The Best Way To Get To Nationals Park From Baltimore

Washington Nationals


The Best Way To Get To Nationals Park From Baltimore

Posted by Kurt Smith

For you Birds fans or other Baltimoreans looking for the best way to get to Nationals Park from Baltimore for a game, you have a few options.

Here I’m going to share some obvious routes…with a few things you should know.

 

best way to get to nationals park from baltimore greenbelt

So…is this Greenbelt Station?

The Best Way To Get To Nationals Park From Baltimore, Route #1: Take the Green Line Metro from Greenbelt. The Metro train Green Line runs from Greenbelt station, conveniently located off of I-95/495, to the Navy Yard-Ballpark station at Nationals Park in about 40 minutes. This is probably the easiest route, but you should have a plan to get back just in case this rare but frustrating occurrence happens.

 

best way to get to nationals park from baltimore marc

You want the one on the right. Unless you’re coming home.

The Best Way To Get To Nationals Park From Baltimore, Route #2: MARC and/or AMTRAK. Amtrak runs trains from Penn Station and BWI airport in Baltimore to Union Station (Red Line) and New Carrollton Station (Orange Line), both of which are a two train ride to Nats Park. MARC runs from Camden Station to Greenbelt Station, requiring only one transfer, and the MARC train is much cheaper. Unfortunately MARC is only available during the day, so you’d need to use Amtrak (or a Metrobus, more likely, given the more frequent schedules) at least to get back after a night game.

This is a nice affordable option, especially using MARC, sparing you traffic troubles, and gas and parking money. Can be a little unwieldy though.

 

best way to get to nationals park from baltimore by car

One of these will do it.

The Best Way To Get To Nationals Park From Baltimore, Route #3: By Car. If you’re going to just drive, I highly recommend 1) booking your parking beforehand, and b) avoiding the most common highways like I-95, especially during rush hour. Try using MD295, which is truck-free, or if you’re coming from a western suburb like Ellicott City, try using the six-lane U.S. Route 29 highway to I-95/495, and then to MD 295. Route 29 is less congested than I-95 and can save you some aggravation.

Those are three of the better ways to get to Nationals Park from Baltimore, but if you’d like the full lowdown on all of your transportation options for Nationals Park, including ferries and bicycles, get wise with this handy little guide to Nationals Park.

 

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Visiting Nationals Park: Five Tips For Newbies

Posted by Kurt Smith

If you’re visiting Nationals Park in our great nation’s capital for the first time, or if you’re coming from out of town, there are definitely a few things you should know…here are five tips for a great Washington ballpark experience.

visiting nationals park tickets

Call for Walgreen’s tickets today!

Visiting Nationals Park Tip #1: Check the Nats website for deals. The Nats offer some decent deals on tickets for a team that has been contending. If you subscribe to the team newsletter, they’ll send them to you in e-mails. For low demand games especially, the team will often offer buy one get one or discounted food deals.

visiting nationals park standing room

We all need something we can lean on.

Visiting Nationals Park Tip #2) Consider standing room. I could give you some seating recommendations, but if you really want to go cheap, you can go to the Nats box office on game day and get those Grandstand seats for almost nothing. But you don’t have to sit way up there…in the upper level in the outfield are some great food items and lounge areas, and quite a few spots where you can grab a stool and sit and rest your food on a counter. If you don’t mind standing, there are rails to lean on almost everywhere else in the ballpark, just make sure your bladder is empty before you stake a good one.

visiting nationals park metro

The “alternate” entrance to the Navy Yard Station.

Visiting Nationals Park Tip #3) Take the Metro. Advice varies on the best way to get to Nats Park, but the parking situation there is among the worst in baseball. There are a limited amount of lots, and even the ones that are a mile or more away can be $20. The traffic situation for games has improved, but it’s still not much fun if you are there less than two hours before gametime. Even street parking is scarce and expensive. Just take the Metro. It isn’t perfect, but it beats the traffic and parking prices.

visiting nationals Park bens chili

Nothing like sloppy ballpark food.

Visiting Nationals Park Tip #4) Get a Ben’s Chili Half-Smoke. It’s not cheap…ballpark food never is…but save the Shake Shack and Box Frites and that Danny Meyer stuff for your next trip to Citi Field. Ben’s is a real, genuine D.C. institution, and their spicy sausages with chili and cheese are still a go-to item here. There are lots of great choices for food at Nationals Park, like the Jammin’ Island jerk chicken and the Mike Isabella sandwich stands, but try the Ben’s dog first.

visiting nationals park presidents race

They would be proud of their legacy.

Visiting Nationals Park Tip #5) Be in your seat in the middle of the fourth. One of the stories you want to share with people about your first game at Nats Park, of course, is not only who won the famous President’s Race, but also the spectacular fashion with which Teddy Roosevelt lost. And you’ll want to read about it in the excellent “Let Teddy Win” blog the next day.

Finally, if you’re a visiting team fan, expect the locals to be respectful so long as you’re not in their face. Nationals fans have had to deal with visiting Phillies and Mets fans, and they tolerate a lot. They’re nice people, but don’t push them. At least unless you plan on buying hot dogs for an entire section. (Yes, I saw a really loud and obnoxious Mets fan do that once. It’s a goofy goofy game.)

There’s a whole lot more to know about visiting Nats Park; be sure you are prepared in advance with one of these.

 

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Nationals Park Seating: Two Helpful Tips

Posted by Kurt Smith

The Nationals Park seating chart features a wide range of seating and a wide range of pricing. Here are a couple of tips…one to try and one to avoid.

nationals park seating standing room

As you can see, standing room is popular here.

Nationals Park Seating Tip #1: Use The Standing Room. Yeah, I know. You don’t want to stand for the whole game. I get that. I don’t either. But Nationals Park, in my opinion, has probably the best standing room options in baseball for several reasons.

The first is that unlike Yankee Stadium or Fenway Park, the standing room spots aren’t designated (and priced accordingly). You can pretty much choose any spot. At Nats Park, you not only have the open concourses in the lower level, but on the mezzanine in the outfield there are numerous places to sit on barstool type seating, and have a place to sit your food or beer. As far as I know, no ballpark has more places to sit and watch the game that aren’t designated paid seats than Nats Park.

The second Nationals Park Seating tip is that up on that mezzanine level in the outfield is everything you need for that social scene that the millennial baseball fans love…there’s a full bar with occasionally discounted brews, several lounge areas with misters for hot days, and as great a food selection as you’ll find, with not only the popular Shake Shack and Box Frites, but also that Jammin’ Island BBQ. If you prefer just a fun time to seeing the pitcher’s facial expression, the cheapest ticket to get into Nats Park works just fine.

nationals park seating bud brew house

I’m sure they have “RBI Nachos” or something like that.

Finally, you have access to the Budweiser Brewhouse (formerly the Red Porch) restaurant and the covered loft on the upper level. It gets packed during rain delays, but on a nice day in the later innings you may be able to snag a table or even outdoor seating with a center field view and have a decent meal with your baseball.

If you just like to have a great time at the game, you can just pick up some very cheap Nationals tickets and have several options of where to enjoy the game. And you’ll have money left over for that jerk chicken sandwich.

nationals park seating bullpen seats

Well, at least you’re in the shade.

Nationals Park Seating Tip #2: Avoid Lower Right Field Seats. There are always some seats in a ballpark that are great in pouring rain. The only problem with that is that you’re not there to watch rain.

The lower right field seats in Nationals Park are completely covered by the second deck overhang and certain sections are tucked underneath the second deck behind the bullpen. The only advantage of such seats would be being able to watch pitchers warm up, which isn’t a bad thing, but otherwise you should avoid these seats.

It’s not a big deal to miss the flight of fly balls, but in today’s ballparks especially you’ll want a view of the entire field, and obviously you’ll lose a lot of it here. On top of that, you’ll have no view whatsoever of the big scoreboard in right field…and this is a key thing here, because I couldn’t see anywhere else where you can see who’s batting or what the score is. The LED boards surrounding Nats Park show mostly ads, even during play. There are TVs in this section to keep you posted on the action, but you probably have one of those at home.

So if you have a choice, you’re better off either sitting in the upper level in the infield, or in the left field seats if you’d like to be closer to the Bud Light Loft and such. But for viewing the game these are not good seats. Unless Strasburg is pitching and you want a close-up of his warm-up tosses.

That’s just two tips for finding the best spot to stay for nine long innings at Nats Park; if you want the full lowdown on the whole ballpark, be sure to get yourself one of these.

 

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Get To Nationals Park: Avoid Ballpark Parking Fees

Posted by Kurt Smith

There are plenty of generally easy ways to get to Nationals Park; you can drive and park of course, but the traffic is rough and parking rates are Fenway-level, so here are a couple of ways to avoid both.

get to nationals park wmata

You know exactly how long you have to stand around.

Get To Nationals Park, Tip #1: Use The Metro. The D.C. Metrorail system is one of the most highly regarded in the country. The trains are clean and comfortable, service is efficient and frequent, and the system covers most anything worth reaching in D.C. proper. If you’re staying in D.C. or live there, it should not be difficult at all to get anywhere in two train rides, and transfers (most commonly at L’Enfant Plaza Station) are free.

Metrorail does something I wish more big-city transit systems would do (are you listening, SEPTA?)—they have signs at the tracks informing you how long the wait for the next train is.

Even from outside the city it’s not hard to find a park-and-ride Metro station. Nearly all of the stations close to the I-495 beltway are park-and-rides, where you can park inexpensively and for free on weekends. There are some you might want to avoid for different reasons, but the majority of them are easy in and out.

get to nationals park half street

Would be nice if you could park here.

Nationals Park is just steps away from the Navy Yard Station on the Metro’s green line. There are two entrances/exits to the station; coming from the train there are signs clearly showing the way. It’s so idiot-proof even a congressman could use it.

Upon emerging from the Navy Yard Station, Nationals Park’s impressive center field entrance is immediately in view—you can see the seats inside the open-air facility—and you pass by numerous food vendors on Half Street hawking hotdogs, water, peanuts and any other snack that you can bring into the ballpark.

As said, it isn’t terribly difficult to drive to Nationals Park, and there is a fair amount of parking. But it is still driving in the city, and not only might you get frustrated with city traffic, but you will pay a nice chunk of change to park anywhere that is less than a mile walk to the park. Coming from a park-and-ride or from another station in the city, you’re spared all of that.

And the train station platforms are pretty cool looking too.

get to nationals park ballpark bus

Tell your friends! And it’s Ladies Night!

Get To Nationals Park, Tip #2: The Ballpark Bus. The Ballpark Bus was hatched by one Brian Bowman, a Nationals fan who doesn’t live close enough to a WMATA Metro station to make taking the train to get to Nationals Park convenient, despite the ease of use for most D.C.-area residents.

Parking at Nats Park is expensive, and driving in D.C. isn’t much fun either. So rather than complain to the Metro people or the Nationals, Bowman came up with his own solution for Nats fans that share his dilemma.

The Ballpark Bus runs from Ashburn and Reston, two areas west of the District that are not covered by the Metro’s tentacles. Bowman worked out deals with local taverns and restaurants for the pickup areas, and some of these establishments will offer food specials with the ride…winners all around.

It’s affordable too…cheaper than driving and especially parking. Just reserve a spot ahead of time, and if the demand is high enough the bus will roll; and if not, you won’t be charged.

What I love about the Ballpark Bus is that it’s a private enterprise—“mass transit on demand” as they call it. I understand that cities require taxpayer-funded ways for people to get to the ballpark and I‘m not knocking it—especially in Washington, where local taxpayers footed the entire bill for the place. The city has to recoup its investment and no one will go if it’s too difficult to get there. But the Ballpark Bus is an independent solution, to a problem that many Nats fans still have.

And of course, putting it in the Nationals Park E-Guide makes me look smart…

Check it out here: www.ballparkbus.com. (Logo courtesy of Ballpark Bus.)

 

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Nationals Park Food: Three Things To Try

Posted by Kurt Smith

The Nationals Park food menu is as diversified as any ballpark’s, and you have an awful lot to choose from, and most of it’s really good.

But since I’ve already covered the Shake Shack and Box Frites in the Citi Field section of this website, here are some things at the home of D.C. baseball for you to try on your next trip.

nationals Park food bens chili

Yes, there is a smoked sausage in there.

Nationals Park Food, Tip #1: The Ben’s Chili Half-Smoke. Ben’s Chili Bowl is a well-known D.C. institution. Its founder, Ben Ali, started his own chili business following his inability to finish dental school after falling down a broken elevator shaft. Eventually he turned a pool hall into Ben’s Chili, developed his outstanding spicy chili recipe, and the rest is history.

Ali passed away in October of 2009, but his greatness lives on in Nats Park. The Chili Half-Smoke “All The Way” is a sausage that is like a kielbasa (but beefier and spicier), topped with Ben’s famous spicy chili, cheese, onions and mustard. They are very generous with the chili, and you need a lot of napkins and a spoon.

Ben’s stands used to get crowded, but they have four locations in the park now and the Shake Shack’s appearance has taken over, so you shouldn’t have to wait too long to get one these days. And in my opinion, it’s still the go-to food here.

If you want something local, this is still the best spot. Ben’s is uniquely D.C., and uniquely Nationals Park.

nationals park food grilled cheese

If you make it look delicious enough, you can charge almost any price.

Nationals Park Food, Tip #2: Chesapeake Bay Crab Cake Grilled Cheese. Baltimore isn’t the only city close enough to the Chesapeake Bay to make it a crab town, and Nationals Park does quietly have a few crab items of its own at the Chesapeake Bay Crab Co. stand.

I couldn’t help but notice this particular sandwich, a grilled cheese with crab meat on a hefty piece of bread. It comes with chips, which somewhat softens the blow of the price tag. Ballpark + seafood = really expensive.

But if you can splurge, and you’re hungry, grab a bite of the crab grilled cheese. If not, try the crab nachos.

nationals park food jammin island

The only thing missing is Bob Marley music.

Nationals Park Food, Tip #3: The Jammin’ Island Jerk Chicken Sandwich. I wasn’t lucky enough in my last visit, but employees have been known to pass out samples of the Jammin’ Island jerk chicken, which often results in sales.

Spicy jerk chicken goes great with beer, and on some nights you can get a beer cheaper than usual at Nats Park. The sandwich has cole slaw piled onto it. It doesn’t include sides, but you can get them added for a fee.

There are two Jammin’ Island outposts, one near the Bud Light Loft in center field. If you know to get a discounted beer, that’s the place to be.

There are three Nationals Park food items to try, but I don’t mean any disrespect to some of the other choices…there are great Virginia Ham & Biscuits, the intriguing Haute Dogs, and the Kapnos Greek stand upstairs. Be sure to plan ahead.

 
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What To Eat At Nationals Park – Three More Foods

Posted by Kurt Smith

I’ve partially answered the question of what to eat at Nationals Park with this post about Ben’s Chili and Jammin’ Island BBQ, but the Nationals Park food menu is too diverse and high end for one post. Here are three more great foods to try at the home of the Nats:

 

nationals park food enzos pizza

This guy was far less enthusiastic when he was serving Papa John’s.

What to Eat at Nationals Park, Tip #1: Enzo’s Pizza. The Nationals wisely decided to eschew Papa John’s in favor of Enzo’s recently, which is a move we can all applaud. If a ballpark is going to represent local foods, that should include pizza.

This writer tried a slice of Enzo’s in a recent visit to Nats Park and was well pleased, and it isn’t easy to please a South Jersey guy when it comes to pizza. In fact, it might be the best slice of pizza I’ve had at a ballpark (although in fairness, as of this writing I haven’t tried Two Boots). The crust is thin and it comes with an ample amount of pepperoni. It’s on the greasy side, but you can pat it with a napkin if you care about such things.

From Papa John’s to Enzo’s. +1 Nats.

 

nationals park food roasted cauliflower

It doesn’t have to be unhealthy, it just has to look unhealthy.

What to Eat at Nationals Park, Tip #2: The Roasted Cauliflower Sandwich. What? A sandwich with roasted vegetables at a ballgame? But Kurt, the whole ballpark food thing is about hot dogs and popcorn and…

Yeah, I get that. But this sandwich has a few things going for it…it’s made by chef Mike Isabella of G Sandwich fame, it’s good and messy with the romesco sauce, arugula, and pickled vegetables piled into it, and it’s actually pretty decent value for a ballpark (as is the Italian hero at this stand).

Besides that, it’s vegetarian, healthy, all that stuff. Which makes you feel less guilty about some sort of dessert, like…

 

nationals park food district

You gotta be slick to nail down a photo before they disappear.

What to Eat at Nationals Park, Tip #3: District Doughnuts. The District Doughnuts stand was added in 2015 I believe; it’s from a Barracks Row store that is very well known with locals for their hot and crispy donuts.

The District Doughnut people admit that their doughnuts are smaller than the industry average (seriously…one of their reps told me that)…but that’s on purpose. It helps the flavor, see. As a doughnut lover, I can vouch for the value of small and toasty doughnuts.

At the Nats Park edition of DD, you can get the simple vanilla, cinnamon sugar or powdered sugar doughnuts; they might have an unusual flavor like their popular Dulce De Leche when you visit.

There you go folks…but I’ve only covered a small sampling of the phenomenal food selection at the ballpark in D.C. You’ll want to know about the Cajun mac and cheese, the loaded baked potatoes, and that amazing Babka ice cream sandwich, among many other choices. Don’t miss out on the cool stuff…get yourself one of these and think ahead!

 

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Three Extra Nationals Park Tips For Fans

Posted by Kurt Smith

Hopefully you’ve found some helpful Nationals Park tips elsewhere on this website…you really don’t want to miss the Ben’s Chili Half-Smoke. Here are a few more things to check out in your next trip to the ballpark.

nationals park tips presidents race

I think this was a promotion for the second Paul Blart movie.

Extra Nationals Park Tips, #1: The Presidents’ Race. The whole idea of racing mascots started in Milwaukee, I think, with five different types of sausages racing against each other. The Presidents’ Race in Washington is in a similar vein, but with all due respect to the racing sausages, I like the Presidents’ Race better, because of Teddy Roosevelt.

Teddy (almost) never wins, you see, and it’s always for some wacky reason: unauthorized use of a feline, pre-game warmup injuries or dive-bombing a racing sausage when the Brewers come to town.

There is a terrific blog devoted to Teddy’s mishaps called “Let Teddy Win” (check out the celebration of Teddy’s long-awaited first victory). Well worth seeing in the middle of the 4th inning, and the Nats do it again if there’s a 13th inning. The mascots often greet fans before the game outside of the center field gate.

nationals park tips walter johnson statue

Walter Johnson, best known for his “six-arm” delivery.

Extra Nationals Park Tips, #2: The Motion Statues. OK, I get the whole idea of trying to create the illusion of motion in a statue, and sometimes statue makers can pull it off. This isn’t one of those times. Walter Johnson, possibly the greatest pitcher in history, looks as though he has six arms. What’s wrong with just depicting the guy in the middle of his windup? It worked just fine for Steve Carlton in Philly.

I hate to be critical of Nationals Park, because it’s a great venue, but they kinda goofed on this one. So that, in itself, makes these statues worth seeing. Check out Frank Howard swinging six bats, and Josh Gibson carrying a bat behind him with his third arm. And don’t try that at home.

nationals park tips view of anacostia

Ballparks near water are a cool thing.

Extra Nationals Park Tips, #3: The Upper Concourse View. As you get out into the right field area of the upper level, there is a really terrific view of the Anacostia River. Even if you don’t have a seat in this area, it’s worth taking the elevator or the stairs to get to the upper level and have a look. And from there it isn’t far to get to the party area behind the scoreboard.

By the way, from the upper concourse you can also see the Washington Monument and the Capitol…enjoy that view before more high rises get in the way.

That’s just three helpful Nats Park tips; if you want to have the best experience at the best price, be sure to plan ahead and read this handy little guide first.

 

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What Happened To The Montreal Expos?

Posted by Kurt Smith

Like most baseball fans, I didn’t know the full story of what happened to the Montreal Expos. When I read a bit about it, it turned out to be very different than what I thought.

In May of 2004 I took a long weekend and made a trip to Montreal, to see a game at Olympic Stadium before the Expos moved to Washington to become the Nationals.

what happened to the montreal expos mount royal

I made it to the top before I realized there was an elevator.

I had a very enjoyable time in Montreal. First there was the very pleasant ride on I-87 through parts of New York state that people don’t know about, and the even more enjoyable ride home on 9N. And Montreal is a neat city—there is Mount Royal and its terrific view of the skyline, the smoked beef sandwich from Schwartz’s, the fine public transit system, and the incredible Notre Dame Basilica cathedral, a church so stunningly beautiful that I did not bother trying to do it justice with photos.

So being in a city that I held in fairly high regard, it was sad to see how interest in baseball was barely moving the needle. The game I attended was against the St. Louis Cardinals, and it drew a crowd of about 5,000—probably 2,000 of which were Cards fans. The Expos won an exciting contest with the help of star shortstop Jose Vidro, and I remember hearing a radio show afterward with the host expressing hope against hope that the city could keep its baseball team.

what happened to the montreal expos empty seats

When lower level sections are blocked off, there’s a problem.

The Expos’ departure from Montreal is often summarily dismissed as being the result of the city being obsessed with its hockey team and just not caring about baseball. I thought this myself before taking an interest in the subject recently, and I’ve since taken a different tack, to the point where I’d like to see baseball return to the second largest city in Canada.

Baseball in Montreal drew some nice crowds once—in fact the Expos outdrew the New York Yankees for a couple of seasons in the 1980s. The team was competitive in those years, almost reaching the World Series in 1981 and falling a game or two short of winning the NL East in a couple of other seasons. The Expos finished second in 1980 and in 1993 to Phillies teams that just happened to be loaded.

In 1994, however, the Expos had put together the best team that Montreal had seen yet. This is a team that featured Larry Walker, Marquis Grissom, Moises Alou and Ken Hill, and they had some pretty good arms on the mound, too: names like John Wetteland, Jeff Fassero, and a guy by the name of Pedro Martinez. By August, the Expos were leading the National League East with a 74-40 record. And we all know what happened then.

what happened to the montreal expos stade olympique

The announcer was really good at both French and English.

The strike of 1994, that killed the rest of the season and the World Series, instilled great anger in baseball fans everywhere, and it showed in the attendance in 1995. But it was particularly hard on Expos fans who had possibly been rooting for the best team that had ever been fielded in their city. (Larry Walker believes unequivocally to this day that the Expos would have won the World Series.)

The Expos were drawing 34,000 a game at the time, not spectacular for a contending team, but certainly better than any attendance average figure the Rays have ever managed. And this in Stade Olympique, which was one of the most unappealing venues in baseball.

The strike was the first of several blows that would eventually drive the Expos out of town.

After a season that had given more hope to Expos fans than any season ever had only to deprive them of an ending, Expos’ owner Claude Brochu ordered GM Kevin Malone to slash the payroll, and the Expos started their next season without Larry Walker, Ken Hill, John Wetteland and Marquis Grissom.

Depleted and discouraged, the Expos finished last in 1995. Soon later, Moises Alou, Jeff Fassero and Pedro Martinez would all be gone.

what happened to the montreal expos olympia

Paid attendance for this game: 5,332. They didn’t put that number on the scoreboard.

If you’ve ever been a fan of a team that has a fire sale after a winning season, you know what it does to attendance. Fans hate that. For a team to lose two-thirds of its gate is not unusual. Imagine the effect on fans when the best team that the town had ever seen has been gutted. The fire sale happened in 1995…after the Toronto Blue Jays had won back-to-back titles, establishing them as Canada’s premier MLB team. It is something like the Red Sox having broken their long-standing curse a year after the Cubs fell just short of breaking theirs.

The Expos never really recovered. Jeffrey Loria purchased the team in 1999 and instantly became unpopular with Expos fans by not renewing the television and English-speaking radio contracts. From what I’ve read, the terms of the deal Loria wanted were such that their stations walked away from the table without bothering to negotiate.

As a result, if you were an English-speaking Expos fan, your choices to know what happened in a game were to either go to the ballpark or read about it on the Internet or the paper. This isn’t something fans today are willing to tolerate, and nor should they.

Loria then went about attempting to secure funding for a new ballpark. Labatt Park had some fine innovations…it wasn’t designed by HOK, so there were some new ideas…and for a while the team looked like it could get its wish. But eventually the premier of the province of Quebec, Lucien Bouchard, decided that he couldn’t in good conscience spend taxpayer money to build a new stadium in a city where hospitals were closing.

In retrospect, if Montreal baseball had been revived, the tax revenues the team brought in could have saved some hospitals, but the Expos couldn’t justify that with the attendance at the time.

what happened to the montreal expos expos photo

So who is the beer sponsor?

The death of the ballpark deal probably rightly convinced Expos fans that baseball in Montreal was now on life support.

Animosity towards the ownership—which eventually became Major League Baseball, so that Loria could buy a team in a city that would gladly spend taxpayer money for a ballpark for him—along with a team that showed so much promise only to be gutted, and being forced to attend the game to see it live, all of these things turned off Expos fans so much that by 2004 they were showing up in record low numbers, and 3,000-5,000 per game was common.

After being insulted and taken for granted on so many levels, Montrealers may have been wishing the Expos and Major League Baseball good riddance by 2004, but one could hardly blame them.

They had seen greed destroy their most promising season, ownership that was willing to sell off the team’s biggest stars and not allow fans to watch games on television or listen on the radio, and refuse to even try to negotiate with a city on new ballpark financing, which might have been possible had Loria been willing.

The blame for the Expos’ departure belongs not on Montreal fans as a group or Montreal as a sports market. A combination of factors that would have destroyed fan support anywhere conspired to victimize a city that, until August of 1994, had been building a strong baseball tradition.

The strike of 1994 angered a lot of baseball fans, but ultimately its biggest toll was on the fans in Montreal. It set the wheels in motion for the sad, drawn out ending, the only upside of which has been the return of baseball to Washington, D.C.

what happened to the montreal expos fans at nats park

The movement to bring the Nationals back to Montreal!

Perhaps baseball will have an opportunity to return to the great city of Montreal; I hope so. As I hope I’ve illustrated here, to say the market won’t support baseball isn’t true.

 

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