tigers garage

It’s not the D Garage as in a letter grade. It’s actually a good spot.

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #1) Tigers Garage (250 Fisher Road). The Tigers garages are located north of the ballpark, and are among the most expensive parking facilities. These lots fill up quickly on game days, with folks who are uncomfortable leaving their car in downtown Detroit or don’t want to walk much. There is a pedestrian bridge to the suite entrances here.

The team has built the five-story McLaren Garage (90 E. Fisher Service Drive) next the Tiger Garage, replacing Lot 3; it has 900 parking spaces on several levels, with indoor stairways and an elevator. There are also outdoor lots both on Montcalm and right in front of the main entrance with a few spaces; the Tigers charge the same for these lots.

The nice thing about the Tigers / Olympia Development lots is that if you need your car jump started after the game or you locked your keys in it, the attendant will either help you or contact AAA. No tailgating though.

 

comerica park parking ford field

Even indoors, the Lions still play in any weather.

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #2) Ford Field. There is premium parking in Lots 4 and 5 on the I-75 side of Ford Field, with tailgating allowed even, which isn’t found in many local lots. These lots are the same high price as the Tigers Garage next door and offers an easy out back onto I-75.

But there is also the cheaper and lesser known Ford Field parking deck (1902 St. Antoine) located on the west side of the stadium—that for some reason the Tigers do not point out on their parking page. This isn’t a bad deal at all; it’s cheaper than prime lots that are just as close to the ballpark.

Another nice thing about it is that you can actually walk through the impressive football stadium on the inside to get to the ballpark, and there are even some food stands there. You can’t walk through the stadium to get back, but you’ll pass by some cool bucket drummers after the game.

 

comerica park parking fox theatre

Lions with Wings…get it?

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #3) Fox Theatre Garage (50 W. Montcalm Street). The garage next door to the Fox Theatre is a short walk to the main entrance. It is slightly less than the Tigers lots, but there are better deals just west of (behind) it—the Tigers run lots for half the price are only a couple of blocks away. The Fox garage can be slow to exit; you may want to have a bite at nearby Hockeytown Café first.

Years ago I parked in the Fox garage before 3:00 PM on a game night and paid just $2 for the whole day; in my last visit the early bird price was $5 and the nice lady said yes, you can leave your car there through the game. I love that trick: you can park early in the morning or afternoon, jump on the People Mover or the QLine along Woodward Avenue, and visit some Detroit attractions during the day (like Z’s Villa for pizza). And after the game your car is right there.

If there’s something happening at the Fox, they will occasionally hold the spots only for Fox customers, which I assume means you have to show your ticket to the event. Probably a good idea to check beforehand.

One more cool thing about the Fox…it’s close to the right field entrance of Comerica, which is the main gate and features all of the cool tigers statues.

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detroit tigers game day parking gem theater garage

A hidden gem for Tigers game day parking. Just don’t stand there!

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #4) Gem Theater Garage (1910 Brush Street). The Gem garage is located off of Brush Street southeast of the ballpark, next to the Elwood Bar & Grill. It’s a hidden gem, pun intended. This is kind of tucked into the area, so if you’re using it, get here well before the first pitch.

The price for this lot varies, but it’s usually less than the Tigers lots or Fox lot and is a pretty good deal for its proximity to the park (Elwood brags that they are 56 steps away from Comerica, and the Gem is right next door). Great if you like a post-game party at Elwood’s, which a lot of Tigers fans do, and that’s a good idea since with its location it can take longer to exit.

 

comerica park parking greektown

You can’t miss the sign with it being all neon-y and all.

Comerica Park Parking, Tip #5) Greektown Casino Garage (1001 Brush Street). Greektown is accessible from the E. Lafayette St. exit off of I-375. The Greektown Casino used to offer free parking if you had your ticket validated; from there you could walk about three blocks to the ballpark or use the People Mover to and from Grand Circus Park station. If you exit on Brush Street, you can see the ballpark from the street.

The official policy for Tigers parking is that it’s free if you get your card validated and accumulate a certain number of points (which means losing some money in the casino), but if you get there early enough you might slide for free as I did twice in my last visit, especially on a weekday. At worst you’ll pay a small fee to park in an attended garage. If you’re concerned, you can book this on SpotHero ahead of time.

Greektown has some great restaurants and the casino itself, so it’s not short on entertainment before or after the game. There are also a couple of nearby taverns that will shuttle you to the game. I recommend having a plan for passing some time if there’s a big crowd at the game though, there have been numerous complaints about the wait getting out.

I have heard stories that Greektown isn’t the safest place at night, and it is a bit of a walk that might make you uncomfortable. But for day games, I think this may be the best deal.

 

There’s five suggestions for choosing a parking spot at your next Detroit Tigers game…but there are plenty more official parking lots, where you can reserve parking with SpotHero.

These are parking options I’ve used or seen in my past trips to Detroit, but again, my best advice is this: book your spot in advance, and have a backup plan. (You can also use another method of transit, or try one of the numerous Comerica Park shuttles!)

Interested in finding out more about visiting the beautiful home of the Detroit Tigers? Check out my Comerica Park page here! (And thanks for supporting Ballpark E-Guides sponsors!)

Planning a trip to Detroit? Save a bunch of money on hotels, flights and rental cars…book your trip with my friends at Hotwire! (It’s still Kurt’s favorite!)

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3 Cheap Spots for Great American Ball Park Parking

Posted by Kurt Smith

There isn’t any shortage of close and convenient Great American Ball Park parking for Reds games (and other events); the home of the Reds is among the easiest to reach by automobile or other means. I’ve looked into this quite a bit, and I have my three favorite spots, each very affordable and with its own advantages.

But first, a valuable and applicable bit of advice from our friends at SpotHero

Never drive to a Great American Ball Park without a plan…

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findlay market Cincinnati great american ball park parking

Reachable by streetcar, and features outstanding Belgian waffles.

Great American Ball Park Parking, Tip #1: Park early at the ballpark and make a day of Cincinnati. The Broadway and a couple of other lots are literally right there at the ballpark, but they don’t start charging the game rate until later in the day, so if you’re early enough you can park there for the day for a fraction of the event cost.

And now with the new and inexpensive Cincinnati streetcar, you can very cheaply visit some great local attractions like Findlay Market. (Belgian waffles!)

 

great american ball park parking newport

Baseball and sea otters…without having to move your car!

Great American Ball Park Parking, Tip #2: Park in Newport, KY. The Newport-On-The-Levee garage is cheap, and it’s near a full-blown entertainment center with everything from a movie theater and an aquarium and lots of great eateries.

And multiple ways to get to the ballpark…you can take a lengthy but scenic stroll across the Purple People Bridge, or use the inexpensive Southbank Shuttle to GABP’s front door…or even take a boat from the waterfront restaurants. Great if you’re bringing the kids or impressing a date.

 

Southbank Shuttle Covington Reds games

A cheap if rickety ride from a free parking spot.

Great American Ball Park Parking Tip #3: Park in Covington, KY. Covington is nowhere near the entertainment destination that Newport is, but this can be a good thing…it’s more than simple enough to find a free spot, either near the Roebling Bridge for another scenic walk (and not as lengthy as the walk from Newport) or a Southbank Shuttle station for a cheap ride.

There are some nice watering holes with outdoor dining here, like the Keystone Bar & Grill…which will give you shuttle tokens with their outstanding mac and cheese.

 

There’s three great and inexpensive options for different tastes for parking at Great American Ball Park, and I hope you find them useful. But there are lots of great ways to get to the home of the Reds…here’s more about that Southbank Shuttle.

Like seeing these helpful tips? Learn some more great advice for your next Reds game here, and be sure to Follow Ballpark E-Guides on Facebook for lots of money-saving and valuable hacks at your favorite ballpark!

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5 American Family Field Tailgating Tips – Milwaukee Brewers

Posted by Kurt Smith

There is no pre-game party in baseball like the American Family Field tailgating. It’s not even close.

There’s a decent amount of grilling in the parking lot of Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, and things seem to be growing at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia a bit. But nowhere is the tailgating every bit a baseball institution as natural grass the way it is at a Brewers game.

So after this quick word from our sponsor, we’ll get started!

My friends at TickPick have Brewers tickets…they offer a best price guarantee, a buyer’s trust guarantee, and NO service fees. Sounds like a no-brainer to me!

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visiting american family field shuttle

Clearly this guy is a VIP.

If you’re headed to Milwaukee to see the Brewers, you should take part in it, because walking through the huge parking lots, the smell of coal and brats is going to make you ravenous.

So as a public service, I’m offering five important tips for tailgaters at American Family Field. If I miss an important one, by all means contact me and let me know, but these five should at least help you avoid a tailgating fail.

american family field tailgating bratwursts

I hope it’s enough…

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #1: Boil Your Brats Beforehand. The American Family Field lots open three hours before game time, which is a good amount of time for tailgating, but not a lot if you’re cooking raw meat on the grill that took you a few minutes to fire up.

So get your Usinger’s or Johnsonville brats beforehand, and boil them in beer and water the night before—a beer for every two brats, with maybe some onion and red pepper for extra taste. It takes a while—I’ve read an hour, but I’ve cooked sausages in 20 minutes, so decide for yourself.

Once you’ve boiled the brats to a gray color, all that will be needed is to brown them on the grill at the ballpark, which takes significantly less time in an environment where people will be finding bricks appetizing.

In fact, prepare everything you can the night before, like slicing cheese and putting food into containers or footballs in the car. Hey, I told you Brewers fans take this seriously. Being prepared for a Brewers tailgate takes some work.

 

secret stadium sauce polish

It’s like a zingy BBQ sauce. But different.

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #2: Bring Secret Stadium Sauce. OK, not everyone loves the most popular condiment in Milwaukee. It’s not even necessarily for you. You can bring sauerkraut, Kopp’s deli mustard, even ketchup, but a nearby tailgater might have forgotten the Secret Stadium Sauce, or you may come across a first-time visitor to American Family Field who wants to know what the fuss is about with the Sauce.

Secret Stadium Sauce is usually available in most supermarkets in the Milwaukee area; it’s also available in the Team Shop, which opens when the parking lots do in case of an emergency. You can also order it on Amazon.

Don’t know what the Secret Stadium Sauce is? Check it out here.

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American Family Field tailgating tailgate town sign

It’s all about cheaper beer.

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #3: Arrive EARLY. I’ve already said that Brewers fans take their tailgating seriously, and that the lots open three hours before game time. Add the two together and the sum is a long line of cars in line at most of the gates, especially for the cheaper lots. These are people itching to get their tent and grill set up and will arrive an hour before the lots open to be the first ones in.

Most people don’t pre-pay to get in to the lots, so attendants are making change for most of them. Bring a book to read if you must while you’re waiting, but try to get to American Family at least a half an hour before the lots open.

 

American Family Field tailgating leinies

Yes, it’s a Miller product…now.

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #4: Drink Miller Products, But Don’t Imbibe Too Much After The First Hour. Many Brewers fans insist on Miller products vs. the Budweiser Empire that has helped fund 11 World Series titles for the division rival Cardinals. I at least would recommend taking a step up to Leinenkugel’s, a Chippewa Falls brewery that is now distributed by Miller. Needless to say, have plenty of ice.

But whatever your preference, make sure that you get the majority of beer consumption out of the way early. The parking lots at American Family Field have an ample amount of port-a-potties to accommodate tailgaters’ needs, but once that parking lot is filled with beer drinkers an hour before the game, lines will form.

And waiting in line for relief after four beers can make a minute seem like an hour. We’ve all been there. Don’t be at Level Ten with three other people just as full in front of you.

 

American Family Field tailgating lot

And this is just the preferred lot!

American Family Field Tailgating, Tip #5: Put A Window Flag On Your Car. This is a common tradition at Brewers games. Not only will it help you find your car (which, if you need help with, maybe you shouldn’t be driving), but you can also let people know that you’re a proud fan of the Timbler-Rattlers, Harley-Davidson, or Matt Kenseth. (I know that last one is obscure. Matt Kenseth is a NASCAR driver from Wisconsin. Yes, NASCAR’s still around.)

Needless to say, it should be unique…it’s okay to have a Brewers flag, of course, but that won’t necessarily make you stand out in the American Family Field parking lot.

Those are the five American Family Field tailgating tips that I consider most important, although obviously there’s other things to know…like that the Brewers will provide a taxicab ride home if you’ve had too much to drink, or that AAA of Wisconsin will give you a free tow if you can’t get your car started, or that you need to be careful leaving because people leave disposable grills everywhere.

Join the party in the parking lot; in Milwaukee, a ballgame is an all-day celebration.

Need more American Family Field tips? Check out this guide to Brewers game parking, some tips for newbies, and this complete list of Brewers game shuttles! And many more Brewers game tips here

Planning a trip to Milwaukee? Save a bunch of money on hotels, flights and rental cars…book your trip with my friends at Hotwire! (It’s still Kurt’s favorite!)

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Click here to start booking your trip to Milwaukee and American Family Field today!

(Note: this article contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, Ballpark E-Guides earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!)

 

Citizens Bank Park Parking Guide | Philadelphia Phillies

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re planning to see a Philadelphia Phillies home game, there’s actually a lot to know about how to get to Citizens Bank Park. This complete Citizens Bank Park parking guide will tell you everything you need to know, plan ahead and choose a parking spot that works best for you.

It’s a good idea to just drive and park at a Phillies game in most cases, since there’s ample parking. Public transit to the game isn’t terrible, but it’s not ideal. But don’t just choose the first available lot; I’ll help you have an easier time of it.

 

citizens bank park parking guide

Lots of Phillies parking, especially on non-game days!

You have a lot of options to choose from, so I’m breaking this down for you, including alternate routes you can use to find prime parking spots at a Phillies game.

Getting to Citizens Bank Park (+ Alternate Routes)
Official Philadelphia Phillies Parking
Satellite Phillies Parking Lots + Tailgating
Cheap Parking (With A Bit of A Walk)
Free Street Parking Spaces
The Chickie’s and Pete’s Taxi Crab
Parking For The Day in Philadelphia

Something for everyone! We’ll get started after this quick word from our sponsor:

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best route to phillies parking lots

“Found it! OK where do we park?”

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 1: Driving To Citizens Bank Park (+ Best Route)

The Citizens Bank Park parking lots are easily accessible from several exits of I-76 (aka the Schuylkill Expressway) going east-west and I-95 going north-south. From New Jersey, the ballpark is close to the Walt Whitman Bridge, which is part of I-76.

There are several interchanges to use that are marked “Stadium Complex”, so you can take the less obvious and less backed up exits before and after the marked ones (the park is visible from the elevated highways).

Traffic does get backed up, although the delays aren’t usually enough to make you miss anything if you arrive an hour before first pitch. You should check to see if there is another event going on in the sports complex, though, and arrive extra early if there is.

This is the best way to get there for me (I come from South Jersey): try using exit 348 from I-76 or exit 13-14 from I-95, onto Penrose Avenue. (This can be done going east as well.) Penrose is a good route to approach the park, since most people are coming from the roads at the frequently used exits and there’s plenty of parking from this direction. It’s easier getting out after the game for the same reason.

My only exception is when another event is going on. All of the city’s sports teams (and concerts etc.) use the South Philadelphia sports complex, so it can be a problem when more than one event is happening. Lincoln Financial Field (Eagles) and the Wells Fargo Center (Flyers/76ers) are south of the ballpark, so your best bet in this case is to approach the ballpark from Packer Avenue if you can, away from the other arenas.

I-76 traffic eastbound can be bad anytime, which you can avoid by taking I-476 south (called the “Blue Route” by locals) to I-95 north and using the I-95 exits. I-95 from the north also has its rough moments; Delaware Avenue runs parallel to it and becomes Pattison Avenue south of I-76 if you need to escape it.

If you find yourself with tickets for a Friday night game during the summer months, don’t even try to use I-76 eastbound. The traffic headed to the Jersey shore could well make you miss several innings. Try using a SEPTA Regional Rail train if you can and just make sure you can get back.

Coming from well north of the ballpark, I-295 in New Jersey is almost always better than I-95, and you can use the Walt Whitman Bridge and be right there. But as I write this, the I-295/I-76 interchange is in construction mode (as a Jersey native I can tell you it always seems that way); you might see some delays near game time especially.

 

 
Citizens bank park parking map philadelphia phillies

Am I the only one that thinks this map would be more useful before you park?

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 2: Official Philadelphia Phillies Parking

The Phillies have a helpful parking map on their Parking Information page for your viewing pleasure…but here’s a bit more to know.

Most of the lots owned by the Phillies are north of Pattison Avenue and mostly west of the ballpark along Citizens Bank Way; the preferred parking lots for season ticket holders are close to the ballpark but don’t offer any kind of easier out.

The lots for pay as you go folks are large, but there are lots south of Pattison and east of the ballpark that are actually closer. The cost of car parking is about the same in all the surrounding lots, so no need to search for deals at the last minute. You shouldn’t have a problem actually finding a spot for most games.

If you’re planning to enjoy all of the attractions in Ashburn Alley (and you should), try to get a spot near the left field entrance (Lots T, U, and V) and be early.

Tailgating is not permitted in the lots next to the ballpark; for pre-game partying you can use the lots south of Pattison Avenue. The tailgating scene is somewhat respectable as baseball tailgating goes. (Milwaukee it’s not, but it’s a good time.)

You can purchase a pre-paid parking pass on the Phillies website; but there’s a small service fee for it and most times you won’t need it. The Phillies have a useful page on their site that shows the easiest way to get to your seats; if you want to minimize your walking, you can plan ahead and use the best parking lot closest to the best gate.

The Phillies lots are also, for the most part, annoyingly last-in-first-out…if you need a quick exit consider some of the satellite lot choices below.

Free bonus tip for baseball history buffs! If you’re looking for the home plate location from Veterans Stadium (previous home of the Phillies), it’s in Lot U.

 

 
phillies tailgating eagles lincoln financial field parking lot

Nothing like being able to tailgate in the rain. Philly sports teams truly care.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 3: Satellite Parking Lots

Lincoln Financial Field (Eagles) has sizable lots that are used for Phillies games; this is the most popular tailgating spot for a couple of reasons; there are ample port-a-potties to help you reset the clock before getting in line, and there are also large solar panels covering rows of parking spots that provide cover or shade from the weather.

The closest Lincoln and Jetro Warehouse lots are right across Pattison Avenue from the ballpark and are closer than some of the Phillies lots, although they don’t offer a quicker exit. (My lot of choice is usually Lot G, on the other side of Xfinity Live! It’s not cheaper, but it’s very convenient both to the ballpark and a westward exit on Pattison.)

If you are tailgating, it’s advised not to park your car in a dark remote corner because (I kid you not, someone online said this) someone may urinate on it.

The Xfinity Live! complex west of the Linc lot offers valet parking for about the same price as other parking; there’s no tailgating obviously but you can use a credit or debit card here if you’ve forgotten to bring cash. You’d probably want to tip the guy, so that’s an extra couple of bucks. This is very convenient to the ballpark, and good if you want to hang out here for the party afterward, but Xfinity Live! ain’t cheap. Bring your gold card.

Across the street from the FDR Club on Pattison Avenue (west of the NRG train station) is the NovaCare complex. Just west of the complex is a large parking lot with plenty of space for fans. It isn’t any cheaper and it’s a 20-minute walk, but this is a very easy and quick in and out.

Leaving this lot, make a right away from the ballpark instead of toward it onto Pattison, drive a few blocks and then turn left or right onto Penrose Avenue, which can get you to both I-95 and I-76 respectively. You’ll sail out of there in a hurry, and the walk helps you burn off your Federal Donuts.

The Live! Casino just north of the ballpark replaced a fairly unpopular Holiday Inn; unfortunately that also removed a favorite parking location of mine. They do offer free (or reimbursed) Phillies game day parking for Live! Rewards® members, but that probably costs more than it’s worth. Otherwise parking here is more expensive than Phillies lots; it’s a convenient location but you can do better for the price.

As I said earlier, Lincoln Financial Field’s lots are the best of the tailgating spots. East of Lincoln Financial is the Jetro warehouse (Lot M), which is also a popular tailgate destination. Jetro doesn’t offer the “car ports” that the Linc lot does though, and it isn’t any cheaper except from a good distance away, so if tailgating is your thing and you’re early, try the Linc lot first.

 

 
citizens bank park best tailgating parking spots

They don’t remove the bicycle racks until you promise you won’t tailgate.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 4: Cheaper (But Farther) Phillies Parking

The Phillies and the sports complex offer ample enough parking that there aren’t a lot of options farther away, but there are a few decent options to save a few bucks.

There is a church on 10th Avenue (Stella Maris Catholic Convent) north of the ballpark with parking that is cheaper than the Phillies lots, and it’s an easier out if you know where you’re going. Not too long of a walk and a nice view coming towards the ballpark. Incidentally, this spot is a short walk from Oregon Steaks if you’re interested in a classic Philly cheesesteak, but it’s in the opposite direction from the ballpark. Plenty of walking with that, but it burns off the calories.

The lots south of Lincoln Financial Field (as in the football stadium itself) aren’t any cheaper and are a long walk, but there is a lot behind the Jetro building that offers a lower rate. This one is a hike and dark at night games, however, and they claim to prohibit tailgating (although I saw some going on).

Similarly, east of the ballpark on Pattison you can find a lot or two that charges a few bucks less; it’s definitely a longer walk from here and some of them are gravel, but if you don’t mind this it’s also an easier out eastward after the game (partly because it’s cleared out by the time you get there).

 

 
free street parking at phillies games

Note the presence of a car owned by the Phillies…that’s a clue!

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 5: Free Street Parking For Phillies Games

My favorite spot for free street parking at Phillies games is on the western side of 7th Street north of Packer Avenue. I say this because I saw cars parked there and employees of the team coming from that direction, and they usually know how to park for free. I’ve done this without a problem, but you need to be early, and again it’s a walk.

Parking on South Lawrence Street in front of Samuels & Son for free was once common, but of late people have been getting ticketed for this. If you aren’t comfortable on South Lawrence, you can maybe try 3rd Street one block east, or some of the streets north and west of the ballpark, like Bigler Street (I believe the only time you can’t park on Bigler is when the street cleaners are out).

I’ve also seen people park on Hartranft Street west of the ballpark, which is almost as close as an official lot. I can’t speak to whether anyone’s ever been ticketed or towed, but they didn’t seem worried.

The Marconi Plaza park on the corner of Bigler and Broad has some angled parking spaces that I believe are free (I’ve never tried it). This is a good hike to the ballpark, but it’s not far from Chickie’s and Pete’s and their Taxi Crab shuttle (more on that in a minute). South of the plaza on Carlisle Street there is one hour parking on the east side until 6:00 PM, presumably after that you can park there and use the Taxi Crab.

There used to be free parking at the nearby FDR Park and Golf Club on Pattison west of the ballpark, but no longer. The Park charges a flat rate that applies all day on game day unless you’re a member of the club. I’ve read news stories of people being ticketed parking there for games.

All street parking is at your own risk of course; the Philly parking authority to my understanding isn’t very lenient whether there’s a clear sign on the street or not. The only spot I’m confident using is 7th Street.

 

 
chickie's and pete's taxi crab philadelphia phillies games

Someone at Chickie’s and Pete’s realized that “cab” is very close to “crab”. And that, my friends, is genius.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 6: Chickie’s and Pete’s Taxi Crab – Phillies Shuttle

If you want a meal and/or less expensive brew near Citizens Bank Park, the Taxi Crab from Chickie’s and Pete’s offers the best of both worlds.

At Chickie’s and Pete’s on Packer Avenue, you can order their famous crab fries and a beer to go with it, cheaper than in the ballpark and in a climate-controlled eatery. And they’ll give you a ride to the game in the colorful Taxi Crab, a free shuttle (tip the driver a couple bucks) with a cool paint job.

The shuttle is free but unfortunately you have to pay to park at Chickie’s and Pete’s. It costs a bit less than parking at the ballpark though, and your car is valet parked. And you can enjoy a meal at a popular local institution. It’s especially great for visitors who want that Philly experience.

FYI, Chickie’s and Pete’s has a stand in the ballpark for their famous crab fries, but the crab fries are much more expensive at the game (they even charge extra for the necessary cheese sauce). Instead, park at the restaurant itself, order crab fries to go, and get a ride to Citizens Bank Park’s front door.

Besides the iconic fries, Chickie’s and Pete’s has good grub at fairly reasonable prices. You won’t save too much money eating here over eating at the game, but there’s a decent selection of food and a long list of quality beers. It’s a big place, so you can probably land a seat.

So there are several benefits to the Taxi Crab: cheaper crab fries, less post-game traffic hassles, and a less expensive place for a drink before or after the game. It’s a great deal if you’re including a meal or a couple of drinks with your baseball.

 

 
citizens bank park downtown parking septa phillies

Once you get out to where all those tall buildings are, you’re not gonna want to walk it.

Citizens Bank Park Parking, Part 7: Pre-Paid Parking in Center City Philadelphia

As I’ve said, you can buy pre-paid parking on the Phillies’ website, but you also have the option of parking in Center City (downtown for you non-Philadelphians) and using the SEPTA Broad Street Line to the ballpark. The Sports Express train is worth the extra effort if you can get on that one, trust me.

Some people do this move, but I only recommend this option if you’re making a day of it in Philly and including some sightseeing with your baseball (like the actual Liberty Bell); if you’re staying in a hotel downtown you’ll probably have a parking spot anyway, but if not, this is a viable option.

But if it does sound like a plan to book a space in the city and use the subway, definitely book it beforehand with my friends at SpotHero. They offer tons of great selections and you can choose the best deals near the train and favorite local attractions (if you’re a foodie who’s never been to Philly, definitely make the Reading Terminal Market one of your stops).

 

citizens bank park parking guide exit

And thank you for that useful parking map!

So to sum up all of this, the parking at Citizens Bank Park is ample and nearly always sufficient; you shouldn’t even need to buy in advance in most cases. The best strategy is to choose your spot beforehand, and plan your route accordingly, based on whether you want to save money, have a short walk, tailgate, eat beforehand or all of these things.

 

Need More Phillies Game Tips at Citizens Bank Park?

I’ve got plenty of other advice for your next Phillies game at Citizens Bank Park, including what to choose from the amazing food selection, how to land a great seat at a Phillies game, and much more…or you can simply read my complete guide to the Phillies’ ballpark here.

Thanks for reading, and please support our great sponsors!

Planning a trip to Philadelphia? Save a bunch of money on hotels, flights and rental cars…book your trip with my friends at Hotwire! (It’s still Kurt’s favorite!)

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Click here to start booking your trip to Philadelphia and Citizens Bank Park today!

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Fenway Park Parking Guide – Best Boston Red Sox Parking

Posted by Kurt Smith

Even though I’m known for recommending that you take the T to Fenway, I’m still here to help if you want to drive and park. This Fenway Park parking guide will help you find an affordable spot, get to the ballpark easily and spare yourself a lot of headaches. You should definitely know what you’re doing, so read this carefully and commit it to memory.

And if you’re one of those folks that loves to beat the man and find free street parking at Fenway Park, this will help you with that too.

(Taking a trip to see the Red Sox? Check out my complete Fenway Park guide here!)

Here’s the breakdown of what you should know:

Driving to Fenway Park
Pre-Paid Red Sox Parking
Parking Close to Fenway
Cheaper Parking at Fenway
Free Street Parking
A Few More Fenway Park Parking Tips

 

fenway park parking guide

You can do better than this. Stick with me.

But first, an extremely valuable and applicable bit of advice from our sponsor:
 

Never Drive To Fenway Park Without A Plan…

Book Your Parking Spot NOW With My Friends at SpotHero!

 
driving to Fenway park

Wally sez: “Where the H do you park around here?”

Fenway Park Parking, Part 1: Driving to Fenway Park

The closest interstate to Fenway is I-90 (Massachusetts Turnpike) running east-west north of the park; I-93 runs north-south east of the park.

The Red Sox provide directions on their website, with warnings that not only does traffic back up an hour before game time, it tends to back up at Brookline Avenue, Beacon Street and Commonwealth Avenue, Storrow Drive, and at Kenmore Square where Fenway is located. All these points are north and west.

Be sure to understand the distinction between road signs that say “Fenway Park”, as opposed to “Fenway”—the latter will take you to the actual Fenway neighborhood rather than the ballpark in Kenmore Square.

 

red sox game storrow drive

“Luke, no! It’s a trap!!”

Since all of the Red Sox directions to Fenway involve Storrow Drive, try to find a way to avoid it. You can take the Prudential exit off of the Pike, use Huntington Avenue west and turn right on Massachusetts Avenue. From there a left will bring you into Kenmore Square. Or you can just use the easy-exit Prudential Center or 100 Clarendon lots.

The hard part, actually, is after the game. Leaving the ballpark, streets that you used to get in will change direction, and if you park close to Kenmore Square you will have to contend with thousands of pedestrians. This is another reason I suggest parking further away, and if you don’t want to do the walk, read on.

 

 
fenway park parking prepaid

You want to avoid this.

Fenway Park Parking, Part 2: Pre-Paid Red Sox Parking – Yes, Do This!!

There is a fair amount of parking in the area of Fenway Park, but you might not want to pay over $50 for something that isn’t as close or isn’t as easy to get out of as you might like.

Even if you don’t care how much you pay to park…an attitude local lot owners count on, believe me…I strongly recommend that you reserve a spot beforehand. It’s difficult enough trying to find an affordable lot; doing so in Kenmore Square traffic on game day will drive you insane.

With a prepaid app like SpotHero, people can reserve spots ahead of time for a Red Sox game. Anything from large outfits like Pilgrim to people’s driveways can be included.

 

car wash red sox

I don’t know if they park your car in the middle of the car wash, but it doesn’t hurt to check.

You simply enter the date of the game, select from available spots, and your prepaid app will send you a printable reservation or a bar code on your phone for a guaranteed spot. Easy peezy. There are recommendations from people on different spots and they’ll even let you know if you can tailgate (which isn’t very common in Boston, but just saying).

Even if you are okay paying more for a closer spot, with pre-paid parking you can get something close to the highway, choose something that isn’t too exorbitant, read about who double parks or stacks cars, and choose a lot that works best for you. Plug the address into your GPS, and your day at Fenway just got a million times easier.

But definitely Book. Your. Parking. Beforehand.

 

 
red sox game parking

“Yeah, that’s mine in the back there. I’ll wait.”

Fenway Park Parking, Part 3: Parking Near The Ballpark

There are about 6,000 parking spaces within a 15-minute walk from Fenway Park. Parking is so rough at Fenway that some lots advertise “no blocking”. For a weekday game, with the area full of commuters, your chances of finding a spot decrease even more dramatically (and even the Red Sox are more emphatic that you should use the T on weekdays).

If you want to be close and don’t care about the traffic leaving, you can reserve spots in the lots on Lansdowne or Ipswich Street or Brookline Avenue for a highway robbery price.

If you’ve found someone crazy enough to drive a busload of friends to the game, bus parking is available in Lot B, near PlantPub (where Boston Beer Works used to be). For handicapped parking, the Sox list Jersey Street between Van Ness Street and Boylston Street, Ipswich Street near Gate B, and Overland Street next to Brookline Avenue. Convenient, but you will be waiting a long time to leave.

The Red Sox do a nice thing by providing a list of lots and garages on their website with prices, availability and addresses of nearby lots, but most of them don’t offer parking for under $40 on game days, even in lots that are a fair distance from the ballpark.

 

fenway park parking shell station

People will pay more for something close to the Red Sox font.

Distance from the ballpark does not always equal lower prices, by the way; in my visits I’ve seen the Shell station on Boylston charge almost twice as much as a Sunoco across the street, and I’ve also seen lots almost a half mile away from the ballpark charging $60. Don’t be intimidated if you see a high-priced lot further away.

Again, I can’t stress this enough. Book your parking in advance.

In many of the small lots (think 60 spaces or less), you could be double and triple parked, which can add to the headache of leaving after the game. Grab a bite nearby…there are plenty of spots in Fenwayville…and wait for the crowd to thin out. Or you can park at the Symphony garage on Westland Avenue to avoid this…it’s more expensive, but they valet park your car for you.

 

 
cheap fenway park parking

Hopefully this lot isn’t an hour walk away. (I’m joking, it’s not.)

Fenway Park Parking, Part 4: Cheaper Parking for Fenway Park

Here are some of the less expensive parking options for parking at Fenway and why I recommend them. They are a bit farther away, but several are close to T stations.

 

baseball parking 100 clarendon street

So secret is this spot, I’m giving you the address!

100 Clarendon Street. This one is my favorite; I’ve used this garage a few times and have always been very happy with it. The Sox’s official lot is right off of I-90 on Clarendon Street and has 2,000 spaces; it’s close to the interstate but it’s a good hike from the park, over a mile.

So long as you have your ticket stub, the lot will only charge you a third of the going rate. You can book ahead on your favorite app for a very low price by Fenway Park parking standards, and have plenty left over for an extra Fenway Frank.

If you don’t mind the walk (and I never do, it’s actually a nice walk through town), this is your affordable option with a very easy out onto I-90.

 

back bay t station

This sign is visible from the 100 Clarendon lot entrance.

If you want to avoid the walk, it’s near the Back Bay T Station, and you can use Commuter Rail to get to Lansdowne Station just steps from the ballpark IF you time your arrival right. (This might be tougher on weekends with less frequent service.)

If it’s too long a wait, it’s also not far from Copley Station, for an easy if crowded Green Line train ride to Kenmore.

Even with the train ride cost for 2-3 people, you’re still way ahead

 

parking at fenway park prudential center

It might be a buck or two more when you read this…and it’s actually probably the third best deal in town.

Prudential Center. The shops at the Pru Center have a lot that charges a bit more than Pilgrim (it’s $20 as I write this) but still much less than lots closer to Fenway; you do have to have a ticket stub. They claim to be Boston’s largest parking garage, so spot availability should be less of a problem here (and your car won’t be stacked on top of another one). Plenty of good pregame eats much cheaper than ballpark prices in the food court and in the area.

The Pru Center is also a bit of a hike (it’s in the path of the walk from 100 Clarendon but not much closer), about a mile away, but it’s very convenient to I-90 after the game. If you are too tired to do it coming back, you can take a Green Line train to Copley and transfer to an E train back to Prudential (or just walk it, it’s short), or use the Commuter Rail from Lansdowne to Back Bay.

 

red sox parking prudential center

Your easy landmark after the game.

You can see the Pru Center building inside the ballpark, beyond the right field scoreboard, so you know exactly which direction to walk in when the game’s over.

Hynes Auditorium Garage. Pilgrim Parking (50 Dalton Street) across from the Prudential Center charges a third of what most lots charge on weekends (it’s available on weekends only). This along with the Pru Center is a good spot to find Boston Pedicabs…you can read about them here.

This is a great choice for an even shorter walk; Google Maps calls it at just 13 minutes.

Symphony Garage (41 Westland Avenue). The Symphony Garage at the corner of Westland and Massachusetts Avenue is about a 15-minute walk, but it’s a bit cheaper, an easier out, and they’ll valet park your car for you so you’re not stacked behind or under other cars.

 

fenway park parking deaconness garage

Is a Deaconess a female Deacon?

Beth Israel Deaconess (330 Brookline Avenue). This lot charges about half of what most lots closer to Fenway cost, and it’s an easy straight walk up Brookline Avenue.

Longwood Medical Center (375 Longwood Avenue). The garage for the local hospital is about a quarter mile away, and is one of the cheapest lots around if you don’t mind the walk, which is about as far as the Pru Center. You can take a Green Line D to or from Longwood station to skip the walk.

Boston University (766 Commonwealth Avenue). This lot is about half the price of most Fenway lots; it’s about a 20-minute walk, but it’s also close to the BU East T station on the Green Line if you’re not quite up to the hike after the game.

Museum of Fine Arts (465 Huntington Avenue). The Museum of Fine Arts is about a ten-minute walk from the ballpark, and they offer a nice deal on weekdays…$17 as of this writing if you arrive after 5:30 PM. I have read that this isn’t in the best part of Boston, however.

 

pilgrim parking fenway park

I finally found a place to P at Fenway!

As far as parking meters, the local government has passed ordinances limiting the amount of street parking that can be had for Sox games, or at least charging a lot more for it. The new meter prices on Beacon Street, for example, aren’t quite what lots charge, but they’re no longer a steal or even worth the effort.

So that should be enough to help you find a deal and a short walk to Fenway Park. When we come back, I’ll name some spots where people have found free street parking at Fenway Park.

But first, this quick word from our sponsor:

My friends at TickPick have Red Sox tickets…they offer a best price guarantee, a buyer’s trust guarantee, and NO service fees. Sounds like a no-brainer to me!

red sox tickets tickpick

Click here to order your Red Sox tickets on TickPick!

 

 
fenway park parking getting towed

Just so you know, Lansdowne Street next to Fenway isn’t a free spot. Not even if you have a fancy car and think you’re important.

Fenway Park Parking, Part 5: Free Street Parking at Fenway Park

Yes, you can park for free at Fenway Park; there are even some spaces that aren’t much further away than lots that go for $50. But be aware of certain things…street parking is at your own risk. If you get a ticket, the city will ensure that you wish you paid for parking elsewhere. I am not guaranteeing any of these spots; they are places I’ve found in my forum searches and visits to the ballpark.

There are still some side streets that are a bargain or even free. One more disclaimer: I wrote this in 2018, and as you can imagine this stuff changes, but hopefully I’m giving you enough to have alternatives if your wallet is light.

 

red sox parking ipswich street

Is this where I can find Ipswich clams?

Ipswich Street. Near Lansdowne Street there is a back street portion of Ipswich that is a residents-only spot, but the resident parking is enforced from 6:00 PM on, so this should be a free spot for day games. I saw several cars without permits parked there for a game. This is practically right around the corner from the ballpark, and just steps away from a lot that is $50 as I write this.

Gardner Museum. About six blocks south of the park, the Isabella Gardner Museum sits across from Simmons College. Supposedly there is some Sunday street parking on Evans Way and Avenue Louis Pasteur here. This isn’t one of the better parts of Boston though, so this might be a day game choice.

 

fenway park street parking brookline avenue

A straight walk to the ballpark!

Brookline Avenue/Chapel Street. West and south of Fenway Park there are metered spots along Brookline Avenue that become free after 6:00 PM, and a bit west is Chapel Street and the metered Longwood T lot. These are a steal if you land one, costing you only about $3-4 to feed the meter until 6:00 PM or for free on Sundays and holidays. For your efforts there are lots of eateries on Brookline to grab some takeout to bring in.

Burlington Avenue. Burlington is a side street from Brookline Avenue; there is reportedly free street parking here but you’ve got to be early. It’s a great spot if you land one though, and just a 5-minute walk.

Lansdowne MBTA Station. Just in front of the Commuter Rail station at Fenway I’ve read there is space for about a dozen cars, and there’s no parking restriction…for the moment. Just don’t block the European Car Doctors garage entrance.

Boston University/Bay State Road. There are some metered spots on Bay State Road on the Storrow Drive side near the Boston U. dorms, and on Commonwealth Avenue south of it. From Bay State it’s about a quarter mile walk. BU is buying up locations with spots, so this should be a last resort.

 

red sox parking back bay

Well, I’m kind of a resident for today…

Back Bay Side Streets. On Sundays meters are inactive on the side streets of Commonwealth Avenue, east of the ballpark in the Back Bay area. Hereford and Gloucester Streets aren’t terribly far from Fenway.

There you go…some options for beating the man and parking for free at Fenway Park. Good luck and be careful.

 

 
boston pedicab fenway park

These guys are useful…tip them well!

Fenway Park Parking, Part 6: A Few More Parking Tips

There are a lot of good reasons not to park too close to the ballpark; insane parking prices, long waits to get in and out, and Kenmore Square traffic on game day. Keep in mind that with many of the lots I’ve suggested, you can use a subway or commuter rail train to get to the ballpark and still come out ahead.

Boston Pedicabs is another viable and fun option from many spots including the Pru Center area; you get a nice ride on a rickshaw through the city and an easy exit once you do get to the car. You won’t necessarily save money, but it’s still easier on the psyche.

Meters on Jersey Street become priority spaces on game nights, so you won’t save any money there.

Ultimately, it’s usually just easier to use an MBTA subway or commuter rail train to get to a Red Sox game. But if you plan ahead, driving and parking doesn’t have to be so bad. You can save a lot of money and aggravation if you’re willing to walk just a little bit. Again, reserve a spot before the game, and get there as early as you can.

 

fenway park guide parking

Lots more where this came from!

Want to know more about the famous ballpark in Boston? Check out my complete Fenway Park guide…with everything you need to know for your next Red Sox game, including getting tickets, choosing a seat, and what to eat. Fenway Park isn’t for amateurs…be prepared!

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chicago hotwire

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Ultimate Yankee Stadium Parking Guide: Cheap, Pre-Paid + Free Parking.

Posted by Kurt Smith

Driving and parking at Yankee Stadium isn’t usually the best option (read my much more detailed post about that here, or my basic Stadium tips here), but I understand why you might not prefer to ride on a crowded train. So just for you, I have put together this extensive guide to Yankee Stadium parking.

 

macombs dam bridge

Don’t get to this point without having read this post.

I’ve included alternate driving routes, easy outs toward your destination, and advantages and disadvantages of each spot, including proximity to bring your own sandwich shops!

Whether you’re a first time visitor or a regular, there’s valuable information here for you to help you save money and make your life easier. Here’s a table of contents for you so you can skip anything that doesn’t apply:

Alternate Driving Routes to Yankee Stadium
Official Yankees Game Parking, You Know, From The Yankees
Yankee Stadium Satellite Parking Lots (Including Cheaper Ones)
Prepaid Yankee Stadium Parking!
Free Street Parking at Yankee Stadium
Yankee Stadium Tailgating
Handicapped Parking at Yankee Stadium

(If you need more Yankee Stadium help, I’ve got the info on how to choose a great seat, the extensive Stadium food menu, and how to save money on Yankees tickets!)

My friends at TickPick have Yankees tickets…they offer a best price guarantee, a buyer’s trust guarantee, and NO service fees. Sounds like a no-brainer to me!

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alternate route yankee stadium

Yes, Geo is short for George. In fact that was his little known nickname.

Alternate Driving Routes to Yankee Stadium

Most routes to Yankee Stadium use I-87, also called the Major Deegan Expressway. Needless to say, traffic gets heavy on game days. You can also approach the Stadium from I-95, aka the Cross Bronx Expressway. The Yankees have gotten lazy with directions and now they just send you to Google Maps to figure it out.

If you arrive early enough (as in at least two hours early) traffic and parking isn’t bad at all, but after the game it can be rough exiting if you don’t pick the ideal spot.

If you don’t have Google Maps handy for any reason, here’s some alternate routes:

 

macombs-dam-bridge

Note the absence of heavy ballgame traffic!

Alternate Route #1: If you’re coming via the George Washington Bridge (from NJ) and want to avoid the Deegan traffic, try using the Jerome Avenue exit from I-95, or taking the Harlem River Drive south in Manhattan and using the Macombs Dam Bridge.

Alternate Route #2: You can also try using a different entrance into Manhattan from NJ (like the Lincoln or Holland Tunnels) and using the Henry Hudson Parkway on the West Side.

Similarly, coming back you can use the Macombs Dam Bridge back into Manhattan. This route avoids much of I-87 and its congestion.

 

deegan expressway yankee stadium

Yes, it’s actually spelled “Triborough”. Do you know how much funding it takes to add “ugh” on a road sign?

Alternate Route #3: After the game, if you’re heading south on I-87, try using the Grand Concourse south and meeting up with I-87 near the Triborough Bridge. Good for getting to Queens or Brooklyn. Parking a few blocks south makes exiting very easy if you drive south away from the ballpark.

Alternate Route #4: If you’re heading north after the game, you can use the Grand Concourse rather than the Deegan to get to I-95, or use it to the Moshulu Parkway to get to I-87 north. Might be a little easier with post-game traffic.

 

 
yankee stadium parking map

Well this is really helpful AFTER you’ve parked…

Official Yankees Game Parking, You Know, From The Yankees

The Yankees do have a fairly helpful parking map, check out a bigger version here.

Most parking lots near the Stadium charge a stiff fee for parking during the regular season and even more for playoffs–and not even New Yorkers pay it, so there’s usually spaces available.

That said, you can (and should) book Yankees’ lots beforehand on the Quik Park Garages website, especially since some lots don’t accept cash, but it isn’t any cheaper that way. Even official Yankees lots can be a bit of a hike, so look at the map and choose one ahead of time.

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yankee stadium parking river avenue garage

Hmmm, tough call, but I think I’ll exit to Yankee Stadium.

If you’re using a Yankees lot, the River Avenue garage is the most expensive but also the most convenient; it’s right across the street and very close to cool souvenir shops and some eateries. It’s a couple bucks extra, but it’s worth it for the convenience especially for families.

The Gerard Avenue Lot is also nearby and may cost a tad less, but it’s not as close to the bring your own eateries on 161st.

The 164th Street Garage is also right there on the north side of the Stadium, and it’s closer to less congested gates like Gate 2 where you can get into the Stadium away from the B-D-4 crowd.

 

Ruppert Garage Yankee Stadium

Thanks for the advice about parking my own car, but I wasn’t planning on parking someone else’s anyway.

The East 161st Street Garage and Ruppert Plaza Garages are nice and convenient; they’re close to the Stadium, somewhat separated from the hustle and bustle at the train station, and allow for a quick and easy exit over the Macombs Dam Bridge or onto the Major Deegan.

The Harlem River area lots are a few bucks cheaper and an easier out onto the Deegan, and there should be plenty of people heading towards the Metro-North station nearby so you’ll feel safe. It’s a few extra minutes’ walk, but that helps traffic clear out.

 

yankee stadium parking metro north station

Yes, Babe Ruth played on that field. The lighting wasn’t as good then.

The 153rd Street Garage and Lot are both across Heritage Park field, close to the Metro-North station, so it’s an easy and safe walk (past lots of scalpers, incidentally). Once you’re this far away, though, you can probably book a cheaper garage …stay tuned.

If the 151st Street North and 151st Street South lots are all that’s available from the Yankees, look for something better. Remember Yankee Stadium is on 161st…so these lots are ten blocks away, further than you’ll likely want to walk, at least for the price.

One thing to remember though…AAA will provide free roadside service if you’re broke down in one of the Yankees’ lots. Should you have such trouble, head to Gate 6 or Gate 2 and find a Guest Services Booth.

Now, onto parking lots not operated by the Yankees…but first, a valuable and applicable bit of advice from our sponsor, SpotHero!

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Yankees parking spothero

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yankee stadium parking lots

A makeshift sign on a vine-covered fence? What’s not to trust?

Yankee Stadium Satellite Parking Lots

There are ample and somewhat cheaper satellite parking lots at Yankee Stadium. Most satellite lots are safe and can be half the price of closer Yankees lots, but it is still the Bronx, and you may be a little uneasy walking too far at night. You can book most of these ahead of time with SpotHero (and I highly recommend doing so).

Here are a couple of my favorites…

 

yankee stadium parking bronx terminal market

A Yankees game with a day at Chuck E. Cheese just might make my life complete.

The Bronx Terminal garage is about a half mile south and about half the cost of Yankees lots; for day games you probably won’t mind the walk. Again, it could make you wary at night, but there should be plenty of people heading towards nearby lots. The Bronx Terminal Market has some cool eateries and shops, but it can be a slow exit if the market is still open.

MPG Parking operates several Yankee Stadium parking garages…there’s one at 810 River Avenue, which is nice and convenient, just a block or so away, and last I checked you could book this on a parking app for cheaper than some further official Yankees lots.

There is a lot as 86 East 158th garage next door, about which I’ve read this: “Drivers like this being one of the closest available lots but also note the inevitable congestion before and after the game.” Probably true for 810 River Avenue as well. BUT! These two garages are right there at Stan’s Sports Bar, a favorite of Yankees fans. Please don’t drink and drive, at least not in that order.

 

river avenue parking yankee stadium

They could charge more for parking if they moved the trash bags and let people drive in.

North of the Stadium a few blocks on River Avenue, parking gets cheaper, and since it’s under the 4 train tracks it’s easy to find your way to the Stadium and back.

If you’re uncomfortable walking it at night, you can choose an inexpensive spot near the 167th Street Station and take a train (B, D, and 4 all work) one stop back. The 1185 River Avenue Garage from Park Right is a good spot for this, and it’s an easy exit onto I-95 (aka the Cross Bronx Expressway, for you city slickers).

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Concourse Village Parking

You could take advantage of the half hour special, if you just took some pictures of the Stadium and left. (Photo courtesy of ParkWhiz.)

East of the ballpark past the Grand Concourse are also some cheaper lots, but I wouldn’t use these unless you’re familiar with the area and it’s an easier out for you. It’s much easier to get lost there both on foot and driving, and it’s a further walk than you would think. But if you think you can handle it, try 771 Concourse Village West…it’s cheap and not terribly far.

You could drive into Manhattan and find a cheaper place to park and get on the 4 train, which might be advantageous depending on your starting point. It will probably be cheaper and not far from a train that can get you there.

 

 
Yankees parking

Pro tip! Tell them you’re here for a “general event”!

Prepaid Yankee Stadium Parking!

If you’re driving to Yankee Stadium, your life will be a lot (pun intended) easier if you book your spot ahead of time.

In case I haven’t made it clear yet in this post, Yankee Stadium parking is best planned ahead. You definitely do not want to just grab the first spot you find, and possibly pay more for something that isn’t as close or isn’t as easy to get out of as you might like.

With a pre-paid app like SpotHero (my favorite for their selection and helpful information), you can enter the date of the game, select from plenty of available spots, and the app will send you a printable reservation for a guaranteed spot…or a bar code you can put on your phone using their excellent app. Many of the garages are covered, attended and have valet service, and they’ll even let you know if you can tailgate. (Assume probably not though.)

 

 
free parking yankee stadium

If you’re looking for free double parking at Yankee Stadium, you’re really pushing it.

Free Street Parking at Yankee Stadium

So you want to park for free on the street at Yankee Stadium? I love the way you think my friend.

The area around Yankee Stadium is residential, and there are cars parked along nearby streets in nearly every direction, so if you’re able to get there very early, (and if you’re a parallel parking machine like me), you might be able to find something, especially in more residential areas east of the ballpark.

You will see cars parked on Jerome Avenue, Gerard Avenue and Walton Avenue, and the side streets off of 161st Street and the Grand Concourse. I actually saw several spaces on the Grand Concourse and didn’t see any restrictions there, and that allows for filling up your goody bag on 161st too.

I’ve also read that east of the Major Deegan Expressway, there are free street spots near the police precinct (which would probably be as safe as any spot).

 

grand concourse bronx street parking

I found a spot for you, grab it now though.

I don’t know if anyone’s been ticketed for this (one gentleman parking on Jerome Avenue told me he does it all the time), but as always, street parking is at your own risk. Sunday would be the best day to try it…there doesn’t seem to be any restrictions according to the signs, but you’d need to get there early to snag one. They fill up fast.

 
gerard avenue lot

Wouldn’t it be easier to list what you CAN do in this lot?

Yankee Stadium Tailgating

I’ve seen tailgating in a lot northeast of the Stadium, but not anywhere else. Honestly, while some people partake, there isn’t much of a tailgating scene. Miller Park, or even Citi Field, it’s not.

The Quik Park people say tailgating is allowed, but with no alcohol or open flames, which is kind of counterintuitive. Nor are you allowed to save spots…this is NYC and parking is always at a premium.

Your best deal is to park in a lot or garage near the train station, grab a sandwich and drinks at one of the delis on 161st, and grub tough on that.

I’ve also read in some forums that the NYPD is generally lenient on drinking in plastic cups at most lots, so long as you don’t cause any trouble. But basically it’s just not a tailgating kind of place. Most people do their pre-game partying at Stan’s, The Yankee Tavern, Billy’s Sports Bar, or one of the other nearby taverns here.

 

 
Yankee Stadium Handicapped parking

Gate 8 makes an excellent dropoff point, offering a full 35 seconds before you get towed.

Handicapped Parking at Yankee Stadium

The Yankees don’t say much about handicapped parking on their website, even in their Guests with Disabilities Guide. But they do have handicapped spaces in their garages, and I would highly recommend using the River Avenue Garage for the shortest trek to the Stadium, especially with the crowds that come out of the place.

Here’s another thing you should probably know…handicapped tags from other states aren’t valid in New York City, so if you’re outside of NY, try getting in touch with the Yankees Disabled Services at (718) 579-4510 and ask what they can do for you.

The Yankees also suggest dropping off guests with disabilities, so ask them about that too. It could save you a few bucks on parking.

There you are my friends…you should never have a problem finding your ideal Yankee Stadium parking spot again.

I’m here to help…so if you need more great and money-saving Yankee Stadium tips, be sure to check out this complete guide to Yankee Stadium! (And thanks for supporting my sponsors and this website!)

Note: this post contains affiliate links. If you use an affiliate link to make a purchase, the website owner earns a commission, at no extra cost to you. Thanks for your support!

 

Best Way To Get To Great American Ball Park For Reds Games

Posted by Kurt Smith

More than likely, you’re going to get to Great American Ball Park by car, since public transit isn’t as prevalent in Cincinnati as it is in, say, Chicago.

This is fine, though, since there are ample parking options. And as ballparks go, it is relatively easy to get to Great American, with several interstates on either side of downtown. You have inexpensive and expensive choices, and you have places to park where you can get in easily and places where you can get out easily.

There are also lots of places to leave your car in the neighboring towns of Newport and Covington, across the Ohio River in Kentucky. They aren’t the closest or the easiest places to walk (there are closer cheap spots), but you do have the option of the Southbank Shuttle.

My friends at TickPick have cheap Reds tickets…they offer a best price guarantee, a buyer’s trust guarantee, and NO service fees. Sounds like a no-brainer to me!

Reds tickets tickpick

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get to great american southbank shuttle

Does everything in baseball have to be named for a bank?

The Southbank Shuttle is a trolley service operated by the fine people at the Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky (TANK). The trolley service runs from either Newport or Covington, and in most cases it passes through Cincinnati and has several stops near the ballpark. It runs frequently enough that you shouldn’t have to wait long, they offer extra service for Reds games, and as of this writing it’s just a buck-fifty per ride.

You can usually find cheap or even free parking in both towns, and the nice thing is that if you plan to take in some pre- or post-game food or entertainment, you have lots of dining options and fun things to do, especially at the Newport-On-The-Levee entertainment center.

 

get to great american southbank shuttle sign

Now, if it were every 20 minutes, I wouldn’t be recommending it.

You might have reasons to park downtown for a game, and there are some good reasons to do so in certain cases. But if you’re looking for inexpensive parking with minimal walking and less traffic after the game, you could do worse than parking in Kentucky and hopping on a trolley.

My only complaint is it’s a bit of a rickety ride. I wouldn’t recommend it for pregnant women. Then again, if your companion is carrying your offspring, you should be dropping her off at the door anyway.

That’s just one way to get to Great American; there’s also the street parking near the ballpark, the new Cincinnati streetcar, even the river shuttles. Click here to read some cool parking options.

TANK website: http://www.tankbus.org

Never drive to a Reds game without a plan…

Book your parking spot now with my friends at SpotHero!

 
 
 
 
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Parking For Free At The Ballpark

Posted by vlm

Recently I interviewed Scott Chamberlain, a prominent member of Ballpark Chasers, and someone who has accomplished a pretty remarkable feat in 2016…he has paid just $2 for parking all season!

Scott graciously took the time to answer my questions and share his tips; hope you enjoy the exchange below.

 

How many games did you go to this year, and at how many ballparks?  

Up to this point, I am at 61 regular season MLB games at 8 different MLB parks and 155 sporting events on the year. I am at a slight disadvantage location-wise as I live in Indianapolis. I say slight because I have six MLB teams within a 4 1/2-hour drive of me yet none within 100 miles from my doorstep. Last season, I attended 143 MLB regular season games at all 30 MLB parks.

 

How did you find free parking? You can give me a couple of examples. Did you have a long walk in these cases, or were you going through unsavory areas of town?

I find free parking by trial and error. I have become very adept at reading street signage to be absolutely sure that a spot is free. For instance, on the south side of Chicago…there are a few blocks along 31st street that are free at all times and some that have the dreaded pay box. I’ve yet to receive a ticket as I would hate to see a “free” spot become a costly ticket.

Another good example is Wrigleyville. For day games, you can park on most streets around the stadium for free until 5pm. After that, the tow trucks are out in full force.  There are some main roads that have free parking at all times. These you have to walk 8-10 blocks but it’s a lot better than paying $15-$40 to park.

Also, I’ve found spots after doing research online or talking with fellow ballpark chasers. My favorite free spot find was given by a fellow ballpark chaser and close friend. They suggested a road southwest of Safeco Field near the port area. Sure enough, a simple six block walk to the stadium was all that was needed. And rather than fight traffic on the way out, it was strategically placed to where I could head south and onto the highway a couple interchanges down I-5 from Safeco.

Free parking is a must for me not only due to budget constraints but also ease of access. I don’t mind walking a mile or so in exchange for beating traffic around the stadium. However, safety is a concern and I will avoid unsavory areas. Miami, Boston, and Dodger Stadium are the three stadiums that I’ve had to pay for parking or use mass transit for as I haven’t found free areas yet.

 

Where did you pay $2 and why?

The $2 charge for parking kind of sticks in my craw a bit in hindsight. My drive from Indy to Cincinnati in May was longer than expected due to an accident on interstate 74. There was a bobble head that I wanted and I was worried about not getting it. I shunned one of my three “go to” free parking areas in exchange for rushing to the stadium for the giveaway. Even then, it was a metered spot that ended midway through the game so that’s where my $2 came from.

In retrospect, I wish I had parked in a usual free spot to have a perfect parking record this year.

 

You’re not cheating with this, right? No public transit or anything?

No cheating. When I did my 30 parks/143 MLB games last year, I kept a running total on every single travel expense from flights to parking to the Sunday morning hotel coffee before a game on getaway day.

What interested me about this exercise was the hidden expenses that are had. When going to Chicago for instance, I would always park at a CTA lot for five dollars and take the CTA train in. This would amount to an eleven-dollar move. Meanwhile, I was already in my car and for a few extra miles, could skip that move and park on the street.

New York and Boston are the only cities where I skip driving to games due to traffic or ease of access via mass transit. However, if you are wanting to do a NY/Philly doubleheader, street parking can be had in NY and Philly for a quick get-away.

 

What do you suggest for someone looking to park for free at the game? What are the hardest ballparks to find free parking, and which are the easiest?

If a fan is going to a game on a budget, parking fees can be a nuisance. I’d suggest arriving a couple of hours early and driving around a little to find good spots. The areas a block or two from the stadium are not necessarily convenient when you consider leaving after the game and fighting outbound traffic.

The easiest parks to find free parking are ones situated in a downtown area.  I’ve found that parking on edges of downtown areas and casinos have helped.

The hardest parks have been Boston, LA Dodgers, and Miami.

 

Do you hope to park completely for free in 2017?

I certainly hope so. I try to go to as many games as possible. It helps the budget to not have to pay to park.  Money saved here can go towards a food or drink item at the yard!